Carbide bandsaw blades

Carbide bandsaw blades

Post by massman » Fri, 19 Jan 2007 23:16:38



I am needing to purchase a new bandsaw blade.  I have had good luck
with the timberwolf  3tpi x 1/2" blades but they dont seem to last very
long.   I mainly use my Grizzly G1019 (w/ riser ) bandsaw for cutting
blanks before mounting on my jet 1236.  I do trim most of the blanks
with a chainsaw before making round on bandsaw.  So there is still some
bark which is probably dulling the blade.  I mainly use green wood that
is about 6" deep or less.

So what are everyone thoughts on carbide blades for rounding blanks.

Here is the one I was looking at purchasing.
http://www.grizzly.com/products/H6998
 At $53 if it would out last two timberwolf blades it would be more
economical.  

Thanks for your thoughts,
Steve Massman

 
 
 

Carbide bandsaw blades

Post by Darrell Feltmat » Fri, 19 Jan 2007 23:24:48


Steve
I get regular bandsaw blades from http://tufftooth.com/ and find both the
blades and the service excellent. They also have silicon steel blades
similar to the Timber Wolf and these are excellent as well. I sharpen my
blades a la Steve Russell and find that i get about three sharpenings per
blade before metal fatigue sets in on my 72" blade.
If you do go the carbide route it would be nice to know how it works out.

--
God bless and safe turning
Darrell Feltmate
Truro, NS Canada
www.aroundthewoods.com


I am needing to purchase a new bandsaw blade.  I have had good luck
with the timberwolf  3tpi x 1/2" blades but they dont seem to last very
long.   I mainly use my Grizzly G1019 (w/ riser ) bandsaw for cutting
blanks before mounting on my jet 1236.  I do trim most of the blanks
with a chainsaw before making round on bandsaw.  So there is still some
bark which is probably dulling the blade.  I mainly use green wood that
is about 6" deep or less.

So what are everyone thoughts on carbide blades for rounding blanks.

Here is the one I was looking at purchasing.
http://www.grizzly.com/products/H6998
 At $53 if it would out last two timberwolf blades it would be more
economical.

Thanks for your thoughts,
Steve Massman

 
 
 

Carbide bandsaw blades

Post by <marie.. » Fri, 19 Jan 2007 23:48:52


I concur with Darrell.  The problem with me is when I am not careful I break
the blade when I get around blanks.
I soon learned that (with my band saw) the base of the blank has to be
square with the blade.  Otherwise the blade binds and breaks.
Replacing a broken carbide blade is more expensive than a metal one.
When selecting a carbide blade I would inquire about the teeth configuration
to cut green wood.  For the average band saw a 4 skip tooth works good.
That is 4 teeth per inch with one racker.  A large band saw work fine with a
3 teeth per inch with one racker.
Let us know how you make out with the carbide blade.


Quote:
> Steve
> I get regular bandsaw blades from http://tufftooth.com/ and find both the
> blades and the service excellent. They also have silicon steel blades
> similar to the Timber Wolf and these are excellent as well. I sharpen my
> blades a la Steve Russell and find that i get about three sharpenings per
> blade before metal fatigue sets in on my 72" blade.
> If you do go the carbide route it would be nice to know how it works out.

> --
> God bless and safe turning
> Darrell Feltmate
> Truro, NS Canada
> www.aroundthewoods.com



> I am needing to purchase a new bandsaw blade.  I have had good luck
> with the timberwolf  3tpi x 1/2" blades but they dont seem to last very
> long.   I mainly use my Grizzly G1019 (w/ riser ) bandsaw for cutting
> blanks before mounting on my jet 1236.  I do trim most of the blanks
> with a chainsaw before making round on bandsaw.  So there is still some
> bark which is probably dulling the blade.  I mainly use green wood that
> is about 6" deep or less.

> So what are everyone thoughts on carbide blades for rounding blanks.

> Here is the one I was looking at purchasing.
> http://www.grizzly.com/products/H6998
> At $53 if it would out last two timberwolf blades it would be more
> economical.

> Thanks for your thoughts,
> Steve Massman

 
 
 

Carbide bandsaw blades

Post by robo hipp » Sat, 20 Jan 2007 01:23:33


I am lucky to have a Lennox blade dealer here in town, and can get
anything that I need from him. For general bowl blank roughing a
bimetal blade works best. They last a lot longer than other blades.
While I haven't used anything else, I have several friends who have
switched to them and this is what they have told me. They are a utility
blade and good for rough work. I do have a carbide tipped blade that
costs about double what a bimetal blade does (150 inch by 1 1/4 blade
$75 to $180). I did use one for bowl blanks for a while just to see how
they did. They work fine, but don't seem to last any longer. They are
made for resawing board stock, and the dealer said that they are a must
have if you are planning to resaw your own veneers. I can get a surface
that needs almost no sanding with them, but are overkill for bowls.
robo hippy
Quote:

