Fluorescent Light, Need help

Fluorescent Light, Need help

Post by Georg » Sun, 12 Dec 2004 06:36:58



Working indoors with heat?  Either will do.  You'll take things to the
window to judge color, anyway.

If you're in poorly or unheated, you'll want cold start fixtures and bulbs.


Quote:
> I just bought on sale a 48" shoplight.
> I did not exactly what type of fluorescent light tubes to get.  I got back
> home with Super Saver Cold White.  Then I learned that I could have
> purchased " Daylight or soft white.
> I wonder what is the most popular with type used for woodturning.

> Denis

 
 
 

Fluorescent Light, Need help

Post by shap » Sun, 12 Dec 2004 08:20:16


Flourescent lighting creates a stroboscopic effect with rotating
machinery which could appear to be standing still ,take care and happy
shavings

Aubrey

 
 
 

Fluorescent Light, Need help

Post by bill » Sun, 12 Dec 2004 09:06:46



Quote:
>I just bought on sale a 48" shoplight.
> I did not exactly what type of fluorescent light tubes to get.  I got back
> home with Super Saver Cold White.  Then I learned that I could have
> purchased " Daylight or soft white.
> I wonder what is the most popular with type used for woodturning.

> Denis

You'll find the tubes you have will give a slight blue color but not really
a big deal. In some of my shop light fixtures I have a cold white tube
paired with a Warm White which makes it more like daylight. My wife also
uses this combination in her plant stand with good results and is a lot
cheaper than the Grow lights. I haven't had any problems with strobe effects
but some people are more sensitive than others to this effect.
Billh
 
 
 

Fluorescent Light, Need help

Post by Phisherma » Sun, 12 Dec 2004 09:56:53


On Fri, 10 Dec 2004 21:22:14 GMT, "Denis Marier"

Quote:

>I just bought on sale a 48" shoplight.
>I did not exactly what type of fluorescent light tubes to get.  I got back
>home with Super Saver Cold White.  Then I learned that I could have
>purchased " Daylight or soft white.
>I wonder what is the most popular with type used for woodturning.

>Denis

Incandescent is best for task lighting.  I use a cheap drafting lamp
and built my own wooden base screwed into the wall.  I can position
the lamp exactly where I need it.  I did the same setup for my router
table, drill press, and chop saw.   A fluorescent lamp is tiring to
the eyes and could produce annoying strobe patterns, although I use
fluorescent for general shop lighting.
 
 
 

Fluorescent Light, Need help

Post by Dan Koza » Sun, 12 Dec 2004 12:15:33



Quote:

> Flourescent lighting creates a stroboscopic effect with rotating
> machinery which could appear to be standing still ,take care and happy
> shavings

> Aubrey

The new fluorescent  fixtures with electronic ballasts don't seem to
have as much stroboscopic effect as the magnetic ballast fixtures do.

--
Dan Kozar


remove NOSPAM

 
 
 

Fluorescent Light, Need help

Post by Maxpro » Sun, 12 Dec 2004 14:49:10


Quote:

> Incandescent is best for task lighting.  I use a cheap drafting lamp
> and built my own wooden base screwed into the wall.  I can position
> the lamp exactly where I need it.  I did the same setup for my router
> table, drill press, and chop saw.   A fluorescent lamp is tiring to
> the eyes and could produce annoying strobe patterns, although I use
> fluorescent for general shop lighting.

Second that.  I bought two, relatively inexpensive machinist's lamps
(magnetic base, flexible arm, metal reflector shade) and put one on the
headstock and one on the ways when turning a bowl.  They produce plenty of
light and are positionable.

Max

 
 
 

Fluorescent Light, Need help

Post by william_b_nobl » Sun, 12 Dec 2004 15:05:01


incadescents are horribly less efficicient than flourescents - for 160 watts
(two 8 ft tubes) you get a lot more light than a box full of 60 watt
incadescents and a lot less heat too - you probably want both, the
incadescent for spot lighting and directional lighting of your work when you
need it, and the fluorescents for general shop lighting.  I know I use
both...


Quote:


> > Incandescent is best for task lighting.  I use a cheap drafting lamp
> > and built my own wooden base screwed into the wall.  I can position
> > the lamp exactly where I need it.  I did the same setup for my router
> > table, drill press, and chop saw.   A fluorescent lamp is tiring to
> > the eyes and could produce annoying strobe patterns, although I use
> > fluorescent for general shop lighting.

