which bandsaw blade??

which bandsaw blade??

Post by Klaas Focke » Fri, 22 Sep 2000 04:00:00



Hi.  I live up in that terrible wet northwest, where you get all kinds of
wood and you can't keep refusing it, but I'm going through bandsaw blades
cutting this green wood.  Could someone please tell me what the best kind of
blade is to use for this.  I cut crotch, knots and heavily figured wood
(poor me!).

I'm using a 14" Delta with riser block and a Timberwolf 1/4" bandsaw blade.
Any suggestions as to a better blade?

Thanks in advance.
Klaas

 
 
 

which bandsaw blade??

Post by Grusser » Fri, 22 Sep 2000 04:00:00


Timberwolf 1/2" blade with 2 or 3 TPI will do the job for you. The 1/4" blade
has too many teeth to remove the sawdust. .

If Jon Shilling will respond, he has a source in Portland, OR that has 1.5 TPI
blade material.

Russ Fairfield
Silverdale, WA

 
 
 

which bandsaw blade??

Post by James Barle » Fri, 22 Sep 2000 04:00:00


The timberwolf blades are considered to be one of the best available.
I believe the delta comes with steel blade guides, a change to
Coolblocks if you have'nt already done it should extend the life
somewhat, by avoiding overheating the blade.

Jim..

Quote:

> Hi.  I live up in that terrible wet northwest, where you get all kinds of
> wood and you can't keep refusing it, but I'm going through bandsaw blades
> cutting this green wood.  Could someone please tell me what the best kind of
> blade is to use for this.  I cut crotch, knots and heavily figured wood
> (poor me!).

> I'm using a 14" Delta with riser block and a Timberwolf 1/4" bandsaw blade.
> Any suggestions as to a better blade?

> Thanks in advance.
> Klaas

 
 
 

which bandsaw blade??

Post by Jon Schillin » Fri, 22 Sep 2000 04:00:00


Here I am, Russ, Sir!
I am buying my blades from Portland Saw.   503 236 8191
I can't brag about their quality as compared to another brand, because all I
have ever used is the
MADE to order blades from Portland Saw.
I also can not talk to their pricing because it may be different if you were
to require shipping a real long
distance away, but for my buddy Carl Asch and myself, if we purchase 3 or
more at a time and
pay by credit card, the UPS shipping charges are free.   The box of blades
comes the next day if ordered before noon.
Again, I can not tell you what they may do for long distance shipments,.
For 4 years I bought 1" 4tpi for a monster old meat saw.
Because the depth of cut was under 11", I
recently purchased a Grizz 20" bandsaw and I really think highly of it.
The blade that comes with the saw is not intended for serious use, so I
pitched it and bought some .5" 4tpi blades and I am still on the first one
and that is many blanks and months ago.
............
(earlier on in a post somebody mentioned that they didn't think much of the
blade that comes with the saw.   According to the factory tech, via phone,
that blade is not expected to be used for long.   Frankly, I'd be impressed
if they sent their very best blade and
charged me double)
..............
Honestly, someday  I intend to try the timberwolf blades, but I get so
dazzled with their
instructions regarding tension and tuning that I start to giggle and forget
to buy the blades.   <grin>
They must be superior, but I do not know.............
FWIW,

--
Jon Schilling, Ridgefield, Wa.

Quote:
> Timberwolf 1/2" blade with 2 or 3 TPI will do the job for you. The 1/4"
blade
> has too many teeth to remove the sawdust. .

> If Jon Shilling will respond, he has a source in Portland, OR that has 1.5
TPI
> blade material.

> Russ Fairfield
> Silverdale, WA

 
 
 

which bandsaw blade??

Post by e » Fri, 22 Sep 2000 04:00:00


ditto on the timberwolf --- just remember that if you cut something that is
round on the bs table, clamp it so it won't kick out and kink your blade
(took me 2 blades to realize this)
e

Quote:
> Timberwolf 1/2" blade with 2 or 3 TPI will do the job for you. The 1/4"
blade
> has too many teeth to remove the sawdust. .

> If Jon Shilling will respond, he has a source in Portland, OR that has 1.5
TPI
> blade material.

> Russ Fairfield
> Silverdale, WA

 
 
 

which bandsaw blade??

