Handlaying double slip turnout?

Handlaying double slip turnout?

Post by jo.. » Thu, 18 Dec 1997 04:00:00



I need two #6 double slip turnouts on the layout I'm building.  I'd like
to hand lay them but can't find any instructions.  MR had an article on it
in 1953 (can't recall which issue right now) but I can't find a more
modern reference.   The local library only has MR back too 1967.

Can anyone suggest a source of plans?  Or a method?   Anything on the Web?
I've looked but no luck so far.

Thanks in advance.

--

St Albert, Ab.
PGP public key provided on request

 
 
 

Handlaying double slip turnout?

Post by Jeff Scher » Thu, 18 Dec 1997 04:00:00


The database is at http://www.plannetarium.com/tm

Building a double-slip switch, part 1
   MR  9/1953 p63  
        ("CUSHMAN, ROBERT F.", DOUBLESLIP, HANDLAY, SCRATCHBUILD, SWITCH,
           TRACK )

Building a double-slip switch, part 2
   MR 10/1953 p64  
        ("CUSHMAN, ROBERT F.", DOUBLESLIP, HANDLAY, SCRATCHBUILD, SWITCH,
           TRACK )

jeff



Quote:
> I need two #6 double slip turnouts on the layout I'm building.  I'd like
> to hand lay them but can't find any instructions.  MR had an article on
it
> in 1953 (can't recall which issue right now) but I can't find a more
> modern reference.   The local library only has MR back too 1967.

> Can anyone suggest a source of plans?  Or a method?   Anything on the
Web?
> I've looked but no luck so far.

> Thanks in advance.

> --

> St Albert, Ab.
> PGP public key provided on request


 
 
 

Handlaying double slip turnout?

Post by Access Syste » Fri, 19 Dec 1997 04:00:00



Quote:

> >I need two #6 double slip turnouts on the layout I'm building.  I'd like
> >to hand lay them but can't find any instructions.  MR had an article on it
> July and August, 1951, RMC had a article on hand laying in HO scale.
> ....Keith  (if responding, be sure to correct the Reply-To address.)

if you handlay regular turnouts the double slip should not be much more
difficult.  if you have not handlaid regular switches, do not start with
special work of anykind.  you might want to build it on your workbench,
either on a removable section of subroadbed or in such a manner as it can
be moved to the site later (such as soldering bars accross the rails on
top when finished, move it, respike it, unsolder the bars)

personally I do all trackwork on site, but I have a shelf layout so it is
not far from the edge to any place on the RR.

good luck, take your time, do it perfect, you will enjoy it for many
years!

Bob

 
 
 

Handlaying double slip turnout?

Post by Bob Fi » Fri, 19 Dec 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

>The database is at http://www.plannetarium.com/tm

>Building a double-slip switch, part 1
>   MR  9/1953 p63
>        ("CUSHMAN, ROBERT F.", DOUBLESLIP, HANDLAY, SCRATCHBUILD, SWITCH,
>           TRACK )

>Building a double-slip switch, part 2
>   MR 10/1953 p64
>        ("CUSHMAN, ROBERT F.", DOUBLESLIP, HANDLAY, SCRATCHBUILD, SWITCH,
>           TRACK )

  I have custom bult a number of double slips in HO
 from that two article series in the '53 MR and it is well written and accurate.

  I also blew up the rail layout to 1/4" scale a number of years ago and built one
 for a friend in O Scale.  The only problem there was using a torch to solder the
large size brass rail caused my pine board to begin to burn!  Be careful with
large soldering jobs.

Bob Fink

 
 
 

Handlaying double slip turnout?

Post by Scott Perr » Mon, 22 Dec 1997 04:00:00


I have hand laid and used double slips before...my thoughts.

If you love dereailments, double slip is the way to go.
If you love maintenance problems, put double slips everywhere.
If you like running trains, follow Mr. Armonstrong's advice - no double
slips.
If you just GOTTA HAVE ONE, build it at the work bench and install it
as a seperate piece so that it can be removed.  Put the switch machines
on the
same board and attach the wiring to terminal strips.

God help ya, man!

Quote:

> I need two #6 double slip turnouts on the layout I'm building.  I'd
> like
> to hand lay them but can't find any instructions.  MR had an article
> on it
> in 1953 (can't recall which issue right now) but I can't find a more
> modern reference.   The local library only has MR back too 1967.

> Can anyone suggest a source of plans?  Or a method?   Anything on the
> Web?
> I've looked but no luck so far.

> Thanks in advance.

> --
> John Kennedy                         email:

> St Albert, Ab.
> PGP public key provided on request

 
 
 

Handlaying double slip turnout?

Post by Eastern Mountain Model » Mon, 22 Dec 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> I have hand laid and used double slips before...my thoughts.

