Help beginer with PRR STEAM questions

Help beginer with PRR STEAM questions

Post by JEFF ZELL NK » Thu, 13 Feb 1992 04:12:43



        What PRR steam engines were in use from 1900 - phase out?

        What time era does the Spectrum HO passenger car series come
        from?

        When did the Reading Railroad gow out of business?

        Thanks for the News Group!

        Jeff

 
 
 

Help beginer with PRR STEAM questions

Post by Dave Piers » Thu, 13 Feb 1992 03:26:10




Quote:
>    What PRR steam engines were in use from 1900 - phase out?

        Thats a kind of long list.  With at least three possible classes of
        answers:
                Which class, by wheel arrangement?
                Which class by PRR Class (mostly related to wheel arrangment)?
                Which _specific_ engines, by engine numner (say, for lettering
]               the engines.)?

        PRR is covered by a massive number of books, the "Pennsy Power" titles
        spring to mind.  There is alos the OPennsyvaniay RR Historical &
        Technical Society.  It would help if "we" knew what you were looking
        for.

thanks
dave pierson                    |the facts, as accurately as i can manage,
Digital Equipment Corporation   |the opinions, my own.
600 Nickerson Rd
Marlboro, Mass

"He has read everything, and, to his credit, written nothing."  A J Raffles

 
 
 

Help beginer with PRR STEAM questions

Post by carl.a.benev » Thu, 13 Feb 1992 21:59:09



Quote:
>    When did the Reading Railroad gow out of business?

The Reading, Penn Central(PRR & NYC), Erie Lackawanna, Central RR of NJ,
and others became CONRAIL on April 1, 1976.
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Help beginer with PRR STEAM questions

Post by Ralph Marsha » Fri, 14 Feb 1992 02:11:32



Quote:

>    What PRR steam engines were in use from 1900 - phase out?

As Dave Pierson pointed out, this is a _huge_ question, and getting
one of the many decent books about the subject would be a wise plan.
However, since I've already done much of this research, I'll pass on
the highlights and you can fill in the details.  Note that Bowser
makes a nearly complete line of kits and RTR locomotives, almost all
of which are replicas of PRR engines.  Their catalog has lots of
pictures and a short historical blurb about each one.  Highly
recommended.

I'm mostly familiar with the era from WWI to the end of steam, so
you'll need another source for the pre-WWI stuff.

Passenger locomotives:
----------------------

E6 Atlantic 4-4-2, replaced in the 20s(?) by the K4s

K4s 4-6-2 The standard PRR passenger loco, also in streamlined
        versions.

T1 4-4-4-4 Streamlined, probably the most awesome looking thing
        Raymond Loewy ever put his mind to.  Designed to be fast, and
        produced in a run of either 50 or 100 just before WWII.  Not
        very successful.

Other attempts at late-era steam, such as Q1, S1 and S2, were mostly
prototypes and none of them were sufficiently successful to stave off
the entry of diesels.

Freight locomotives:
--------------------

A5, B6 Shifters (switchers on other RRs) A5 is 0-4-0, B6 is 0-6-0.

H9, H10 2-8-0 Consolidations.  Older freight locos, kept around until
the Depression.

I1 2-10-0 Decapod.  PRR about the only one to keep these running until
the end of steam.  Slow drag loco, designed to get coal over the
mountains, which is basically what the PRR was about.

N1 2-10-2 Don't know much about this.

M1, M1a 2-8-4(??) Mountain.  Another of the big freight locos, but
faster than the I1, also very successful.

L1 and J1, which I think were the 2-6-4 Light and Heavy Pacific, but
I'm not really sure.

Quote:
>    What time era does the Spectrum HO passenger car series come
>    from?

These are known as "heavyweights," as they were steel cars that
replaced the line of wooden cars used previously.  I know that they
were phased out of the prestige trains shortly before WWII, as that
was when the streamlining craze produced "lighweight" streamline cars.
However, the heavyweights were used on many other trains until
passenger traffic started dropping and the older cars could be retired
without needing replacements.  I believe that they were first
introduced in the early 1900s, since I think one motivation for
developing the E-6 Atlantic loco was to haul the resulting heavier
trains.  However, this is more speculative on my part.