Post by Fred Holde » Fri, 22 Sep 2000 04:00:00


Hello Klaas,

Sounds like you're working your saw too hard. Actually, 3/8" or 1/2" blades
would likely last longer. They don't give you the cutting radius control of the
1/4" blade, but my experience says that they stand up longer. However, I think
that the wet wood tends to rust and wipe out the edge of the cutting part.
Another thing that made my bandsaw perform better was the addition of a set of
BandRollers from Woodcraft. They sell for $69.99, but are an excellent
investment. When I bought my set (on the way to the Tacoma AAW Symposium in
1999), I had a fairly dull blade on the saw that would hardly cut. The band
rollers held the blade more steady and made it cut better. They give the blade
support that you can't get with either the steel blocks that generally come with
your saw, or cool blocks, or even brass rod as I used for some time. I do not
know how long these band rollers will last. I don't use my bandsaw excessively
heavy, but I do use it almost everyday. They are still working after a year of
service.

Fred Holder
<http://www.fholder.com/>


Quote:

>Hi.  I live up in that terrible wet northwest, where you get all kinds of
>wood and you can't keep refusing it, but I'm going through bandsaw blades
>cutting this green wood.  Could someone please tell me what the best kind of
>blade is to use for this.  I cut crotch, knots and heavily figured wood
>(poor me!).

>I'm using a 14" Delta with riser block and a Timberwolf 1/4" bandsaw blade.
>Any suggestions as to a better blade?

>Thanks in advance.
>Klaas

Fred Holder
<http://www.fholder.com/>
 
 
 

which bandsaw blade??

Post by speedbuggy » Fri, 22 Sep 2000 04:00:00


Why not a 3/4" 3 tpi blade from timberwolf, I also hear that Lenox make an
excellent carbide tipped 1/2" and 3/4" blade that is said to outlast
standard blades by far. I have heard that the Lenox blade will break (at the
weld) way before the carbide tips are dull (but it still lasts longer than a
standard blade)


Quote:
> Hi.  I live up in that terrible wet northwest, where you get all kinds of
> wood and you can't keep refusing it, but I'm going through bandsaw blades
> cutting this green wood.  Could someone please tell me what the best kind
of
> blade is to use for this.  I cut crotch, knots and heavily figured wood
> (poor me!).

> I'm using a 14" Delta with riser block and a Timberwolf 1/4" bandsaw
blade.
> Any suggestions as to a better blade?

> Thanks in advance.
> Klaas

 
 
 

which bandsaw blade??

Post by Howard Kleppe » Sat, 23 Sep 2000 11:52:33


Timberwolf (Suffolk Machinery) makes a 3 TPI 3/8" blade with a slightly
wider than normal set, which they recommend for green wood.  The coarser
tpi gives you more gullet for clearing the swarf, and the wider set
makes less stuff adhere to the blade.  If you tell them you are sawing
green logs, they will know what to recommend.

Of course, this blade is not magical.  Lubricate often (Pam is cheap and
good--spray some on a rag and hold it to the blade while rotating
backwards by hand)--as often as once for each cut.  Debarking will
extend your blade life big time (as*** Cheney says).  Dirt and silica
are more concentrated in the bark.  Feed as fast as you can without
filling the gullets; this will make your blade run cooler.  It's the
heat that causes the crud to bake on to the blade from green wood.
That's why you get more on the inside of the blade; the compression on
that side from the wheels heats the blade more than the expansion on the
outside.   I scrape off the crud with a "chip'' (love that euphemism)
chisel held to the side of the blade just behind the gullets, rotating
forward by hand.

I thought I'd give a couple of Grizzley blades a try, since I was
ordering some stuff from them recently.  I don't recommend them.

 
 
 

which bandsaw blade??

Post by bill » Sat, 23 Sep 2000 04:00:00


I tried a 1.5 TPI from Timberwolf (Suffolk) and didn't like it.  It
was really grabby and tended to grab the wood and try to slam it down.

So for my Jet with risers the 3 TPI 1.5 incher seems to be my all
around favorite with the 3/8 second. Now that Lee Valley carries
Timberwolf I simply add them to orders whereas I used to buy from
Suffolk Machinery (who have been very good to deal with as well).

Bill78

(Who would have a Laguna 18SE if the table wasn't so small.)

Quote:

>Timberwolf 1/2" blade with 2 or 3 TPI will do the job for you. The 1/4" blade
>has too many teeth to remove the sawdust. .

>If Jon Shilling will respond, he has a source in Portland, OR that has 1.5 TPI
>blade material.

>Russ Fairfield
>Silverdale, WA

 
 
 

which bandsaw blade??

