Real Trains and Real Songs

Real Trains and Real Songs

Post by Trainma » Sun, 11 Feb 2001 07:31:20



Pictures only, LOVE those Alco PA's.

There was an article, maybe 10 years or more ago, in Model Railroader by
someone who actually did a credible HO model of the original Freedom Train.

Don

--

http://www.geocities.com/don_dellmann



Quote:
> << - The Freedom Train was an actual train that traveled the US in
1975-76. >>

> True, I took a hundred 6th graders through it at Fair Park in Dallas
> (ah--retirement is wonderful) but I wonder if any of you "geezers" like me
> remember the original Freedom Train that also toured the country in (I
think)
> 1947/48.  Also saw that in Amarillo on a field trip only I was one of the
kids
> not the teacher in charge.

> Jerry C. in Duncanville

 
 
 

Real Trains and Real Songs

Post by D. Argir » Fri, 16 Feb 2001 04:17:26



Quote:
>I'm sorry, but I can't stand it.

>Please note corrections below.
>> >> Were there any other REAL trains that had mainstream hit songs
>> >written about them.

>> >> Repeat:  REAL trains that had mainstream hit songs written about them.

>> >> NOT:  Wabash Cannonball, Blue Water Line, Casey Jones or The Wreck of
>> >Old 97.

BRAVO!
Such a lot of work, Gary. And you did a helluva good job too. As far as I can
determine, you are spot-on.

But you, like so many others, seem to have missed the point. I can only conclude that
it must be my fault for not asking the question in a better way.

The "City of New Orleans" is about the train itself. It is about the "life and times"
of the train.  It is philosophically and emotionally tied to the train as a corporeal
entity.  The train is both a real train and a metaphorical one. The story (song) is
an allegory.  That Goodman chose a real train to write about is a huge plus. IMO it
is the best railroad song of all time.

"Casey Jones" is not a song about IC train # 1, it's a song about John L. Jones. It's
really a song about a train wreck, but here the wreck is almost secondary to Jones as
the main focus.

The Wreck of Old 97 is, likewise, a song about a train wreck.  The work does not
focus on # 97 as the center of interest. The center of interest is the wreck.  # 97
is there because it was the one wrecked. Beyond that it has no significance of its
own merit.

No one, least of all me, ever said that they weren't real railroad songs, or that
they were fictional.  I said they were not specifically about a particular train, and
they aren't. They are event-related, not object related, and there is the difference.

BTW: John Luther Jones was born in Sykeston Missouri.  His family moved to Cayce
Kentucky when he was an infant and he subsequently grew up there. He worked for
several different railroads, including the Mobile & Ohio, which was the reason he
went to Jackson, Tennessee.  In those days Jackson was a rail center with four
railroad companies operating there.  While in Jackson he joined the Illinois Central.
He was nick-named Cayce because that was were he was from, Cayce, Kentucky.
Jones was known as "Cayce"  ~ , not "Casey" ~ .

Quote:
>I just hate it when people distort history, don't you?  :-)

Yes, I do. It drives me up the flippin'  wall.

 
 
 

Real Trains and Real Songs

Post by Fred Elli » Fri, 16 Feb 2001 07:28:48


Quote:


> (snipped)

> The "City of New Orleans" is about the train itself. It is about the "life and times"
> of the train.  It is philosophically and emotionally tied to the train as a corporeal
> entity.  The train is both a real train and a metaphorical one. The story (song) is
> an allegory.  That Goodman chose a real train to write about is a huge plus. IMO it
> is the best railroad song of all time.

> (Snipped)

For those who are interested, here are the lyrics for the song 'The City
of New Orleans'.

The City of New Orleans
by Steve Goodman

Riding on the City of New Orleans,
Illinois Central Monday morning rail
Fif*** cars and fif*** restless riders,
Three conductors and twenty-five sacks of mail.
All along the southbound odyssey
The train pulls out at Kankakee
Rolls along past houses, farms and fields.
Passin' trains that have no names,
Freight yards full of old black men
And the graveyards of the rusted automobiles.

CHORUS:
Good morning America how are you?
Don't you know me I'm your native son,
I'm the train they call The City of New Orleans,
I'll be gone five hundred miles when the day is done.

Dealin' card with the old men in the club car.
Penny a point ain't no one keepin' score.
Oh Won't you pass the paper bag that holds the bottle
Feel the wheels rumblin' 'neath the floor.
And the sons of pullman porters
And the sons of engineers
Ride their father's magic carpets made of steam.*
Mothers with their babes asleep,
Are rockin' to the gentle beat
And the rhythm of the rails is all they dream.*

CHORUS:

Nighttime on The City of New Orleans,
Changing cars in Memphis, Tennessee.
Half way home, we'll be there by morning
Through the Mississippi darkness
Rolling down to the sea.
And all the towns and people seem
To fade into a bad dream
And the steel rails still ain't heard the news.
The conductor sings his song again,
The passengers will please refrain
This train's got the disappearing railroad blues.

CHORUS:
Good night, America, how are you?
Don't you know me I'm your native son,
I'm the train they call The City of New Orleans,
I'll be gone five hundred miles when the day is done.

*Arlo Guthrie and others have substituted the word "steel" for "steam"
and "feel" for "dream"  

Fred Ellis
--
Who do you serve. . . .   And who do you trust?
(To e-mail me, remove the X from my address)