Real Trains and Real Songs

Real Trains and Real Songs

Post by Trainma » Sat, 10 Feb 2001 04:53:57




Quote:

> > Looking at a list of Rock Island "Name trains" ca. 1957 or so, I don't
see
> > it listed.  While most Rock Island trains were "Rockets" the only one I
see
> > listed with "Golden" in the name is The "Golden State", the  joint
CRIP/SP
> > train.

> > Besides, Hank Snow is COUNTRY, Dimitre said "Mainstream"  <GD&R>

> Why would you assume that the Golden Rocket would be a Rock Island train?
> After all, Hank Snow was Canadian. I would've thought it was either CN or
> CP.

> So, what does "GD&R" mean? Sounds like the name of a railroad to me.

A habit from the old "Fidonet" days when  it cost lots of money to send
messages around the country via long distance dial-up connections amongst
the free bulleten boards.  You used abbbreviations as much as possible.

GD&R means "Grin Duck & Run".  (as opposed to just "G" meaning "grin", also
expressed as the "emoticon"  :) or :<)

Don

--

http://www.geocities.com/don_dellmann


 
 
 

Real Trains and Real Songs

Post by Jeff Scarbrou » Sat, 10 Feb 2001 09:12:09




Quote:
>> And Neil Young (well known US singer and Lionel freak) had a song
>> called Southern Pacific on his Reactor (I think) album.

>Yes, it was on RE*AC*TOR, that was a pretty cool (different?) album by him.

I've got it on a 45rpm that is, oddly enough, triangular...

I like Neil -- he does it his way more than Frank ever did.

Jeff "single-handed" Scarbrough   Proud Charter Member  
Athens, Georgia  CEO and Section Gang, Piedmont and Southern Railroad

 http://serr.railfan.net      http://smrf.railfan.net/SMRF      

 
 
 

Real Trains and Real Songs

Post by D. Argir » Sat, 10 Feb 2001 10:46:43


Quote:

>I like Neil -- he does it his way more than Frank ever did.

Yes. Being a Southerner living in Dixie by choice, I especially like his rendition of
"Southern Man"
It's a really heart-warming little ditty......don't you think?
 
 
 

Real Trains and Real Songs

Post by Roy Wil » Sat, 10 Feb 2001 10:52:36


Except Glenn Miller didn't record "Take The A Train."

You're thinking of Duke Ellington's Orchestra, methinks.

On Thu, 8 Feb 2001 15:08:10 -0500, "Claude Allen"

Quote:

>David,

>I didn't say he wrote it, I only said he recorded it.  Generally recorded
>music is sold under the name of the recording artist, and not the writer.
>Hence, a bajillion people think of "Paradise" as a John Denver songe when it
>was written by John Prine(Just a slightly OT mention, because it's all wbout
>Mr. Peabody's coal trains hauling away western Kentucky).

>Claude



>> > In that case,
>> > "Trans Europe Express" by Kraftwerk(German, pre-techno)

>> > And, to not ignore one of the most widely used transit systems in the
>U.S.,
>> > "Take the A Train" by the Glenn Miller Band.

>> No, no, no, not even close: Billy Strayhorn, who actually had to get
>> directions to Duke Ellington's house to try out for his band, and was thus
>> inspired to write that timeless tune.

>> Sheesh, here it is, what, 70 years later, and black songwriters *still*
>> don't get credit!

>> --
>>   Who needs cool reviews? What does another cool review add to the sum
>>   of human knowledge? I should have kept my trap shut.

>>   - Orson Welles, referring to his review of Sergei Eisenstein's
>>   "Ivan the Terrible"

 
 
 

Real Trains and Real Songs

Post by Roy Wil » Sat, 10 Feb 2001 10:56:24


On Thu, 8 Feb 2001 07:35:38 -0600, "Trainman"

Quote:

>That's not a train, that's a railroad.  Dimitre was looking for songs about
>specific "name trains".

>Don

Well, a specific locomotive of the A.T. & S.F. ("engine #49") is named
in that song.
 
 
 

Real Trains and Real Songs

Post by Claude Alle » Sat, 10 Feb 2001 11:14:28


Yeah, you're right.  I saw the reincarnation of the Glenn Miller Band about
ten years ago, and they played the song in concert, but as a cover.  I
realized my mistake when I went through the CD collection this evening.
There was a song, called "The Wreck of the FFV"(Fast Flying ***ian, or
First Families of ***ia-depending on which C&O history you follow), but
I'm not sure if anyone major recorded it.  It was about a train wreck that
happened new White Sulphur Springs, WV.

