Question on Quick Method of Handlaying Track and Tunrnouts

Question on Quick Method of Handlaying Track and Tunrnouts

Post by DLChambe » Wed, 30 Oct 1996 04:00:00




... it also discussed using hot melt glue to secure handlayed rail
to ties...even for switches!
<<<

After you go thru all the troubble of gluing and sanding and restaining,
you would have been better off using spikes!!!

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
Opinions expressed are my own, unless you agree, then they're yours, too!
I'm a member of the Palo Alto Model Railroad Club   http://www.pamrrc.org

 
 
 

Question on Quick Method of Handlaying Track and Tunrnouts

Post by Les Archule » Wed, 30 Oct 1996 04:00:00


I read an article "Using Foamboard Raodbed" by Eric Lindburg in the June
1992 issue of Railroad Model Craftsman.  Although the title advocates
foamboad, it also discussed using hot melt glue to secure handlayed rail
to ties...even for switches!  You have to use some spikes opposite of the
point closure on switches though.

The idea as I understood it was as follows:

   Clean rail with rubbing alchohol

   Using a glue gun with the tip slightly modified, apply a bead of glue
to the rail and let cool.  Make these individual peices of rail in
batches.

   Glue the pre-stained ties already in place on the roadbed.

   Block sand and touch up the stain on the glued ties.

   Fix the rail to the ties using a 80 Watt soldering iron to reheat the
rail glue.

   Do 3-6 inches of rail at a time.

Obviously there are many details I left out of the breif so check out this
issue for a better description.  The artlicle is directed toward HO scale,
but I am working in On3 using the same code track as HO.  It sounds like a
potentially excellent way to handlay.  

My questions to anyone who tried this are:  

   How productive can you become?

   Has this method  stood the test of time?

   Any snags, tips or potential pitfalls?

   Has anyoune modified this technique to facilitate production?

Thanks

Les

 
 
 

Question on Quick Method of Handlaying Track and Tunrnouts

Post by Fritz Milhaup » Thu, 31 Oct 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> I read an article "Using Foamboard Raodbed" by Eric Lindburg in the June
> 1992 issue of Railroad Model Craftsman.  Although the title advocates
> foamboad, it also discussed using hot melt glue to secure handlayed rail
> to ties...even for switches!

I dunno, but I've seen too many hot glue jobs on other things such
as lumber loads that haven't held up to heat and humidity
variations (very important when ya lives in Michigan!) for more than a
few months.  Maybe they just didn't get the glue hot enough?

Many years back, my brother and I tried the similar method that uses
Pliobond or Goo.  The rail didn't stay in place very well over a several
month trial period.

-fm

Preserving the memory of the Pere Marquette- route of the U.S.'s first
all-new post-WWII streamliner.

 
 
 

Question on Quick Method of Handlaying Track and Tunrnouts

Post by Steve Benezr » Thu, 31 Oct 1996 04:00:00


Quote:


> > I read an article "Using Foamboard Raodbed" by Eric Lindburg in the June
> > 1992 issue of Railroad Model Craftsman.  Although the title advocates
> > foamboad, it also discussed using hot melt glue to secure handlayed rail
> > to ties...even for switches!

> I dunno, but I've seen too many hot glue jobs on other things such
> as lumber loads that haven't held up to heat and humidity
> variations (very important when ya lives in Michigan!) for more than a
> few months.  Maybe they just didn't get the glue hot enough?

> Many years back, my brother and I tried the similar method that uses
> Pliobond or Goo.  The rail didn't stay in place very well over a several
> month trial period.

> -fm

> Preserving the memory of the Pere Marquette- route of the U.S.'s first
> all-new post-WWII streamliner.

I live in North Carolina and deal with radical changes in temperature
and humidity.  I have used the glue gun handlaying track method with
success.  Make sure a 100 watt or more soldering iron or resistance
soldering unit is used for melting the glue when gluing the rail to
wooden ties.  The glue gun method is terrific for quickly "handlaying"
track and turnouts.

Steve

 
 
 

Question on Quick Method of Handlaying Track and Tunrnouts

Post by roger travi » Thu, 31 Oct 1996 04:00:00


I anyone says that handlaying track is too dificult, I just mention that I
have only one eye and that one isn't too s**t hot at the best of times
and I handlay all my visible track.

If I can do it, anyone can!

Cheers
Roger Traviss

From sunny Victoria, BC   Canada

 
 
 

Question on Quick Method of Handlaying Track and Tunrnouts

Post by Mike Davis » Fri, 01 Nov 1996 04:00:00


Quote:


> > I read an article "Using Foamboard Raodbed" by Eric Lindburg in the June
> > 1992 issue of Railroad Model Craftsman.  Although the title advocates
> > foamboad, it also discussed using hot melt glue to secure handlayed rail
>> > to ties...even for switches!

> I dunno, but I've seen too many hot glue jobs on other things such
> as lumber loads that haven't held up to heat and humidity
> variations (very important when ya lives in Michigan!) for more than a
> few months.  Maybe they just didn't get the glue hot enough?

> Many years back, my brother and I tried the similar method that uses
> Pliobond or Goo.  The rail didn't stay in place very well over a several
> month trial period.

I've used glue to hand-lay track with great success. It's held up very
well to rough moves, storage and wide temperate swings. Here are a few
suggestions:

    1) Attach wiring to the rail before placing it. I like to solder
       a wire to the bottom of each rail.

    2) Prebend the rail. Don't depend on the glue to hold the rail to
       a particular shape.

    3) Apply a liberal coat of glue (I use Pliobond) and let it dry
       completely before placing it on the ties.

    4) Finally, hold the rail in place using your favorite 3-point
       track gauge while _quickly_ touching the rail with a hot
       solder iron. It's takes a bit of practice, but you want to
       just soften/melt the glue - not burn it off.

That's it. It make fast work of hand-laid trackwork and the results
are very nice to look at as there are no GIANT track spikes in every
sixth tie.

Note: I'm assuming we're talking about HO or N scale here. If you're
using a larger scale you can get spikes that have heads which are the
correct size and will be noticably absent if ommitted. So, for O scale
and larger (not sure about S) you should probably use 4 spikes per tie.

cheers,
Mike Davison

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