Material Used for Turnout Throwbars?

Material Used for Turnout Throwbars?

Post by Mr. Bl » Sat, 06 Jan 1996 04:00:00



For those of you that handlay your  own turnouts:
What material do yu use for he throwbar? Where do you acquire it?
How do you attach the points to it?  On a side note, how do you
hinge your points?

If  wanted to use a rectangular, thick slab of plastic for the job, where
could I purchase it?

Thanks,
Chris

 
 
 

Material Used for Turnout Throwbars?

Post by David_Gibbon » Sun, 07 Jan 1996 04:00:00


The Somona County Model Railroad Society (Yet another shameless plug)
used Clover Product's throwbar stock. It is made of PC board material,
and worked well on our handlaid code 83 turnouts. The PC board material
made it easy to connect ground throws, as we could solder to the
throwbars.

Good luck,

David Gibbons

 
 
 

Material Used for Turnout Throwbars?

Post by JScor » Sun, 07 Jan 1996 04:00:00


Quote:
>What material do yu use for he throwbar?

I model in O-Scale and use Right-O'-Way cast brass throw bars.

Quote:
>Where do you acquire it?

Right-O'-Way is in Chowchilla, CA (209-665-1001

Quote:
>How do you attach the points to it?

The ends of the throwbar each have a clevis with cast in holes
that mate with a flange on their cast barss points.   Incidentally,
The points require absolutely NO filing.

Quote:
>On a side note, how do you hinge your points?

There are rail joint plates cast on the end of each point.  

By the way.   I always use an insulated throw bar and wire each
point to its respective stock rail.  This requires electrically
isolating the point from the closure rail.   By making the point the
same polarity as the stock rail all momentary short circuits are
avoided if the wheel flange touches the point when traversing the
switch.   This is a big advantage if you are using command control.
Jim Scorse
North Coast Engineering

 
 
 

Material Used for Turnout Throwbars?

Post by Gordon Helbe » Mon, 08 Jan 1996 04:00:00


We us "PCB ties".  They are strips of copper clad printed board material.  
We solder the points to the tie.  For isolated points, cut a gap in the clad,
otherwise, for hot frogs, leave the points connected.

For connecting the points to the rails, we use standard joiner material, cut
to a little over 1/4".

This method has proven to provide good service.  There are two paths normally
for electrical path to the points.  Against the stock rail and from the frog.
For cases where gaps are required, you may want to connect a wire jumper from the
points to a set of contacts.


Quote:

>For those of you that handlay your  own turnouts:
>What material do yu use for he throwbar? Where do you acquire it?
>How do you attach the points to it?  On a side note, how do you
>hinge your points?

>If  wanted to use a rectangular, thick slab of plastic for the job, where
>could I purchase it?

>Thanks,
>Chris

 
 
 

Material Used for Turnout Throwbars?

Post by al sharf » Mon, 08 Jan 1996 04:00:00


I've used square plastic shapes from Plastruct (or Evergreen) for throw
bar material.  Works well.  I model 1/2" scale so I can use a***to
secure the points.

For a hinge I use rail joiners with the sides cut down.  But securing the
throw bar between two ties the points don't creep forward, and out of the
joiners.

 
 
 

Material Used for Turnout Throwbars?

Post by Rick Sho » Tue, 09 Jan 1996 04:00:00


The cheapest throwbar material is PC Board. Cut it into tie width and a
1/ in longer than normal tie.

Solder a small tab to under side of each rail point sticking inward.
fasten tie in its grove you have made in homosote roadbed, clamp one point
against stock rail with spring clothespin, drill 2-80 or 2-90 clearance hole
through tab and pc tie,
take the other point, put the NMRA Standards gage in the right spot to
achieve correct wheel clearance for the point, drill hole through tab and
tie. Solder pan head brass screws through the tabs and use double nuts on
under side of tie. Leave an rch of clearance and there you are.

Some people silver solder the tabs in place.

Regards....Rick

 
 
 

Material Used for Turnout Throwbars?

Post by Rick Sho » Sun, 14 Jan 1996 04:00:00


If you are in HO:...Consider building your turnouts like the prototype
railroads are doing these days.

That is continous rails from the frog all the way to the points.
Electrical problems are resolved by cutting the rails BEHIND the frog.

I use printed circuit board without the copper foil on it. Bare phoenal
board. Radio Shack carries it. Some Shack stores even have it cut into
tie widths. You'll need a long piece. Wants to stick out on both sides of
switch to give support.

I hard solder small tabs to underside of each point. the tab should stick
out on both sides of point. One side will slip under stock rail for much
better contact and other (inner) side will be drilled for an oo-90***
that will also go through the tie strip. Use a double jam nut on the
***because a small amount of looseness is needed.  Be sure to use the
NMRA Standard Track Gage between the point and stock rail to give the
right clearance for the wheel to pass without touching the open point.

Also be very sure the Standards gage is used between the guard rail and
stock rail to keep the wheels on the correct rail.

Hard solder is slightly higher melting point temp solder than "normal". A
good hardware store of a well stocked hobby shop or Walthers Catalog will
carry this higher melting temp solder.

What I have described is not quick, but good craftsmanship never is. I
suggest you make a jig on a piece of wood with small nails to align the
parts of the rails. Make one for #6 and #8. Also consider making one for
curved turnouts. I saw some # 20 curved ones. They really looked slick.

Kalmbach has published several very good books on track laying. Well
worth the small amount of money. ($5-$10 range)

Regards....................Rick Shoup, MMR

 
 
 

Material Used for Turnout Throwbars?

Post by Dennis Rockwe » Thu, 18 Jan 1996 04:00:00



Quote:

>If you are in HO:...Consider building your turnouts like the prototype
>railroads are doing these days.

>That is continous rails from the frog all the way to the points.
>Electrical problems are resolved by cutting the rails BEHIND the frog.

The only problem with this is that when metal wheelsets are
out of gauge, there is a possibility of a short if a wheel
touches both the stock and point rails.  This is even more
likely with wide-tread wheels found on some equipment.

 I suspect that this is one reason why Shinohara makes the
throw distance so large on their N scale turnouts, to widen
the distance between these rails.
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