Best shelf benchwork method

Best shelf benchwork method

Post by Jac106 » Tue, 15 Jun 1999 04:00:00



Hi all-

Can anyone comment on various methods of attaching benchwork to a cinder block
wall? I am planning a narrow shelf-type railroad that may range from 3 in. to 2
ft. wide, along the walls of a 20x30 room. I was going to employ wood benchwork
but I am now wondering whether foam is the way to go. I have a lot of 2x4s and
plywood left over from my last layout, and wanted to use the most economical
choices here. Can foam on metal brackets offer adequate strength in HO? What
about attaching undertrack switch machines and other components to foam? I have
never worked with foam before.

While we're on the subject, how should roadbed be attached to foam, and what is
the easiest way to effect changes in track elevation? Any and all comments are
most welcome. Thanks.
Stuart

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Best shelf benchwork method

Post by Gerald Kruse, Jr » Tue, 15 Jun 1999 04:00:00



Quote:

> Hi all-

> Can anyone comment on various methods of attaching benchwork to a cinder
block
> wall? I am planning a narrow shelf-type railroad that may range from 3 in.
to 2
> ft. wide, along the walls of a 20x30 room. I was going to employ wood
benchwork
> but I am now wondering whether foam is the way to go. I have a lot of 2x4s
and
> plywood left over from my last layout, and wanted to use the most
economical
> choices here. Can foam on metal brackets offer adequate strength in HO?
What
> about attaching undertrack switch machines and other components to foam? I
have
> never worked with foam before.

> While we're on the subject, how should roadbed be attached to foam, and
what is
> the easiest way to effect changes in track elevation? Any and all comments
are
> most welcome. Thanks.
> Stuart

> Remove `spam-ex' to reply e-mail.

I am going to start construction on a new layout in my ba***t very soon.
My ba***t is of the poured variety, and I really didn't relish the idea of
putting anchors into the walls.  What I did do was construct stud walls
around the perimeter.  The stud walls are anchored to the floor and ceiling
joists.  I now have stable support to attach the layout to (unless a tornado
takes the house, in which case I guess the layout goes too).  Another point
too is that if you ever planned on finishing the ba***t (paneling,
drywall, etc.) then the framework is already there.  Plus you now have the
opportunity to install electrical recepticals at the locations you need
them.  I guess it would depend on whether you plan on making the layout a
permanent fixture and whether there's a chance of you ever changing
residences.

my 2 cents

Gerald Kruse Jr.
Hillsdale, MI

 
 
 

Best shelf benchwork method

Post by DHB » Tue, 15 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Hi!

I would agree with Gerald.  I am constructing a 10' X 25' layout in my
ba***t and started by finishing the ba***t with studs on 16" centers.  I
used an MR (Feb. 1999) article on the Arkansas & Missouri as a source of
much of my layout construction.  This article describes using studs to
create a shelf layout that uses foam insulation.  Everything you have
mentioned is covered in the article.  I just purchased the AMI Instant
Roadbed that is said to attach to foam with no problems.  If you are
interested I will let you know how it turns out.

Darren


Quote:



> > Hi all-

> > Can anyone comment on various methods of attaching benchwork to a cinder
> block
> > wall? I am planning a narrow shelf-type railroad that may range from 3
in.
> to 2
> > ft. wide, along the walls of a 20x30 room. I was going to employ wood
> benchwork
> > but I am now wondering whether foam is the way to go. I have a lot of
2x4s
> and
> > plywood left over from my last layout, and wanted to use the most
> economical
> > choices here. Can foam on metal brackets offer adequate strength in HO?
> What
> > about attaching undertrack switch machines and other components to foam?
I
> have
> > never worked with foam before.

> > While we're on the subject, how should roadbed be attached to foam, and
> what is
> > the easiest way to effect changes in track elevation? Any and all
comments
> are
> > most welcome. Thanks.
> > Stuart

> > Remove `spam-ex' to reply e-mail.

> I am going to start construction on a new layout in my ba***t very soon.
> My ba***t is of the poured variety, and I really didn't relish the idea
of
> putting anchors into the walls.  What I did do was construct stud walls
> around the perimeter.  The stud walls are anchored to the floor and
ceiling
> joists.  I now have stable support to attach the layout to (unless a
tornado
> takes the house, in which case I guess the layout goes too).  Another
point
> too is that if you ever planned on finishing the ba***t (paneling,
> drywall, etc.) then the framework is already there.  Plus you now have the
> opportunity to install electrical recepticals at the locations you need
> them.  I guess it would depend on whether you plan on making the layout a
> permanent fixture and whether there's a chance of you ever changing
> residences.

> my 2 cents

> Gerald Kruse Jr.
> Hillsdale, MI

 
 
 

Best shelf benchwork method

Post by Michael Watnosk » Wed, 16 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> Hi all-

> Can anyone comment on various methods of attaching benchwork to a cinder block
> wall? I am planning a narrow shelf-type railroad that may range from 3 in. to 2
> ft. wide, along the walls of a 20x30 room.

        A method that we used on our club layout me prove useful.  First seal
the cinderblock wall with waterproof paint like Dri-Lok.  This fills in
the texture and makes it easier to cover with light blue sky color
backdrop paint.  Otherwise, prepare a means to mount a backdrop.  We
constucted an L-girder with a 1x4 capped with a 1x3 and mounted this
directly to the wall using the blue screws designed for masonary
construction.  Buy the proper drill bit for these screws in the longest
lenght practical as if the screws bottom out, they tear off their
threads and lose their holding power.  A second L-girder is spaced the
width of the section with cross pieces on 16" centers and cantilevered
to the wall. This allow room for feet under the layout without kicking
legs and makes sweeping much easier.  We have sections up to 4 feet wide
that are strong enough to stand on.
        Hope this helps.
michael
 
 
 

Best shelf benchwork method

Post by MHintz11 » Wed, 16 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
>Can anyone comment on various methods of attaching benchwork to a cinder
>block
>wall?

