Wtd:Plans of Test run Track

Wtd:Plans of Test run Track

Post by Heathe » Mon, 22 Dec 1997 04:00:00



Have been told he went out of business,,no one knows who he is,,,so does
any one out there have one of these test run tracks or plans I can get a
copy of???,,,It seems to me it was about 18" inches long,hardwood base and
a 4 to 6 inch section of reg track recessed in at each end,,w/the center
portion being adjustiable to various wheel configurations,,the foggy part
is the center,,beleive it might of been berings of some sort,thatwere
moveable,,,Help    Heather

 
 
 

Wtd:Plans of Test run Track

Post by Mike Bauer » Thu, 25 Dec 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> Have been told he went out of business,,no one knows who he is,,,so does
> any one out there have one of these test run tracks or plans I can get a
> copy of???,,,It seems to me it was about 18" inches long,hardwood base and
> a 4 to 6 inch section of reg track recessed in at each end,,w/the center
> portion being adjustiable to various wheel configurations,,the foggy part
> is the center,,beleive it might of been berings of some sort,thatwere
> moveable,,,Help    Heather

Oh yes,...

the Precision Manufacturing roller test track. That was made with pairs
of rollers that would look much like 'H's, when viewed from the end.
Those pairs were mounted in sections of 'U' brackets. One side of the
rollers were made of something like a plastic or nylon. So you had an
insulated side to the roller pairs. You had power to both sides of the
end rails with an alligator clip-lead to attach to the frame of the
engine undertest. The rollers would sit on a strip of some metal,
(brass?) that was wired to the right side of the track. Convention is
that the right side of the rail is used as the insulated... Well, at
least I think that is the case....side of the units power pickup. If
not, at least the clip to the frame would make up for the roller sets
feeding power to only one side of the locomotive.

So that was it, fully powered track at the ends, rollers that would feed
the power on only one side, and a jumper clip to attach to the frame or
tender pickup point of the locomotive.

Explains why the test track was built-up on a piece of wood.

You could make one of those if you really needed one. Going to need a
few tools, a drill-stand and vice at the very least. Think of making it
with a lot of nested brass and plastic tubing on metal rods, mounted in
some pieces of 'U' channel.

If you have ever worked with fixtures or made a simple jig with some
s***plastic, you know enough to make uniform parts. That's the hardest
part, making batches of uniform parts. Simple jigs make it a snap.

Know someone with a few machine tools and you have it made. A small
lathe, or freind with one, will really simplify the project.

Know someone that might like to have one of the test tracks and has the
machinery? Cut a deal with him and help him make two of them. One for
you and one for him.