> Second that.  I bought two, relatively inexpensive machinist's lamps
> (magnetic base, flexible arm, metal reflector shade) and put one on the
> headstock and one on the ways when turning a bowl.  They produce plenty of
> light and are positionable.

> Max

 
 
 

Fluorescent Light, Need help

Post by Leo Van Der Lo » Sun, 12 Dec 2004 14:59:33


Hi Dennis

Dennis daylight and warm white give a redder light and I have used them
with plants and also combined with cool white, but for the use by my
lathe I like the cool whites best, I also use a incandescence quarts
light bulb to give me less cycle flicker, which you can have sometimes
when the 60 hertz coincides with the rotation speed of the wood, and
that can drive you crazy.

Have fun and take care
Leo Van Der Loo

Quote:

> I just bought on sale a 48" shoplight.
> I did not exactly what type of fluorescent light tubes to get.  I got back
> home with Super Saver Cold White.  Then I learned that I could have
> purchased " Daylight or soft white.
> I wonder what is the most popular with type used for woodturning.

> Denis

 
 
 

Fluorescent Light, Need help

Post by Georg » Sun, 12 Dec 2004 22:08:29



Quote:


> > Incandescent is best for task lighting.  I use a cheap drafting lamp
> > and built my own wooden base screwed into the wall.  I can position
> > the lamp exactly where I need it.  I did the same setup for my router
> > table, drill press, and chop saw.   A fluorescent lamp is tiring to
> > the eyes and could produce annoying strobe patterns, although I use
> > fluorescent for general shop lighting.

> Second that.  I bought two, relatively inexpensive machinist's lamps
> (magnetic base, flexible arm, metal reflector shade) and put one on the
> headstock and one on the ways when turning a bowl.  They produce plenty of
> light and are positionable.

I found that mounting the lamps to the stand shortened their bulb life, so
my swing arm floods are now mounted off the stand and burning longer.

I like to blame the stroboscopic effect for the barked knuckles I get
sometimes when cutting interrupted-edge bowls.

 
 
 

Fluorescent Light, Need help

Post by mac davi » Mon, 13 Dec 2004 01:47:01


Quote:

>I found that mounting the lamps to the stand shortened their bulb life, so
>my swing arm floods are now mounted off the stand and burning longer.

>I like to blame the stroboscopic effect for the barked knuckles I get
>sometimes when cutting interrupted-edge bowls.

ok.. admission to tackiness time:
I was turning a pencil holder for my wife last night and felt like I
was drilling a mine shaft in the dark, once I got down a few inches.
(shoulda drilled it first, I guess)

I got my handy-dandy HF fluorescent trouble light out and hung it on
an adjustable height roller stand behind me...

It worked great, was very adjustable and CHEAP.. lol
(note to self: if ever doing serious turning on a shopsmith, put the
sucker up on blocks!)

 
 
 

Fluorescent Light, Need help

Post by Leo Van Der Lo » Mon, 13 Dec 2004 09:00:48


Hi Mac, yes we all do those things, nothing wrong with it if it works
for you, and like George says keep it off the vibrating machine , be it
lathe, grinder, sander, saw or whatever else, the super hot filaments
don't take kindly to the shaking <G> that is going on, I've a couple of
quarts spot lights on either side of my lathe, but I block the light
very often with body or arm or just the depth of the turning will not
let the light get there where I need it, for that I have one of those
pivoting desk lamp with the elbow/wrist kind of hinge points, and made a
couple of bracket/hole dohickys (so that I can place the light in the
best possible positioning), on the shelf and wall next to my lathe, even
then I would like a better way at times, I have been looking for a
inexpensive Light Emitting Diode (LED) that gives enough light and which
I would be able to  attach and remove from my cutting tool easily, have
not made up my mind how or what, but I hope to find a better lighting
solution to the problem of not able to see what I want.

Have fun and take care
Leo Van Der Loo

Quote:


>>I found that mounting the lamps to the stand shortened their bulb life, so
>>my swing arm floods are now mounted off the stand and burning longer.

>>I like to blame the stroboscopic effect for the barked knuckles I get
>>sometimes when cutting interrupted-edge bowls.

> ok.. admission to tackiness time:
> I was turning a pencil holder for my wife last night and felt like I
> was drilling a mine shaft in the dark, once I got down a few inches.
> (shoulda drilled it first, I guess)

> I got my handy-dandy HF fluorescent trouble light out and hung it on
> an adjustable height roller stand behind me...

