HO Big Boy

HO Big Boy

Post by da.. » Tue, 23 Mar 1999 04:00:00



Quote:
>The Big Boy I was looking at was the Rivarossi.  Since this engine will look
>stupid running around "sharp" curves, I kind of figured that after much
>searching, can someone give me an idea of a wheel configuration that will
>work well down to about 24 inch radius.  I am still looking for a steam
>engine from the early to mid 1900's.

>I thank you for all the help earlier.

Bryan:

One of the reasons prototype mallet engines were built was their
ability to negotiate tight curves (lower bridge loading was the other
'big reason').  Most the models will negotiate tight curves -
particularly if you keep the speed low - but there will be excessive
boiler overhang on curves.  This 'overhang' problem may be what other
responders are referring to when they suggest that it may look
unrealistic.

If you had a 2-6-6-2, it would have a shorter boiler and much less
overhang and more realistic appearance than the 'Big Boy' you
mentioned earlier. 2-6-6-2's built in the early 1900's frequently had
a boiler that was about the same size as a modern 2-8-2.  Most
2-6-6-2's had small drive wheels for drag service. They were
frequently used in switching yards and negotiated tight curves with
ease. These same qualities should translate into a well designed
model. In theory, a 2-6-6-2 should be able to negotiate the same
curves as a 2-6-2 'Prairie' or even an 0-6-0 switcher -- pretty sharp
stuff.  And excessive boiler overhang shouldn't be a problem. FWIW,
2-6-6-2's were the most popular mallet wheel arrangement built.

The 'Big Boy' in your original message was a mainline locomotive -
used for high speed freight and even passenger service in a very
particular section of UP's main line.  A model of the UP Challenger
would be slightly shorter but it was also a very large locomotive
intended for mainline service.  

                        dave

 
 
 

HO Big Boy

Post by Arnold 2 » Tue, 23 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Bryan,
I used to have 18" and 22" radius on my old layout. Both the Big Boy and
Challengers that I own ran easily around both. The Challengers look best on a
22" but still have minor overhang. Big Boys have more of course. What I did
until I could construct a new layout was I positioned buildings and scenery
close to the curves to conceal this as much as possible. I even made a tunnel
on one curve. Just make sure you provide enough clearance for the overhang.

Scott
Somewhere in Nebraska

 
 
 

HO Big Boy

Post by Mark Ayliff » Wed, 24 Mar 1999 04:00:00



Quote:
> Bryan,
> I used to have 18" and 22" radius on my old layout. Both the Big Boy and
> Challengers that I own ran easily around both. The Challengers look best
on a
> 22" but still have minor overhang. Big Boys have more of course. What I
did
> until I could construct a new layout was I positioned buildings and
scenery
> close to the curves to conceal this as much as possible. I even made a
tunnel
> on one curve. Just make sure you provide enough clearance for the
overhang.

> Scott
> Somewhere in Nebraska

I have a similar experience with my Rivarossi Big Boy. Though I am
reorganising my layout with minimum 36" on the main, this is not for the Big
Boy, but so that I can arrange long trains to run OK.

If you intend to run FEF's as well then just be aware that in some
circumstances the loading can be wider than for a Big Boy. Those smoke
deflectors certainly add to the width, and it's higher up.

Mark

 
 
 

HO Big Boy

Post by jale » Wed, 24 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

>The Big Boy I was looking at was the Rivarossi.  Since this engine will look
>stupid running around "sharp" curves, I kind of figured that after much
>searching, can someone give me an idea of a wheel configuration that will
>work well down to about 24 inch radius.  I am still looking for a steam
>engine from the early to mid 1900's.

>I thank you for all the help earlier.

>Bryan

Bryan,

        By "early to mid 1900's", I presume you mean 1900-1950, and not 1900-1905.

        In any case, assuming no particular prototype, I'd buy the Bachmann Spectrum 2-8-0
for light duty branchline work, industrial switching, and possibly yard switching.  I'd
wait for the rumored Proto2000 USRA 0-8-0 to use as a yard switcher.  I'd buy the Athearn
USRA 2-8-2 for mainline freight.  If you don't mind the slightly oversized flanges, you
can use the IHC 2-6-0 for branchline work, and their USRA 2-8-2 for freight and USRA 4-6-2
for passenger service.  You could also use their 4-8-2 for heavy mainline freight.

Regards,

-Jeff

--

                                                        my everything.

 
 
 

HO Big Boy

Post by Rrlv » Sun, 28 Mar 1999 04:00:00


If you want to model early steam, you should
look at 2-6-0, 2-8-0, 4-6-0,...
 If you like to model  big steam, you need  at
least a 50" radius curve, in H.O.
 Big articulates take up alot of room in curves.
 
 
 

HO Big Boy

Post by LarEym » Sun, 28 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

>If you want to model early steam, you should
>look at 2-6-0, 2-8-0, 4-6-0,...
> If you like to model  big steam, you need  at
>least a 50" radius curve, in H.O.
> Big articulates take up alot of room in curves.

OH please guys. The reason the articulateds were built was so they could get
around tight curves. If you want to run articulateds go ahead  :-)

Larry at Papas Trains
http://members.aol.com/lareyman

 
 
 

HO Big Boy

Post by Lone-Gunma » Sun, 28 Mar 1999 04:00:00


on 24 inch curves?  Try a 2-6-0 or maybe a 4-8-2.  I wouldn't go larger than
that on those radius curves.
 
 
 

HO Big Boy

Post by trew » Mon, 29 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> on 24 inch curves?  Try a 2-6-0 or maybe a 4-8-2.  I wouldn't go larger than
> that on those radius curves.

Let's not forget that a modern passenger train, going 80 mph, requires a
turn that scales out to a 15 FOOT radius in HO.
Now does the difference between 30" and 26" really seem so important?
--
Tim Trewhella

http://www.bestweb.net/~trew
"I will not hang doughnuts on my person."
-Bart Simpson on the blackboard
 
 
 

HO Big Boy

Post by trew » Mon, 29 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> on 24 inch curves?  Try a 2-6-0 or maybe a 4-8-2.  I wouldn't go larger than
> that on those radius curves.

Let's not forget that a modern passenger train, going 80 mph, requires a
turn that scales out to a 15 FOOT radius in HO.
Now does the difference between 30" and 26" really seem so important?
--
Tim Trewhella

http://www.bestweb.net/~trew
"I will not hang doughnuts on my person."
-Bart Simpson on the blackboard
 
 
 

HO Big Boy

Post by Foger » Mon, 29 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Tell 'em Larry!>Subject: re. Big Boys
Quote:

>Date: 3/26/99 11:09 PM Pacific Standard Time

>>If you want to model early steam, you should
>>look at 2-6-0, 2-8-0, 4-6-0,...
>> If you like to model  big steam, you need  at
>>least a 50" radius curve, in H.O.
>> Big articulates take up alot of room in curves.

>OH please guys. The reason the articulateds were built was so they could get
>around tight curves. If you want to run articulateds go ahead  :-)

>Larry at Papas Trains
>http://members.aol.com/lareyman