> I concur with Darrell.  The problem with me is when I am not careful I break
> the blade when I get around blanks.
> I soon learned that (with my band saw) the base of the blank has to be
> square with the blade.  Otherwise the blade binds and breaks.
> Replacing a broken carbide blade is more expensive than a metal one.
> When selecting a carbide blade I would inquire about the teeth configuration
> to cut green wood.  For the average band saw a 4 skip tooth works good.
> That is 4 teeth per inch with one racker.  A large band saw work fine with a
> 3 teeth per inch with one racker.
> Let us know how you make out with the carbide blade.



> > Steve
> > I get regular bandsaw blades from http://tufftooth.com/ and find both the
> > blades and the service excellent. They also have silicon steel blades
> > similar to the Timber Wolf and these are excellent as well. I sharpen my
> > blades a la Steve Russell and find that i get about three sharpenings per
> > blade before metal fatigue sets in on my 72" blade.
> > If you do go the carbide route it would be nice to know how it works out.

> > --
> > God bless and safe turning
> > Darrell Feltmate
> > Truro, NS Canada
> > www.aroundthewoods.com



> > I am needing to purchase a new bandsaw blade.  I have had good luck
> > with the timberwolf  3tpi x 1/2" blades but they dont seem to last very
> > long.   I mainly use my Grizzly G1019 (w/ riser ) bandsaw for cutting
> > blanks before mounting on my jet 1236.  I do trim most of the blanks
> > with a chainsaw before making round on bandsaw.  So there is still some
> > bark which is probably dulling the blade.  I mainly use green wood that
> > is about 6" deep or less.

> > So what are everyone thoughts on carbide blades for rounding blanks.

> > Here is the one I was looking at purchasing.
> > http://www.grizzly.com/products/H6998
> > At $53 if it would out last two timberwolf blades it would be more
> > economical.

> > Thanks for your thoughts,
> > Steve Massman

 
 
 

Carbide bandsaw blades

Post by Georg » Sat, 20 Jan 2007 02:12:53



Quote:
>I concur with Darrell.  The problem with me is when I am not careful I
>break the blade when I get around blanks.
> I soon learned that (with my band saw) the base of the blank has to be
> square with the blade.  Otherwise the blade binds and breaks.

Note that the blade will be square with any flat base.  It's tip and pinch
that get you.  Suggestions for flattening if you're not the best with a
chainsaw include scrub/jack/block planes, or perhaps you might want to lay
the piece flat on its broad face on the drillpress table and make stopped,
overlapping Forstner bores for parallel, it that's what you're after.

I find a circle cutting jig to be an excellent way to do round things, as it
keeps you from the other blade-destroyer, turning the blank/blade while not
cutting.  No choice but to cut with the jig.

 
 
 

Carbide bandsaw blades

Post by Arc » Sat, 20 Jan 2007 04:14:14


Steve, I know you asked about carbide bandsaw blades, but for green wood
how often do you need to interpose a bandsaw between your chain saw and
a tool that's made for making wood round ...the lathe?

Turn to Safety,  Arch                        
                                                  Fortiter

http://community.webtv.net/almcc/MacsMusings

 
 
 

Carbide bandsaw blades

Post by robo hipp » Sat, 20 Jan 2007 05:17:13


While it isn't a necessity, a big bandsaw for preping blanks saves huge
amounts of time. As a production turner, I had to have one. It cuts the
log up faster, you parallel top and bottom, and a better circle. This
means that you can start turning at higher speeds, and there is less
roughing to do. It has cut my prep and turning time almost in half. The
bandsaw does a much better job than a chainsaw. You don't need carbide
blades for bowl blanks.
robo hippy
Quote:

> Steve, I know you asked about carbide bandsaw blades, but for green wood
> how often do you need to interpose a bandsaw between your chain saw and
> a tool that's made for making wood round ...the lathe?

> Turn to Safety,  Arch
>                                                   Fortiter

> http://community.webtv.net/almcc/MacsMusings

 
 
 

Carbide bandsaw blades

Post by massman » Sat, 20 Jan 2007 06:02:23


Thanks for all the help.  My main need to is to get bigger logs round
so that i can put them on my limited Jet 1236.   It doesnt do well with
large octagons blanks.

I will look into resharpening and also staying with timberwolf blades.