> If you love dereailments, double slip is the way to go.
> If you love maintenance problems, put double slips everywhere.
> If you like running trains, follow Mr. Armonstrong's advice - no double
> slips.
> If you just GOTTA HAVE ONE, build it at the work bench and install it
> as a seperate piece so that it can be removed.  Put the switch machines
> on the
> same board and attach the wiring to terminal strips.

> God help ya, man!

It ain't necessarily so, but you do have a point. Admittedly double slips
are a "real joy" however what is your suggestion if one models a prototype
situation which includes the critters?
I have built about 10 of the variety in HOm, which is just slightly larger
than HOn3, and they work just fine, thank you. The proof of the pudding is
backing up a 6car passenger train with talgo mounted Kadee couplers through
2 adjoining double slips.
I admit it helps a lot to have lots of experience in handlaying track and
it doesn't hurt to have an eagle eye for those little snag points in track
work.
And yes, I try to build all my trackwork on the workbench rather than the
layout.

HJ

--
Hans-Joerg Mueller
Eastern Mountain Models
Hillsburgh, Ontario, Canada

 
 
 

Handlaying double slip turnout?

Post by John Purbri » Tue, 23 Dec 1997 04:00:00


I've never done a double slip, though I've built quite a few switches. If you
can get a copy of Iain Rice's "An Approach to Building Finescale Track in
4mm" you'll have a good start. It's a British book and so the rail is funny
shaped, but most of the techniques in working with the rail, and the gauges
and tools you'll want to have, are applicable to any scale or rail type. His
results are extremely good and the book is well written and densely
illustrated with both drawings and photos.

Rice says that a double slip has an "unjustified reputation as the 'north face
of the Eiger' of model trackbuilding". I'd like an excuse to try one!

As for reliablitity, my experience is that if it doesn't work well, you've
made mistakes. A switch that's built right doesn't cause derailments unless
the equipment passing through it has misgauged wheels. In fact, if the
switchwork is done properly you can press a car down on the rails, close your
eyes and roll it through without being able to detect the points or frogs by
feel.

 
 
 

Handlaying double slip turnout?

Post by J Bruce Andrew » Wed, 24 Dec 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> I've never done a double slip, though I've built quite a few switches. If you
> can get a copy of Iain Rice's "An Approach to Building Finescale Track in
> 4mm" you'll have a good start. It's a British book and so the rail is funny
> shaped, but most of the techniques in working with the rail, and the gauges
> and tools you'll want to have, are applicable to any scale or rail type. His
> results are extremely good and the book is well written and densely
> illustrated with both drawings and photos.

Another good book is Trackwork Handbook for Model Railroads by Paul
Mallery. This was published in the US by Carstens Publications. Also,
there was a good article called Double Slip Switch by  Wayne Wilson in
the December 1995 issue of Mainline Modeler.

Quote:
> Rice says that a double slip has an "unjustified reputation as the 'north face
> of the Eiger' of model trackbuilding". I'd like an excuse to try one!

> As for reliablitity, my experience is that if it doesn't work well, you've
> made mistakes. A switch that's built right doesn't cause derailments unless
> the equipment passing through it has misgauged wheels. In fact, if the
> switchwork is done properly you can press a car down on the rails, close your
> eyes and roll it through without being able to detect the points or frogs by
> feel.

It seems to me that the biggest problem with a double slip is the
interior frog.  In his book, Mallery presents an argument for why
rigid interior frogs will not work for a number 8 or higher double slip.
He reomends using moveable points for the interior frogs. This is also
the approach used by Wilson. I am planning a module with a number 6
double slip and am leaning towards the moveable frog design. It just
looks more reliable. Anyone have any experience with this?

Bruce

 
 
 

Handlaying double slip turnout?

Post by kei.. » Wed, 24 Dec 1997 04:00:00



Quote:

>It seems to me that the biggest problem with a double slip is the
>interior frog.  In his book, Mallery presents an argument for why
>rigid interior frogs will not work for a number 8 or higher double slip.

The "interior frogs" or obtuse crossings are the same in a double slip
as in a diamond crossing, number 8 is the highest practical number in
the prototype, at least in the UK higher numbers are not allowed by
the safety regulations and the movable type must be used.

Quote:
>He reomends using moveable points for the interior frogs. This is also
>the approach used by Wilson. I am planning a module with a number 6
>double slip and am leaning towards the moveable frog design. It just
>looks more reliable. Anyone have any experience with this?

I have built a number 8 in P4 standards and great care is needed as it
is getting marginal as the tolerances used are not as tight as the
prototype, I would now not go above a number 7 with fixed crossings.
With normal H0 standards I would certainly use the movable type for
No. 8s. However No 6 will work fine with fixed obtuse crossings and
there is no need to go for movable ones with the complications of the
extra motors or levers.