Post by bill » Sat, 23 Sep 2000 04:00:00


Naturally I meant my all around favorite is the 1/2 inch blade, not
1.5 incher.

Bill78

Quote:

>I tried a 1.5 TPI from Timberwolf (Suffolk) and didn't like it.  It
>was really grabby and tended to grab the wood and try to slam it down.

>So for my Jet with risers the 3 TPI 1.5 incher seems to be my all
>around favorite with the 3/8 second. Now that Lee Valley carries
>Timberwolf I simply add them to orders whereas I used to buy from
>Suffolk Machinery (who have been very good to deal with as well).

>Bill78

>(Who would have a Laguna 18SE if the table wasn't so small.)


>>Timberwolf 1/2" blade with 2 or 3 TPI will do the job for you. The 1/4" blade
>>has too many teeth to remove the sawdust. .

>>If Jon Shilling will respond, he has a source in Portland, OR that has 1.5 TPI
>>blade material.

>>Russ Fairfield
>>Silverdale, WA

 
 
 

which bandsaw blade??

Post by Mary Shafe » Sat, 23 Sep 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

> Of course, this blade is not magical.  Lubricate often (Pam is cheap and
> good--spray some on a rag and hold it to the blade while rotating
> backwards by hand)--as often as once for each cut.

While Pam is cheap, you're paying a lot for the spray can and
marketing.  If you have a health-food store in the area, you can buy
lecithin in liquid form.  Pam is lecithin (I'm assuming you don't mean
the olive-oil or garlic flavored versions, of course).

If you don't have a health-food store or yours doesn't carry it, you
can try a pharmacy (not a chain drug store).  Ask the pharmacist to
order you some.  It may be a slightly higher grade than you'd get
elsewhere, but it will still be cheaper, ounce for ounce, than Pam.
And you won't have to worry about overspray.

--
Mary Shafer

Senior Handling Qualities Research Engineer
NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA

 
 
 

which bandsaw blade??

Post by Jon Schillin » Sat, 23 Sep 2000 04:00:00


Hi Mary,
Did I miss it?
How would you apply the licithin?
I know we all appreciate the tip.

--
Jon Schilling, Ridgefield, Wa.

Quote:

> > Of course, this blade is not magical.  Lubricate often (Pam is cheap and
> > good--spray some on a rag and hold it to the blade while rotating
> > backwards by hand)--as often as once for each cut.

> While Pam is cheap, you're paying a lot for the spray can and
> marketing.  If you have a health-food store in the area, you can buy
> lecithin in liquid form.  Pam is lecithin (I'm assuming you don't mean
> the olive-oil or garlic flavored versions, of course).

> If you don't have a health-food store or yours doesn't carry it, you
> can try a pharmacy (not a chain drug store).  Ask the pharmacist to
> order you some.  It may be a slightly higher grade than you'd get
> elsewhere, but it will still be cheaper, ounce for ounce, than Pam.
> And you won't have to worry about overspray.

> --
> Mary Shafer

> Senior Handling Qualities Research Engineer
> NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA


 
 
 

which bandsaw blade??

Post by Howard Kleppe » Sun, 24 Sep 2000 11:09:51


according to the can, the main ingredient in Pam is canola oil.
Lecithin does add stick-preventive properties; it will keep food (or wet
sawdust) separated from hot metal.  But lecithin alone will not
lubricate the cut at the teeth of the blade, the oil does that.

I like the convenience of the spray can.  I spray on to a small rag held
right in front of the nozzle, not on to the blade.  No overspray
problem.

 
 
 

which bandsaw blade??

Post by Grusser » Sun, 24 Sep 2000 04:00:00


Kerosene works just as well as "Pam" as a bandsaw blade lubricant, and 1K
kerosene sells for about 6 bucks a gallon. If you don't want a full gallon, you
can buy a smaller bottle for the same price in the grocery store where it is
sold as "fire starter".

It is also a good coating to prevent rust on machine surfaces, and doesn't
interfere with any finish that I know of, other than water-borne which I don't
use.

Russ Fairfield
Silverdale, WA

 
 
 

which bandsaw blade??

Post by Howard Kleppe » Sun, 24 Sep 2000 04:00:00


as per my post above, Pam has a stick-preventive component that helps
with green wood.  I've never tried to do a controlled comparison, but I
would guess that kerosene is a little less effective at preventing crud
sticking.  In practice, probably no big difference.

For those who like their kerosene at a high price with the convenience
of a spray can (I'm one of those), there's WD-40.  Damned if I can tell
any difference between it and kerosene.