Claude

Quote:
> Except Glenn Miller didn't record "Take The A Train."

> You're thinking of Duke Ellington's Orchestra, methinks.

> On Thu, 8 Feb 2001 15:08:10 -0500, "Claude Allen"

> >David,

> >I didn't say he wrote it, I only said he recorded it.  Generally recorded
> >music is sold under the name of the recording artist, and not the writer.
> >Hence, a bajillion people think of "Paradise" as a John Denver songe when
it
> >was written by John Prine(Just a slightly OT mention, because it's all
wbout
> >Mr. Peabody's coal trains hauling away western Kentucky).

> >Claude



> >> > In that case,
> >> > "Trans Europe Express" by Kraftwerk(German, pre-techno)

> >> > And, to not ignore one of the most widely used transit systems in the
> >U.S.,
> >> > "Take the A Train" by the Glenn Miller Band.

> >> No, no, no, not even close: Billy Strayhorn, who actually had to get
> >> directions to Duke Ellington's house to try out for his band, and was
thus
> >> inspired to write that timeless tune.

> >> Sheesh, here it is, what, 70 years later, and black songwriters *still*
> >> don't get credit!

> >> --
> >>   Who needs cool reviews? What does another cool review add to the sum
> >>   of human knowledge? I should have kept my trap shut.

> >>   - Orson Welles, referring to his review of Sergei Eisenstein's
> >>   "Ivan the Terrible"

 
 
 

Real Trains and Real Songs

Post by Rick Jone » Sat, 10 Feb 2001 11:40:28


Quote:


> >Well, Big D, as you didn't specify NA :)

> <Demetre is grinning from ear to ear>

> No, I didn't. And it's just as well. I'm trying to train myself not to do that anyway. This is
> a world-wide comunications medium and we all need to remember that. So, OK, let's have it world
> wide, but keep it mainstream if possible. That is, something I can go to a record store (CD
> store?) and reasonably expect to find with little or no trouble.

   OK, since you originally said "mainstream" I was thinking songs that
did relatively well on the Top 40 or Top 100 charts. If the criteria is
simply that it has to be reasonably available I'll throw in these two:
"The Silverton" and "The Gallopin' Goose", both by C. W. McCall of
"Convoy" fame. "The Silverton" is on the "Black Bear Road" album while
"The Gallopin' Goose" is on "Roses For Mama".
--
                Rick Jones
        Remove the Extra Dot to e-mail me

Write an OS that only a fool would want to use and you'll become an
enormous monopoly.

 
 
 

Real Trains and Real Songs

Post by Mark Math » Sat, 10 Feb 2001 11:46:55


Quote:
> I would say that, for our purposes, If I could go to
> a place that sells recorded music and buy the piece
> or get it with little or no hassle, that would be
> good enough for me. If everybody can agree on that
> definition then let's go.

[To me, that seems like a bit of a stretch for the definition of a "mainstream
hit song."  But hey, it's your question, and your definition, so I'm sure we
can all work with that definition and come up with  a list.]

Based on that, it seems that Merle Haggard's 1976 song "Here Comes the Freedom
Train" would qualify.

- The Freedom Train was an actual train that traveled the US in 1975-76.

- The song is available on Merle Haggard's "Capitol Collectors Series" CD.
(http://www.FoundCollection.com/***.ca/album/107791)
It was originally released on his "My Love Affair With Trains" album.

- The song peaked at #10 on the Billboard Country Music charts.

Quote:
> Since you seem to know, where did Willie Nelson go
> with his version of CONO?

Sorry, don't know.  My main source is a book called The Billboard Book of Top
40 Hits, and it is not listed there.  So it didn't make it that far.
 
 
 

Real Trains and Real Songs

Post by Trainma » Sat, 10 Feb 2001 09:09:58



Quote:
> > I would say that, for our purposes, If I could go to
> > a place that sells recorded music and buy the piece
> > or get it with little or no hassle, that would be
> > good enough for me. If everybody can agree on that
> > definition then let's go.