"The characters in this book are imaginary, and resemblances to them,
if any, borne by actual persons or corpses are accidental and in some
cases deplorable." - Disclaimer in "The Silent Speaker" by Rex Stout

 
 
 

Help beginer with PRR STEAM questions

Post by Michael Stim » Sat, 15 Feb 1992 06:54:08


Quote:


>>        What PRR steam engines were in use from 1900 - phase out?

>As Dave Pierson pointed out, this is a _huge_ question, and getting
>one of the many decent books about the subject would be a wise plan.
>However, since I've already done much of this research, I'll pass on
>the highlights and you can fill in the details.  Note that Bowser

Ordinarily I don't bother to correct information posted by others,
but this reply has too many errors of fact to let it pass.

Quote:
>Passenger locomotives:
>----------------------

>E6 Atlantic 4-4-2, replaced in the 20s(?) by the K4s

The K-4s superceded, but did not "replace" the E6s. The Es
continued running (with shorter trains) until nearly the end of steam.
Many of them were used for work-train service well into the '50s.

Quote:
>K4s 4-6-2 The standard PRR passenger loco, also in streamlined
>    versions.

True, however, there were only five streamlined K4s out of total
class of about 425 engines.

Quote:
>T1 4-4-4-4 Streamlined, probably the most awesome looking thing
>    Raymond Loewy ever put his mind to.  Designed to be fast, and
>    produced in a run of either 50 or 100 just before WWII.  Not
>    very successful.

There were 52 T-1s.

Also not mentioned  are the class D (4-4-0) and the class G (4-6-0)
both of which were important types on the Pennsy, in passenger service.

Quote:
>Other attempts at late-era steam, such as Q1, S1 and S2, were mostly
>prototypes and none of them were sufficiently successful to stave off
>the entry of diesels.

They were all prototypes, not "mostly"; there was only one of
each class.  These were freight locomotives, not passenger.
The Q-2 (4-4-6-4) was quite successful.

Quote:
>Freight locomotives:
>--------------------

>A5, B6 Shifters (switchers on other RRs) A5 is 0-4-0, B6 is 0-6-0.

Also the C-1 class (0-8-0).

Quote:
>H9, H10 2-8-0 Consolidations.  Older freight locos, kept around until
>the Depression.

Also, the H-8 class.  The assertion that they were "kept around
until the depression" is highly misleading. The various H classes
were in service into the mid-'50s.

Quote:
>I1 2-10-0 Decapod.  PRR about the only one to keep these running until
>the end of steam.  Slow drag loco, designed to get coal over the
>mountains, which is basically what the PRR was about.
>N1 2-10-2 Don't know much about this.

Also the N-2 class. The N types were heavy freight drag locos.

Quote:
>M1, M1a 2-8-4(??) Mountain.  Another of the big freight locos, but
>faster than the I1, also very successful.

The various M types (or Mountains) have the 4-8-2 wheel arrangment
not 2-8-4.  The 2-8-4 arrangement (Berkshire) was used by many
roads, but not by the Pennsy.

The Ms were dual-service (passenger and freight) locos.

Quote:
>L1 and J1, which I think were the 2-6-4 Light and Heavy Pacific, but
>I'm not really sure.

This is really off-the-wall!

First, there is no such thing as a "2-6-4 Light and Heavy Pacific"!
A Pacific has a 4-6-2 wheel arrangement. (the K-4 is a Pacific, e.g.)
Second, there is (except for *** exceptions) NO 2-6-4 type in
North American railroading.

The L-1 (2-8-2) is a heavy-duty freight locomotive. (Mikado type)
The J-1 (2-10-4) is a very heavy duty freight loco. (Texas type)

Also, add the F class (2-6-0) which was an early light
freight locomotive. These did not last until the '50s.

The information I've provided above is based on the book
_Pennsy Power_ by Al Staufer.

Michael Stimac
--
Michael Stimac
(408) 922-7539

These opinions are not necessarily anyone's but my own.