Help - Newbie

Help - Newbie

Post by Ian McKenzi » Sun, 24 Dec 2000 06:43:42



After saying for years that I will get a lathe when I retire, my partner
decided I might not live that long and gave me a lathe for my
irthday( 43rd).... but I've never used one before.

I'm on the way to the bookshop later today... and have found a few bits on
the web.... but even they assume you know something about woodturning (ie
what height should the toolrest be - centre or above or below etc).  I'll
start reading later today.... but if anyone knows of a site for a full blown
BEGINNER please let me know... or even if you have some really basic (and I
mean basic) hints or tips... or any info will do.

Ian
Australia

 
 
 

Help - Newbie

Post by ì » Sun, 24 Dec 2000 18:01:07


Hi Ian.

I found Richard Raffans book "Turning Wood" (I think that's the proper
name - mine is in the workshop) very good. It gives all the sort of info
you're after. You could check out Southern Woodturnings page at
www.woodturning.com.au a look. Failing that, visit your local woodturning
shop or club. I don't know where you are in Oz, but Southern Woodturning is
here in Canberra and Graeme is very helpful. Also, check out the following
link which takes you to an Aussie bulletin board which a lot of local guys
contribute to. http://ubb.ubeaut.com.au/cgi-bin/Ultimate.cgi?action=intro

Steve
Canberra
Australia


Quote:
> After saying for years that I will get a lathe when I retire, my partner
> decided I might not live that long and gave me a lathe for my
> irthday( 43rd).... but I've never used one before.

> I'm on the way to the bookshop later today... and have found a few bits on
> the web.... but even they assume you know something about woodturning (ie
> what height should the toolrest be - centre or above or below etc).  I'll
> start reading later today.... but if anyone knows of a site for a full
blown
> BEGINNER please let me know... or even if you have some really basic (and
I
> mean basic) hints or tips... or any info will do.

> Ian
> Australia


 
 
 

Help - Newbie

Post by mhorda » Sun, 24 Dec 2000 08:34:15




Quote:
> After saying for years that I will get a lathe when I retire, my
partner
> decided I might not live that long and gave me a lathe for my
> irthday( 43rd).... but I've never used one before.

> I'm on the way to the bookshop later today... and have found a few
bits on
> the web.... but even they assume you know something about woodturning
(ie
> what height should the toolrest be - centre or above or below etc).
I'll
> start reading later today.... but if anyone knows of a site for a
full blown
> BEGINNER please let me know... or even if you have some really basic
(and I
> mean basic) hints or tips... or any info will do.

> Ian
> Australia

Hello Ian,

The following URL will take you to a site where Brian Clifford is
writing an online book for woodturners. It's not complete yet but then
nor are your skills so you should find something interesting/helpful.

If you want really basic hints or tips .....
1 make sure your wood is well secured on the lathe before starting it.

2 spin the wood by hand to make sure it won't hit anything, e.g
toolrest, if it isn't properly round once the lathe is started.

3 begin at a low speed, you'll figure this one out quickly enough!

4 start with "firewood pieces". This means either using bits of wood
that were in the firewood pile or being of a mind that anything you
make is going to end up as firewood.

5 This is number one really but I didn't want to appear to be preaching.
Wear safety gear for all the bits that you value. If you're not sure
what to value start with eyes, lungs and progress to hands, knees and
bumps-a-daisy if you find that the lathe and the wood part company a
lot. (Caveat, never wear gloves when turning...some do and will advise
otherwise, but these are my tips).

6 Don't force the issue with your tools, give them chance to cut and
keep them sharp.

7 Heights. The general rule of thumb is the spindle height should be
about elbow height. The tool rest will be above, below and on centre at
various times but it doesn't really matter to the extent that it should
be something to pre-occupy yourself with. Eventually you'll find
yourself putting it at the height you want without really thinking
about where it is exactly, relative to centre height.

8 Back to the lateral; the toolrest needs to be placed closeish to the
work. This is so that the downward force of the wood on the tool tip is
not so great that you find it difficult to maintain control of the
tool. As you remove material the gap between toolrest and wood
increases so you need to move the toolrest in again to regain that
control.

