An age-old problem: how to get accurate GN paint colors?

An age-old problem: how to get accurate GN paint colors?

Post by Clark Coop » Wed, 08 May 1996 04:00:00



OK, folks, there's gotta be a way!  How can I get accurate and consistent
GN green and orange paint?  I've often seen references which refer to
Pullman Green and Omaha Orange.  Well, it seems to me that GN had the
brownest Pullman Green ever, looking at those GN Color Pictorials and
other sources.  And what the hell is Omaha Orange, anyway?  I'm accustomed
to using Floquil paint, and would be interested in mixing formulas.
But I know Floquil isn't exactly a shining example of consistency.  ;^)
I would be glad to try other brands of paint if I can get reasonbly
consistent colors.  I picked up samples of Modelflex GN Green and GN Orange.
This green seems to be a better match to the pictures I have seen
(much browner than Pullman Green); and the orange seems fairly close, too.
But I don't know for sure if they are really correct.
Any help would be appreciated!  Please post to this group.
--

                IMU Information Systems, The University of Iowa

 
 
 

An age-old problem: how to get accurate GN paint colors?

Post by Trevor Marshal » Wed, 08 May 1996 04:00:00


Try checking out the following site... it has floquil formulas for paints
for most railroads in North America.

http://www.fileshop.com/personal/jashaw/rrdata/floqu2.txt

- Trevor Marshall, Ottawa Canada

 
 
 

An age-old problem: how to get accurate GN paint colors?

Post by andrew harmanta » Thu, 09 May 1996 04:00:00


from the GN stuff I've seen, you can use any dark pullman green for new
equipment.  yes, it faded to a browner color.  the orange is more
problematic.  the traditional reefer orange is not the color.  the
GN's orange had more red in it.  your best bet is to use good color
photographs for reference and find the brand that comes the closest.  ,
the colors that are coming out in the new series of water-based acrylics
are pretty accurate, especially the new line from floquil.

 
 
 

An age-old problem: how to get accurate GN paint colors?

Post by andrew harmanta » Thu, 09 May 1996 04:00:00


from the GN stuff I've seen, you can use any dark pullman green for new
equipment.  yes, it faded to a browner color.  the orange is more
problematic.  the traditional reefer orange is not the color.  the
GN's orange had more red in it.  your best bet is to use good color
photographs for reference and find the brand that comes the closest.  ,
the colors that are coming out in the new series of water-based acrylics
are pretty accurate, especially the new line from floquil.

 
 
 

An age-old problem: how to get accurate GN paint colors?

Post by Tim O'Conno » Fri, 10 May 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> OK, folks, there's gotta be a way!  How can I get accurate and consistent
> GN green and orange paint?

The GN historical society has peridiocally had articles on mixing paints
for GN, and there are also references that have the Dupont Duco or Pentone
(?) numbers. Those numbers can be taken to an auto paint supplier who can
custom mix auto lacquer for you, for about $15 a pint. (I haven't done it
but this advice has been published by historical societies.)

Last year an issue of the "Goat" had a recipe for mixing Accupaint to match
the GN colors for an Alco FA-2 project. If you join the society, most back
issues are available.

For myself, I found that the Scalecoat Empire Builder Orange and Green were
a dead-on match to a faded GN express boxcar that was sitting in the sun in
Denver in 1991. For newer paint, I added Engine Black to the Green to make
it darker, and a very small amount of Roof Brown. Scalecoat also makes a GN
Green which I think is a dark olive color for heavyweight cars.

 
 
 

An age-old problem: how to get accurate GN paint colors?

Post by Clark Coop » Sat, 11 May 1996 04:00:00


Thanks to all who responded to my request!  The web pages containing Floquil
formulas were particularly helpful; Thanks Trevor.  FYI they're at:

http://www.fileshop.com/personal/jashaw/rrdata/

Now, if I can just find some time to do a little mixing...
--

                IMU Information Systems, The University of Iowa