2-stroke or 4-stroke

2-stroke or 4-stroke

Post by eric.jin.. » Fri, 15 Oct 1999 04:00:00



I'm building my first airplane, Great Planes Trainer 40.  I am looking
for suggestions on an engine.  Considering the Tower Hobbies .46 but
would like input on using a 4-stroke.  What 4-stroke size would be
equivalent to a .46?  Would you recommend a 4-stroke for someone new to
the hobby?

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

 
 
 

2-stroke or 4-stroke

Post by Patricio W. Concha Erilki » Fri, 15 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Nopes ... :(

... 4 strokes sounds better and nicer, are strong and good engines ...

... but for a newbie NOPES !!! ...., too much trouble, too much care, more
cleaning periods, etc ... just go for a 2 stroke engine and hey ! ... a good
.46 size its great cause you can use that same engine on some future project
once you master your trainer ...

good luck and welcome to our hobby !!

from chile - southamerica ...

--
Atentamente ...

 Pato Concha Jr.
 Casilla 3381
 Concepcin
 CHILE (SouthAmerica)

 
 
 

2-stroke or 4-stroke

Post by Learjet3 » Fri, 15 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
>I'm building my first airplane, Great Planes Trainer 40.  I am looking
>for suggestions on an engine.  Considering the Tower Hobbies .46 but
>would like input on using a 4-stroke.  What 4-stroke size would be
>equivalent to a .46?  Would you recommend a 4-stroke for someone new to
>the hobby?

An OS 70 Surpass (4 stroke) would be the perfect engine in place of the 46 two
stroke....  

The OS 70 Surpass is a great running 4 stroke engine....

Basically the approximate rule of thumb is:

two stroke           four stroke
    .40           =        .52
    .46           =        .70
    .61           =        .90
    .75           =       1.20
    .91           =       1.50
   1.08          =       1.80


<remove NO-SPAM from email address to respond>

 
 
 

2-stroke or 4-stroke

Post by Jerome Sigu » Fri, 15 Oct 1999 04:00:00



Quote:

> ... 4 strokes sounds better and nicer, are strong and good engines ...

> ... but for a newbie NOPES !!! ...., too much trouble, too much care, more
> cleaning periods, etc ..

Not so!
If a newbie has a good instructor, the instructor can all teach him
to tune and use the fourstroke.  They are not more trouble nor do they
require more care than a ball bearing equiped two stroke.  This is
a myth perpertrated by the forces of the dark side! <G>
Jerry
 
 
 

2-stroke or 4-stroke

Post by EKAJ » Fri, 15 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
>This is
>a myth perpertrated by the forces of the dark side! <G>

I'm with Patricio.  Get a plain bearing two-stroke to start with, and then
trade it off later if it survives.  Break that first engine and you're out $50
or so, break any .70 size 4-stroke and you're out a bunch.  Gravity always
wins!
 
 
 

2-stroke or 4-stroke

Post by Jack » Fri, 15 Oct 1999 04:00:00


For a newbie an OS 2 stroke will usually run fine right out of the box and
once the throttle is set the way you want it, it will run and run and run
with NO hassle.   Also most beginner airplanes are planned with a 2 stroke
in mind and will balance the way the plans tell you to build it.  The 4
stroke takes more cowl space and will usually cause the airplane to be nose
heavy.

I have asked many of the fly boys at our field why they prefer the 4 stroke
and they always answer that they sound better....Big Deal.

Jack AMA 155661

 
 
 

2-stroke or 4-stroke

Post by go.. » Fri, 15 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

>I'm building my first airplane, Great Planes Trainer 40.  I am looking
>for suggestions on an engine.  Considering the Tower Hobbies .46 but
>would like input on using a 4-stroke.  What 4-stroke size would be
>equivalent to a .46?  Would you recommend a 4-stroke for someone new to
>the hobby?

I would go with an OS 46FX 2 strk for your 1st motor.  A lot less expensive and has
plenty of power for this plane and your next one.  If you bend it, you won't cry as
much.