9 You've read number 6 and you're already thinking how do I sharpen
these tools. Tip number 9 is don't fret about sharpening. At first
you're skills will be lousy and your tools not very sharp, but your
pieces will still burn. Later your skills will improve and you'll
acquire more knowledge of how to sharpen, the two should improve in
tandem and your pieces will start to adorn the fireplace.

10 Don't always be looking over your shoulder at how wonderful everbody
else's turnings are and thinking you'll never do anything worthwhile.
If you're turning rubbish and having the time of your life it's working
for you. If you want to improve on the rubbish don't be content with
the level you're at and things will get better. If you're happy with
the rubbish, like I said it's working for you, just develop a thick
skin!

There you are my ten top tips. Then of course there's sanding,
finishing, selling your work.........

--
Regards,
Brian.
http://www.molehillturnery.co.uk

Sent via Deja.com
http://www.deja.com/

 
 
 

Help - Newbie

Post by Peter Charles Fag » Sun, 24 Dec 2000 08:41:43


Hello and welcome.  Every time someone asks for help as a beginner I post this URL, it can prove to be very useful.  Despite the years rolling away there is always time for turning.  Please return and let us know how you get on, all the best for the holidays,
http://www.woodworking.co.uk/Technical/Beginners/beginners.html

Regards,
Peter Charles Fagg,
Isle of Wight, United Kingdom.
Homepage  www.petersplatters.co.uk

 
 
 

Help - Newbie

Post by mhorda » Sun, 24 Dec 2000 08:43:16


Quote:
> Hello Ian,

> The following URL will take you to a site where Brian Clifford is
> writing an online book for woodturners. It's not complete yet but then
> nor are your skills so you should find something interesting/helpful.

Tip number 11. Include the URL!!!
http://www.a1studio.freeserve.co.uk/wtintro/wtintro.html

--
Regards,
Brian.
http://www.molehillturnery.co.uk

Sent via Deja.com
http://www.deja.com/

 
 
 

Help - Newbie

Post by Steve Marshal » Sun, 24 Dec 2000 21:03:45


Ian, I strongly suggest you find somewhere nearby that does introductory
turning courses, and do one.  I have been working with wood (but not
turning) for years, but I started by doing an intro course, and I'm very
glad I did.  It was only 4 Saturday mornings, but it was enough to give me
a reasonable grounding in the basics.  There is no substitute for actually
being shown the right ways to do things, hands-on - to actually feel what
it is like to do it right, and wrong.  The techniques involved in turning
are not necessarily obvious or intuitive, and the forces generated by the
piece of wood whirling on the lathe are enormous, so the safety side of
things is very important.  I have had a lathe for only a bit over a year
now, and still consider myself pretty much a novice - I have had numerous
tool catches, causing workpieces to go flying across the workshop!
Fortunately I haven't been in the way of any of them, and still have my
full complement of fingers etc!

Good luck - it's an absorbing pastime.  And, alas, can be quite an
expensive one - you will find that the lathe is just the beginning!

Best regards
Steve Marshall (also in Australia (WA))



Quote:
> After saying for years that I will get a lathe when I retire, my partner
> decided I might not live that long and gave me a lathe for my
> irthday( 43rd).... but I've never used one before.

> I'm on the way to the bookshop later today... and have found a few bits
on
> the web.... but even they assume you know something about woodturning (ie
> what height should the toolrest be - centre or above or below etc).  I'll
> start reading later today.... but if anyone knows of a site for a full
blown
> BEGINNER please let me know... or even if you have some really basic (and
I
> mean basic) hints or tips... or any info will do.

> Ian
> Australia

 
 
 

Help - Newbie

Post by scott swag » Mon, 25 Dec 2000 05:01:05


Welcome to the friendly world of wood turning.
Here is a site that can help you get started.
http://www.a1studio.freeserve.co.uk/wtintro/wtintro.html
This News/Group will answer most of your questions along with e-mailing
myself and others. I`ll will be happy to give you any tips, as needed.
Enjoy!  Merry Christmas

LIONSEYES
BIG SUR

 
 
 

Help - Newbie

Post by Bill Sulliv » Mon, 25 Dec 2000 23:42:00


Dear Newbie,
This webpage was designed for beginning
woodturners.  It is most helpful.
Bill
in SW Florida
http://www.woodworking.co.uk/Technical/Beginners/beginners.html