I work in construction, and a method we use regularly isapply a liberal layer
of PL200 or Liquid Nails (PL is preferred; it seems to hold better) to the back
of a 2x4.  Place it into position, and then hammerdrill a 1/4" hole through the
2x4 into the cinder block.  Next, insert 2 or 3 16-penny common spikes into
each hole, and pound them in.  When the spikes go through the cinder block,
they spread out in the wall behind, sort of acting like a pop rivet.

My suggestion (and I have done this with several layouts) would be seal your
ba***t walls, and then to build an L-girder using a 2x4 for the web, and a
1x3 or 1x4 for the flange.  Install this around the perimeter of your ba***t
wherever the railroad will be attached to the walls.  If you need longer runs,
you can stagger your webs and flanges to make incredibly long L-girders.  You
can then add a second L-girder standing out from the wall by a foot or two,
parallel to the wall as needed, supported by its own legs every 4-6 feet.

Quote:
> I am now wondering whether foam is the way to go.

I have used foam on modules, and helped a friend build a layout out of foam.
My experience with it is that it is LOUD, no matter what you put on top of it.
I very much prefer a wood structure for my roadbed and supports, and if you
prefer, you can use the foam for scenery forms, especially near the front of
the railroad, as it offers some "give" while still supporting the scenery.
Foam is also relatively expensive compared to wood (especially since you
already have the wood), and you will create a lot more s***than you realize.

Marty

 
 
 

Best shelf benchwork method

Post by Jac106 » Thu, 17 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Thanks everyone. The suggestion for putting up studs seems a good one. My other
questions: Will putting nails/spike/screws into cinderblocks cause water leaks
from the outside into the ba***t?

Also, the base of my cinderblock walls don't meet the floor squarely, they
curve from wall to floor like a Tupperware container. Do I need to build the
stud walls out on the floor, and give up probably a foot of space from wall to
wall (sacrifice even an inch of layout acreage? Never!), or not? Thanks.

Stuart

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Best shelf benchwork method

Post by Jim McKeeve » Thu, 24 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Stuart,

I have a poured foundation, and I didn't want to deal with connecting to
the concrete, so I hung my benchwork from the floor joists!  Since my
layout is mostly 2' wide or less, and around the walls, this worked
fine.  When sub-roadbed was added, it was plenty strong.  I'll try to
draw what it looks like from the side:

           joist_______________
                 |
                 |
                 |
                 |
                 |
                 |
                 |
                 |
                 |_________
                 |    /
                 |   /
                 |  /
                 |/
                 |

It's made from 1x2's and 1x3's, put together with connector plates (I
made a jig so it would go fast).  The vertical part is about 5' long and
rests against the wall, even though it isn't attached to the wall, and
sub-roadbed is attached in the usual manner.  I screwed them into almost
every joist.  My backdrop is only 2" from the wall.  Simple and cheap!

Jim M

Quote:

> Thanks everyone. The suggestion for putting up studs seems a good one. My other
> questions: Will putting nails/spike/screws into cinderblocks cause water leaks
> from the outside into the ba***t?

> Also, the base of my cinderblock walls don't meet the floor squarely, they
> curve from wall to floor like a Tupperware container. Do I need to build the
> stud walls out on the floor, and give up probably a foot of space from wall to
> wall (sacrifice even an inch of layout acreage? Never!), or not? Thanks.

> Stuart

> Remove `spam-ex' to reply e-mail.

 
 
 

Best shelf benchwork method

Post by TOM » Thu, 24 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> Stuart,

> I have a poured foundation, and I didn't want to deal with connecting to
> the concrete, so I hung my benchwork from the floor joists!  Since my
> layout is mostly 2' wide or less, and around the walls, this worked
> fine.  When sub-roadbed was added, it was plenty strong.  I'll try to
> draw what it looks like from the side:

>            joist_______________
>                  |
>                  |
>                  |
>                  |
>                  |
>                  |
>                  |
>                  |
>                  |_________
>                  |    /
>                  |   /
>                  |  /
>                  |/
>                  |

> It's made from 1x2's and 1x3's, put together with connector plates (I
> made a jig so it would go fast).  The vertical part is about 5' long and
> rests against the wall, even though it isn't attached to the wall, and
> sub-roadbed is attached in the usual manner.  I screwed them into almost
> every joist.  My backdrop is only 2" from the wall.  Simple and cheap!

> Jim M


> > Thanks everyone. The suggestion for putting up studs seems a good one. My other
> > questions: Will putting nails/spike/screws into cinderblocks cause water leaks
> > from the outside into the ba***t?

> > Also, the base of my cinderblock walls don't meet the floor squarely, they
> > curve from wall to floor like a Tupperware container. Do I need to build the
> > stud walls out on the floor, and give up probably a foot of space from wall to
> > wall (sacrifice even an inch of layout acreage? Never!), or not? Thanks.

> > Stuart

> > Remove `spam-ex' to reply e-mail.

Looks and sounds like a great idea!!!

You might want to spike the bottom of the hanger to the wall to help
stabilize it, but when the weight of the subroadbed is cantilevered as
it is, it may be enough to steady it, not really sure...
--
<><><> TOM <><><>
-----------------