Gord Schindler
MAAC 6694
Toronto, Ont.
Canada

 
 
 

2-stroke or 4-stroke

Post by Paul Mcintos » Fri, 15 Oct 1999 04:00:00


I would not suggest the Tower .46.  I had one and have seen several others
that just would not adjust right.  That is NOT something a newbie needs!

For the trainer, any of the .52-.70 four strokes would be fine.  Since you
will be learning about engines from scratch, it doesn't make a lot of
difference which type you use.  I would leave the YS .53 out of the mix
just because of its added complexity in the pump.  I will go along with the
OS .70 as probably the best all around newbie 4-stroke.  It is just as easy
to adjust as any 2-stroke and is as reliable as a brick. (for the
arguementative out there, that meas it is VERY reliable)

If you want to stick with a 2-stroke, I suggest the Thunder Tiger .46 Pro
from National Hobbies.

Quote:

> I'm building my first airplane, Great Planes Trainer 40.  I am looking
> for suggestions on an engine.  Considering the Tower Hobbies .46 but
> would like input on using a 4-stroke.  What 4-stroke size would be
> equivalent to a .46?  Would you recommend a 4-stroke for someone new to
> the hobby?

> Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> Before you buy.

 
 
 

2-stroke or 4-stroke

Post by Craig Greenin » Fri, 15 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Pato didn't say anything about cost, just that they are more difficult to
run, which is a crock. There is no good reason from the point of operation
not to get a four stroke. They do cost more, both to purchase and in fuel
though. As far as the sound, some people prefer it, myself included, and to
those clubs in noise sensitive areas it IS a big deal.

Craig.


Quote:
> >This is
> >a myth perpertrated by the forces of the dark side! <G>

> I'm with Patricio.  Get a plain bearing two-stroke to start with, and then
> trade it off later if it survives.  Break that first engine and you're out
$50
> or so, break any .70 size 4-stroke and you're out a bunch.  Gravity always
> wins!

 
 
 

2-stroke or 4-stroke

Post by Mike Wizynajty » Fri, 15 Oct 1999 04:00:00


I highly recommend getting the cheap solution. You may well have good
success with whatever you buy, but your taste may change after you've been
in the hobby a little while or you may well bust the thing up during
training.

I'd get a Thunder Tiger Pro .46 for that plane. You can't beat the price or
the user friendliness with any other engine available 2-cycle or 4-cycle.

Wiz

Quote:

> I'm building my first airplane, Great Planes Trainer 40.  I am looking
> for suggestions on an engine.  Considering the Tower Hobbies .46 but
> would like input on using a 4-stroke.  What 4-stroke size would be
> equivalent to a .46?  Would you recommend a 4-stroke for someone new to
> the hobby?

> Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> Before you buy.

 
 
 

2-stroke or 4-stroke

Post by IFly » Fri, 15 Oct 1999 04:00:00


I agree with Mike.  I think the TT Pro 46 is one the best bangs for the buck
available.

Quote:
> I highly recommend getting the cheap solution. You may well have good
> success with whatever you buy, but your taste may change after you've been
> in the hobby a little while or you may well bust the thing up during
> training.

> I'd get a Thunder Tiger Pro .46 for that plane. You can't beat the price
or
> the user friendliness with any other engine available 2-cycle or 4-cycle.

> Wiz


> > I'm building my first airplane, Great Planes Trainer 40.  I am looking
> > for suggestions on an engine.  Considering the Tower Hobbies .46 but
> > would like input on using a 4-stroke.  What 4-stroke size would be
> > equivalent to a .46?  Would you recommend a 4-stroke for someone new to
> > the hobby?

> > Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> > Before you buy.

 
 
 

2-stroke or 4-stroke

Post by Cregge » Fri, 15 Oct 1999 04:00:00


My little OS FS.20 is happy burning 5% nitro fuel and burns very little of
it. How is that more expensive?

It sounds as though someone has brainwashed you into thinking four-strokes
won't run with less than 20% nitro. Not true.