> It worked great, was very adjustable and CHEAP.. lol
> (note to self: if ever doing serious turning on a shopsmith, put the
> sucker up on blocks!)

 
 
 

Fluorescent Light, Need help

Post by Harry B. Py » Mon, 13 Dec 2004 11:50:09


Quote:
> ...I have been looking for a
> inexpensive Light Emitting Diode (LED) that gives enough light and which
> I would be able to  attach and remove from my cutting tool easily, have
> not made up my mind how or what, but I hope to find a better lighting
> solution to the problem of not able to see what I want.

Leo, if you come up with a working LED system, please share it with the
group. I'd really like to see something like that.

Harry

 
 
 

Fluorescent Light, Need help

Post by Maxpro » Mon, 13 Dec 2004 14:53:27


Quote:

> incadescents are horribly less efficicient than flourescents - for 160
watts
> (two 8 ft tubes) you get a lot more light than a box full of 60 watt
> incadescents and a lot less heat too - you probably want both, the
> incadescent for spot lighting and directional lighting of your work when
you
> need it, and the fluorescents for general shop lighting.  I know I use
> both...

Guess I should have mentioned that I have several fluorescent fixtures
overhead in the shop, one immediately above the lathe.  The incandescents
simply brighten and add definition to the workpiece when turning.

Max

 
 
 

Fluorescent Light, Need help

Post by mac davi » Mon, 13 Dec 2004 16:34:39


On Sat, 11 Dec 2004 19:00:48 -0500, Leo Van Der Loo

Quote:

>Hi Mac, yes we all do those things, nothing wrong with it if it works
>for you, and like George says keep it off the vibrating machine , be it
>lathe, grinder, sander, saw or whatever else, the super hot filaments
>don't take kindly to the shaking <G> that is going on, I've a couple of
>quarts spot lights on either side of my lathe, but I block the light
>very often with body or arm or just the depth of the turning will not
>let the light get there where I need it, for that I have one of those
>pivoting desk lamp with the elbow/wrist kind of hinge points, and made a
>couple of bracket/hole dohickys (so that I can place the light in the
>best possible positioning), on the shelf and wall next to my lathe, even
>then I would like a better way at times, I have been looking for a
>inexpensive Light Emitting Diode (LED) that gives enough light and which
>I would be able to  attach and remove from my cutting tool easily, have
>not made up my mind how or what, but I hope to find a better lighting
>solution to the problem of not able to see what I want.

>Have fun and take care
>Leo Van Der Loo

I was thinking about that same thing, Leo..
last night, I was getting stiff and sore because I had to sit in a
certain position and lean just right, or the shadow of the lathe
chisel got in the way..

Damn pencil holder.. about a 2" hole, 6 inches deep.. WTF do I have a
drill press for? DUH...

Anyway, I was trying to figure out how many LED's I'd need to duct
tape to the chisel handle to do the job, and if the vibration and
clunks would kill the LED's..

I have a LED flashlight that would work, but I'm not going to kill a
$30 flashlight for a damn pencil holder.. lol

I think I'll just modify the shopsmith by morphing it with my floor
jack and point the sucker at the light.. rofl

- Show quoted text -

Quote:



>>>I found that mounting the lamps to the stand shortened their bulb life, so
>>>my swing arm floods are now mounted off the stand and burning longer.

>>>I like to blame the stroboscopic effect for the barked knuckles I get
>>>sometimes when cutting interrupted-edge bowls.

>> ok.. admission to tackiness time:
>> I was turning a pencil holder for my wife last night and felt like I
>> was drilling a mine shaft in the dark, once I got down a few inches.
>> (shoulda drilled it first, I guess)

>> I got my handy-dandy HF fluorescent trouble light out and hung it on
>> an adjustable height roller stand behind me...

>> It worked great, was very adjustable and CHEAP.. lol
>> (note to self: if ever doing serious turning on a shopsmith, put the
>> sucker up on blocks!)

 
 
 

Fluorescent Light, Need help

Post by Georg » Mon, 13 Dec 2004 21:58:39


I have taped one of those flexible mechanics lights to the hollowing tool.
Didn't seem to bother the little bulb that much.  Didn't improve my turning,
either.


Quote:
> Anyway, I was trying to figure out how many LED's I'd need to duct
> tape to the chisel handle to do the job, and if the vibration and
> clunks would kill the LED's..

> I have a LED flashlight that would work, but I'm not going to kill a
> $30 flashlight for a damn pencil holder.. lol