Steve

 
 
 

Carbide bandsaw blades

Post by l.vander.. » Sat, 20 Jan 2007 13:41:26


Hi Steve

But if you want to make larger turnings, you should maybe get a larger
lathe, or saw the corners of the octagonal blanks one more time with
your chain saw while you are at it anyway, ;-)))))

But seriously, if the above isn't in the cards, ( I seldom use my band
saw for making bowl blanks, but I do sometimes),  use the silicon steel
bands, that are thicker than normal .032" 4 TPI 1/2" wide, the blades
have a wider set and they are called the "turner/carver bands" by the
makers,(where I get them from) but you need wheels that are larger than
12" I think it is, I was paying something like 15 cents an inch, and
for that price it is pretty hard to do better with carbide teeth bands
IMO.

Have fun and take care
Leo Van Der Loo

Quote:

> I am needing to purchase a new bandsaw blade.  I have had good luck
> with the timberwolf  3tpi x 1/2" blades but they dont seem to last very
> long.   I mainly use my Grizzly G1019 (w/ riser ) bandsaw for cutting
> blanks before mounting on my jet 1236.  I do trim most of the blanks
> with a chainsaw before making round on bandsaw.  So there is still some
> bark which is probably dulling the blade.  I mainly use green wood that
> is about 6" deep or less.

> So what are everyone thoughts on carbide blades for rounding blanks.

> Here is the one I was looking at purchasing.
> http://www.grizzly.com/products/H6998
>  At $53 if it would out last two timberwolf blades it would be more
> economical.  

> Thanks for your thoughts,
> Steve Massman

 
 
 

Carbide bandsaw blades

Post by Bria » Sat, 20 Jan 2007 14:12:01


I have used the carbide blades for resawing and cutting blanks.  I will only
use it on something that I know for sure doesn't have rocks in it.  I was
making venier from a madrona burl and had the misfortune to find a rock in
it, or rather the blade did and as it was a 3/4 it could not be resharpened.
They are costly.  Stick with the bimetals.

Brian

 
 
 

Carbide bandsaw blades

Post by Prometheu » Sat, 20 Jan 2007 19:09:24




Quote:
>I am lucky to have a Lennox blade dealer here in town, and can get
>anything that I need from him. For general bowl blank roughing a
>bimetal blade works best. They last a lot longer than other blades.
>While I haven't used anything else, I have several friends who have
>switched to them and this is what they have told me. They are a utility
>blade and good for rough work. I do have a carbide tipped blade that
>costs about double what a bimetal blade does (150 inch by 1 1/4 blade
>$75 to $180). I did use one for bowl blanks for a while just to see how
>they did. They work fine, but don't seem to last any longer. They are
>made for resawing board stock, and the dealer said that they are a must
>have if you are planning to resaw your own veneers. I can get a surface
>that needs almost no sanding with them, but are overkill for bowls.
>robo hippy

I spent a lot of time in front of industrial bandsaws over the years,
and the conclusion I came to was the same as above- the Lennox
bi-metal blades will cut almost as long and just as well as carbide
tipped, and cost less.  They're just plain tough, and if they can cut
steel 24 hours a day for a week or better, I can't imagine that there
are many woods that are going to hurt them much!
 
 
 

Carbide bandsaw blades

Post by l.vander.. » Sun, 21 Jan 2007 04:02:23


Hi Prometheus

The problem with the bi-metal blades is to many TPI and not enough set
on them for sawing wet wood, they'll bind up and do just not work well
sawing wet wood I found, the once or twice I tried sawing wood on my
saw with the Bi-metal in place, also most BI-metal bands are wider than
thicker than the wood bands, they need more power and bigger wheel
sizes.
One other thing that does make a big difference is the saw speed in
metal sawing or wood sawing, where the wood sawing blades feed at
approx. 10X the speed of steel blades, as speed goes up so does the
friction and heat, but if you can find some bi-metal bands that do have
the 3 or 4 TPI with a good wide set than it might be more economical to
use one of those.

Have fun and take care
Leo Van Der Loo

http://homepage.mac.com/l.vanderloo/PhotoAlbum22.html

Quote:



> >I am lucky to have a Lennox blade dealer here in town, and can get
> >anything that I need from him. For general bowl blank roughing a
> >bimetal blade works best. They last a lot longer than other blades.
> >While I haven't used anything else, I have several friends who have
> >switched to them and this is what they have told me. They are a utility
> >blade and good for rough work. I do have a carbide tipped blade that
> >costs about double what a bimetal blade does (150 inch by 1 1/4 blade
> >$75 to $180). I did use one for bowl blanks for a while just to see how
> >they did. They work fine, but don't seem to last any longer. They are
> >made for resawing board stock, and the dealer said that they are a must
> >have if you are planning to resaw your own veneers. I can get a surface
> >that needs almost no sanding with them, but are overkill for bowls.
> >robo hippy

> I spent a lot of time in front of industrial bandsaws over the years,
> and the conclusion I came to was the same as above- the Lennox
> bi-metal blades will cut almost as long and just as well as carbide
> tipped, and cost less.  They're just plain tough, and if they can cut
> steel 24 hours a day for a week or better, I can't imagine that there
> are many woods that are going to hurt them much!