Ed Cregger


Quote:
> Pato didn't say anything about cost, just that they are more difficult to
> run, which is a crock. There is no good reason from the point of operation
> not to get a four stroke. They do cost more, both to purchase and in fuel
> though. As far as the sound, some people prefer it, myself included, and
to
> those clubs in noise sensitive areas it IS a big deal.

> Craig.



> > >This is
> > >a myth perpertrated by the forces of the dark side! <G>

> > I'm with Patricio.  Get a plain bearing two-stroke to start with, and
then
> > trade it off later if it survives.  Break that first engine and you're
out
> $50
> > or so, break any .70 size 4-stroke and you're out a bunch.  Gravity
always
> > wins!

 
 
 

2-stroke or 4-stroke

Post by Cregge » Fri, 15 Oct 1999 04:00:00


I have to agree with the Wiz. The Thunder Tiger .46 Pro is a proven engine
and is barely more money than a loser plain bearing engine. They can be had
new from National Hobby Supply for $65. It will power your trainer very well
and is strong enough for virtually any model made for a .40 to .50 engine.

Ed Cregger


Quote:
> I highly recommend getting the cheap solution. You may well have good
> success with whatever you buy, but your taste may change after you've been
> in the hobby a little while or you may well bust the thing up during
> training.

> I'd get a Thunder Tiger Pro .46 for that plane. You can't beat the price
or
> the user friendliness with any other engine available 2-cycle or 4-cycle.

> Wiz


> > I'm building my first airplane, Great Planes Trainer 40.  I am looking
> > for suggestions on an engine.  Considering the Tower Hobbies .46 but
> > would like input on using a 4-stroke.  What 4-stroke size would be
> > equivalent to a .46?  Would you recommend a 4-stroke for someone new to
> > the hobby?

> > Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> > Before you buy.

 
 
 

2-stroke or 4-stroke

Post by Wayne Patto » Fri, 15 Oct 1999 04:00:00


I bought a OS .61 FX, then bought a Saito .91 4 stroke.  The Saito is not
any more harder to operate than the OS. I uses about the same amount of
fuel.  I like the Saito better.  It is the most reliable engine that we have
on the field.  I has NEVER quit unless out of fuel or or prop striking the
ground.  I liked it well enough to go buy a Saito 1.50.

The only thing that I see that might cause a beginner trouble is that the
Saito have the lifter rods in the front of the engine and may be more
fragile than some 2 strokes. . . . but not harder to run or adjust as long
as you have a tach

my 2 cents . . .

wayne


Quote:
> I highly recommend getting the cheap solution. You may well have good
> success with whatever you buy, but your taste may change after you've been
> in the hobby a little while or you may well bust the thing up during
> training.

> I'd get a Thunder Tiger Pro .46 for that plane. You can't beat the price
or
> the user friendliness with any other engine available 2-cycle or 4-cycle.

> Wiz


> > I'm building my first airplane, Great Planes Trainer 40.  I am looking
> > for suggestions on an engine.  Considering the Tower Hobbies .46 but
> > would like input on using a 4-stroke.  What 4-stroke size would be
> > equivalent to a .46?  Would you recommend a 4-stroke for someone new to
> > the hobby?

> > Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> > Before you buy.

 
 
 

2-stroke or 4-stroke

Post by walte » Fri, 15 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Unless you have a tach and know how to use it, it's easy to set a
fourstroke too lean and possibly damage it.  

The Thunder tiger .46 is going to be cheaper and lighter than an
equivalent power fourstroke and it will be easier to tune by ear.

Quote:

> I'm building my first airplane, Great Planes Trainer 40.  I am looking
> for suggestions on an engine.  Considering the Tower Hobbies .46 but
> would like input on using a 4-stroke.  What 4-stroke size would be
> equivalent to a .46?  Would you recommend a 4-stroke for someone new to
> the hobby?

> Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> Before you buy.

--
Walter

"Happy modelers put RunSwells in their noses"