rr maps, layouts using gis

rr maps, layouts using gis

Post by mary » Mon, 08 Jan 2001 01:59:16



Is anybody using gis with their model rr layout?
Mary
 
 
 

rr maps, layouts using gis

Post by ken » Mon, 08 Jan 2001 14:15:41


Quote:

> Is anybody using gis with their model rr layout?

Sorry... what's "gis"?

 
 
 

rr maps, layouts using gis

Post by Mark Math » Mon, 08 Jan 2001 16:53:25


Quote:

> Sorry... what's "gis"?

It stands for Geographic Information System.  Kind of a buzz-word that the
prototype RRs use -- basically its a way to store and identify data according
to its actual location on the railroad. In a sense, you might think of it as
a "smart map."

For example, with a GIS a railroad could keep a database of their trackage,
with information on how old each section of track is, when it was last
inspected, ballasted, vertical clearance, speed rating, etc.

Normally, the database is accessed via a computer generated map that you can
click on specific items on the map and find out the data that is stored about
that item.  And the programs can usually do advanced types of analysis -- for
example is a wash-out or accident were to take a section of track out of
service between cities "A" and "B", a GIS program might be able to analyze
all of the information it has stored to determine the shortest or fastest
alternate route to connect "A" and "B" according to certain criteria -- for
example the alternate route must have bridges with a certain minimum load
rating, or perhaps a certain minimum vertical clearance, or a combination of
things.

It seems kind of an overkill for a model layout.

 
 
 

rr maps, layouts using gis

Post by ken » Tue, 09 Jan 2001 03:03:31


Ah. Thanks.

Does GIS have anything in common with GPS (Global positioning system)?
(... for real railroads, not models...  :^)   )

Quote:


> > Sorry... what's "gis"?

> It stands for Geographic Information System.  Kind of a buzz-word that the
> prototype RRs use -- basically its a way to store and identify data according
> to its actual location on the railroad. In a sense, you might think of it as
> a "smart map."

> For example, with a GIS a railroad could keep a database of their trackage,
> with information on how old each section of track is, when it was last
> inspected, ballasted, vertical clearance, speed rating, etc.

> Normally, the database is accessed via a computer generated map that you can
> click on specific items on the map and find out the data that is stored about
> that item.  And the programs can usually do advanced types of analysis -- for
> example is a wash-out or accident were to take a section of track out of
> service between cities "A" and "B", a GIS program might be able to analyze
> all of the information it has stored to determine the shortest or fastest
> alternate route to connect "A" and "B" according to certain criteria -- for
> example the alternate route must have bridges with a certain minimum load
> rating, or perhaps a certain minimum vertical clearance, or a combination of
> things.

> It seems kind of an overkill for a model layout.

 
 
 

rr maps, layouts using gis

Post by Mark Math » Tue, 09 Jan 2001 04:25:00


Quote:
ken wrote...
> Does GIS have anything in common with GPS (Global positioning system)?
> (... for real railroads, not models...  :^)   )

It might, it might not.  Since GIS is way of storing and retreiving
informaion based on location, and using GPS is a method of determing
locations, the two can work together.  For example, locos or other moving
equipment could be equipped with GPS (I thought I read recently in Railway
Age about some locos equipped with GPS receivers) to determine their
location, and this information updated in the GIS database.

But you certainly don't need to have one to have the other.

 
 
 

rr maps, layouts using gis

Post by Dave » Fri, 12 Jan 2001 00:15:42



Quote:

> > Sorry... what's "gis"?

> It stands for Geographic Information System.  Kind of a buzz-word that the
> prototype RRs use -- basically its a way to store and identify data according
> to its actual location on the railroad. In a sense, you might think of it as
> a "smart map."

A geographic information system is essentially a relational database
application with geographic features added.  A GIS application usually
has methods of displaying geographical features (areas, lines, points)
and has methods of allowing the user to see the data linked to these
features. The data and graphical features are stored in tables along with
other files (a typical "table" in ArcView has 5 files associated with it
and one of those 5 is a .dbf formatted file).  The graphic features allow
for a variety of selection and analysis tools that standard databases do
not provide.

Try http://www.gis.com/ for more information.

Dave

--
_________________________________________
http://southern-railway.railfan.net/ay/
http://smrf.railfan.net/SMRF/
http://cvrr.railfan.net/cvmrr/

 
 
 

rr maps, layouts using gis

Post by Dave » Fri, 12 Jan 2001 00:15:40




Quote:
> Is anybody using gis with their model rr layout?
> Mary

No, but I did use it for making a map of the prototype I'm modeling. Some
people buy the Delorme 3-D topo maps of the region they model to get
ideas.

The GIS would be less helpful than CAD programs.  There are several
specific to model railroad design, including CADrail and 3rdPlanIt.

Dave
--
_________________________________________
http://southern-railway.railfan.net/ay/
http://smrf.railfan.net/SMRF/
http://cvrr.railfan.net/cvmrr/

 
 
 

rr maps, layouts using gis

Post by BOCO » Fri, 12 Jan 2001 12:34:59


I found a fantastic site that contains very detailed maps at:

www.maptech.com

Lots of stuff that is not here anymore still listed.

Brian Crase
Raleigh, NC
Member N. Raleigh Model RR Club
http://trainweb.org/nrmrc

 
 
 

rr maps, layouts using gis

Post by BOB SCHWART » Fri, 12 Jan 2001 14:14:32


Thank you Brian! Very useful site.

Bob Schwartz


Quote:
> I found a fantastic site that contains very detailed maps at:

> www.maptech.com

> Lots of stuff that is not here anymore still listed.

> Brian Crase
> Raleigh, NC
> Member N. Raleigh Model RR Club
> http://trainweb.org/nrmrc