 
 
 

Carbide bandsaw blades

Post by Prometheu » Sun, 21 Jan 2007 07:11:47



Quote:

>Hi Prometheus

>The problem with the bi-metal blades is to many TPI and not enough set
>on them for sawing wet wood, they'll bind up and do just not work well
>sawing wet wood I found, the once or twice I tried sawing wood on my
>saw with the Bi-metal in place, also most BI-metal bands are wider than
>thicker than the wood bands, they need more power and bigger wheel
>sizes.
>One other thing that does make a big difference is the saw speed in
>metal sawing or wood sawing, where the wood sawing blades feed at
>approx. 10X the speed of steel blades, as speed goes up so does the
>friction and heat, but if you can find some bi-metal bands that do have
>the 3 or 4 TPI with a good wide set than it might be more economical to
>use one of those.

Speed may be a big factor, now that you mention it- but TPI doesn't
really need to be.  

There were two common tooth sets that I've used in steel fabrication-
2-3 and 3-4.  Each used an alternating tooth count, as I'm sure you
can guess by the designation, 2 tpi on one inch, and 3 on the next.
The 2-3s gave a fairly rough finish on metal, but would be pretty good
for wood, and IIRC, they had a fairly good set to them- I do recall
turning off the coolant and sawing large oak beams a couple of times
for things like rebuilding the loading dock after a careless truck
driver managed to rip off the bumpers, and building heavy shop stands.
It was a mess to clean the chips out of a saw with a coolant tray, but
it ripped through those massive beams like they were paper.

That being said, they *were* wide and thick- you've got a point there.
The ones I've used had a kerf of .063", and were 1.25" wide.  That
1/16" kerf did not reflect the simple thickness of the blade- it was
due to the set of the teeth.  The blades themselves were .032" thick,
and the rest was set.  Just for comparison, the carbide toothed blades
had a kerf of over .125"  Even if they were sharper, that's still
quite a lot more material to remove.

But you've got to have some pretty big wheels in the bandsaw to run
those suckers- perhaps my thinking was incorrect when I assumed that
Lennox makes smaller versions for other saws.  I think, but do not
recall for certain, that they do make similar blades with a thinner
band for the smaller cut-off saws, which are not that different from a
vertical wood bandsaw.  Then again, my somewhat hazy recollection (the
smaller cutoffs were secondary only) is of 3/4" wide bands with a
slightly finer tooth count- perhaps 5-6.  If that's the biggest bite
they've got, they may not work for resawing- but in any case, I'd
still go for the bi-metals over carbide bandsaw blades in a heartbeat!

Thinking back on this made me recall one other thing about bandsaw
blades I never really considered in the wood shop.  The Lennox
bi-metal blades were "self sharpening"- that isn't to say that they
stayed perpetually sharp, but rather that they required a much lighter
feed pressure and slower band speed when they were installed new for
the first 10 cubic inches (in steel) of the material cut.  Ignoring
that break-in procedure reduced the life of the blade by almost %75.
I don't know if the same logic applies to wood bandsaws, but it may be
worth a little investigation.  Hard to say how a guy might slow down
the band speed with a saw that has only one speed, but it's certainly
not difficult to reduce the feed rate for the first (100?) cubic
inches of hardwood cut, and it might help the blades last longer and
cut better.

 
 
 

Carbide bandsaw blades

Post by Bria » Sun, 21 Jan 2007 12:11:46


I have used the 3-4 carbide on wood and the finish was outstanding.  I did a
bunch of fine boxes that required very little sanding.

Brian

 
 
 

Carbide bandsaw blades

Post by Georg » Sun, 21 Jan 2007 21:17:28



Quote:
> Thinking back on this made me recall one other thing about bandsaw
> blades I never really considered in the wood shop.  The Lennox
> bi-metal blades were "self sharpening"- that isn't to say that they
> stayed perpetually sharp, but rather that they required a much lighter
> feed pressure and slower band speed when they were installed new for
> the first 10 cubic inches (in steel) of the material cut.  Ignoring
> that break-in procedure reduced the life of the blade by almost %75.
> I don't know if the same logic applies to wood bandsaws, but it may be
> worth a little investigation.  Hard to say how a guy might slow down
> the band speed with a saw that has only one speed, but it's certainly
> not difficult to reduce the feed rate for the first (100?) cubic
> inches of hardwood cut, and it might help the blades last longer and
> cut better.

Some even recommend such a procedure.  Notably the ones I purchased from
Woodworkers' Supply when they had a deal on 'em.  Never seen it elsewhere.