> [To me, that seems like a bit of a stretch for the definition of a
"mainstream
> hit song."  But hey, it's your question, and your definition, so I'm sure
we
> can all work with that definition and come up with  a list.]

> Based on that, it seems that Merle Haggard's 1976 song "Here Comes the
Freedom
> Train" would qualify.

> - The Freedom Train was an actual train that traveled the US in 1975-76.

> - The song is available on Merle Haggard's "Capitol Collectors Series" CD.
> (http://www.FoundCollection.com/***.ca/album/107791)
> It was originally released on his "My Love Affair With Trains" album.

And if you have the "My Love Affair with Trains" LP, you can even see shots
of Merle's own layout.

Don

--

http://www.FoundCollection.com/


 
 
 

Real Trains and Real Songs

Post by Jeff Scarbrou » Sat, 10 Feb 2001 12:41:23


Quote:


>>I like Neil -- he does it his way more than Frank ever did.

>Yes. Being a Southerner living in Dixie by choice, I especially like his rendition of
>"Southern Man"
>It's a really heart-warming little ditty......don't you think?

Don't forget "Alabama" -- he didn't make a lot of friends down here
with that one either...

Jeff "single-handed" Scarbrough   Proud Charter Member  
Athens, Georgia  CEO and Section Gang, Piedmont and Southern Railroad

 http://serr.railfan.net      http://smrf.railfan.net/SMRF      

 
 
 

Real Trains and Real Songs

Post by D. Argir » Sat, 10 Feb 2001 13:29:35


Quote:

>[To me, that seems like a bit of a stretch for the definition of a "mainstream
>hit song."  But hey, it's your question, and your definition, so I'm sure we
>can all work with that definition and come up with  a list.]

Well, actually it does to me too. But then you have to consider that I'm working with train
songs here, which is not exactly mainstream in and of itself either.. I mean, even with that
lattitude I still only have seven songs that are about a specific train. And I haven't verified
but four of them, that is, if I take yours prima-face.
So you see, at the moment I still have only my original three, and yours<G>

Not to mention, of course, all the misc. "train songs" that don't fit the requirements that
have been posted. Chattanooga Choo Choo, Santa-Fe...yada yada yada....  But,  that's usenet.
I'm used to it.

 
 
 

Real Trains and Real Songs

Post by D. Argir » Sat, 10 Feb 2001 14:01:31


Quote:

>Not to mention, of course, all the misc. "train songs" that don't fit the requirements that
>have been posted. Chattanooga Choo Choo, Santa-Fe...yada yada yada....  But,  that's usenet.
>I'm used to it.

<><><>TOM<><><> just posted what I think is the all-time list of train songs in NA.  There must
be 300 or more entries on it, only about eight of which fit the description of songs written
about real specific trains where the train antedated the song. That is assuming that the list
is error free, which it may or may not be. I really thought there would be more.
 
 
 

Real Trains and Real Songs

Post by Howard R. Garne » Sat, 10 Feb 2001 20:57:41


Add  Take the A Train to your list.  A gret jazz number about the A
subway train.
Quote:


> >[To me, that seems like a bit of a stretch for the definition of a "mainstream
> >hit song."  But hey, it's your question, and your definition, so I'm sure we
> >can all work with that definition and come up with  a list.]

> Well, actually it does to me too. But then you have to consider that I'm working with train
> songs here, which is not exactly mainstream in and of itself either.. I mean, even with that
> lattitude I still only have seven songs that are about a specific train. And I haven't verified
> but four of them, that is, if I take yours prima-face.
> So you see, at the moment I still have only my original three, and yours<G>

> Not to mention, of course, all the misc. "train songs" that don't fit the requirements that
> have been posted. Chattanooga Choo Choo, Santa-Fe...yada yada yada....  But,  that's usenet.
> I'm used to it.

 
 
 

Real Trains and Real Songs

Post by JCNOP » Sun, 11 Feb 2001 00:45:21


<< - The Freedom Train was an actual train that traveled the US in 1975-76. >>

True, I took a hundred 6th graders through it at Fair Park in Dallas
(ah--retirement is wonderful) but I wonder if any of you "geezers" like me
remember the original Freedom Train that also toured the country in (I think)
1947/48.  Also saw that in Amarillo on a field trip only I was one of the kids
not the teacher in charge.

Jerry C. in Duncanville