Teflon coated Bandsaw Baldes??

Teflon coated Bandsaw Baldes??

Post by Stev » Mon, 19 Jan 1998 04:00:00



Recently I was resawing green/wet Red Oak and Mulberry on the bandsaw.
During the four hour session I noticed that familiar gum/rosin buildup
on the bandsaw blade. It's not easy to get off and while cleaning it I
wished for somthing like Teflon coated blades :-). The gunk would have
to really work to stick on then - Ha!

Just curious how you reduce or eliminate (dreaming) the ***y buildup
whilst you are resawing wet/green woods? Do you spray lubricant on the
blade while cutting? Both sides of the blade? Wax perhaps? Got some
secret wonder goo? Hey Carlo, put some of that white coating on your
bandsaw blades! <grin>

I have tried a few things, all did little or nothing. I resaw
significant amounts of wet timbers for turning project material. In a
few days I will be processing a large amount of Mulberry, Water Oak,
Juniper, Carob and Chinese Elm. Just hoping to eliminate or reduce the
inevitable downtime cleaning the ***y blade.

Letting the chips fly...
Steve
Eurowood Werks

 
 
 

Teflon coated Bandsaw Baldes??

Post by Rev Chuc » Mon, 19 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> In the Suffork handbook they recommend using Pam on the blade (both sides)
> as a lubricant.

This is completely off topic, of course, but next time you're shoveling
snow, spray a generous coating of Pam on the shovel, and the job will
take half the time, half the effort.  You'll think the snow actually
weighs less.

 
 
 

Teflon coated Bandsaw Baldes??

Post by Howard Kleppe » Tue, 20 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Steve:

Pam helps a lot.  The stuff you spray on your waffle iron.  Rather than
spray on the blade, which gets it everywhere, i spray some on a rag,
then hold the rag to the sides of the blade while rotating the upper
wheel by hand.  Rotate backwards so the teeth don't grab the rag.  You
will notice a smoother, quieter cut, and the crud doesn't stick to the
inner side of the blade.  It wears off fast.  If you want to keep the
blade clean you have to Pam it very frequently.  But the stuff is cheap.

Howard

Quote:

> Recently I was resawing green/wet Red Oak and Mulberry on the bandsaw.
> During the four hour session I noticed that familiar gum/rosin buildup
> on the bandsaw blade. It's not easy to get off and while cleaning it I
> wished for somthing like Teflon coated blades :-). The gunk would have
> to really work to stick on then - Ha!

> Just curious how you reduce or eliminate (dreaming) the ***y buildup
> whilst you are resawing wet/green woods? Do you spray lubricant on the
> blade while cutting? Both sides of the blade? Wax perhaps? Got some
> secret wonder goo? Hey Carlo, put some of that white coating on your
> bandsaw blades! <grin>

> I have tried a few things, all did little or nothing. I resaw
> significant amounts of wet timbers for turning project material. In a
> few days I will be processing a large amount of Mulberry, Water Oak,
> Juniper, Carob and Chinese Elm. Just hoping to eliminate or reduce the
> inevitable downtime cleaning the ***y blade.

> Letting the chips fly...
> Steve
> Eurowood Werks

 
 
 

Teflon coated Bandsaw Baldes??

Post by Fred Holde » Tue, 20 Jan 1998 04:00:00



Quote:

>Recently I was resawing green/wet Red Oak and Mulberry on the bandsaw.
>During the four hour session I noticed that familiar gum/rosin buildup
>on the bandsaw blade. It's not easy to get off and while cleaning it I
>wished for somthing like Teflon coated blades :-). The gunk would have
>to really work to stick on then - Ha!

>Just curious how you reduce or eliminate (dreaming) the ***y buildup
>whilst you are resawing wet/green woods? Do you spray lubricant on the
>blade while cutting? Both sides of the blade? Wax perhaps? Got some
>secret wonder goo? Hey Carlo, put some of that white coating on your
>bandsaw blades! <grin>

>I have tried a few things, all did little or nothing. I resaw
>significant amounts of wet timbers for turning project material. In a
>few days I will be processing a large amount of Mulberry, Water Oak,
>Juniper, Carob and Chinese Elm. Just hoping to eliminate or reduce the
>inevitable downtime cleaning the ***y blade.

>Letting the chips fly...
>Steve
>Eurowood Werks

Hello Steve,

There is a product on the market called "Slip-It" which just might do what you
want. It worked great on a table saw early last year when I was cutting the
corners off of some old growth fir to make it small enought to fit on my lathe.
I sprayed it on the blade and the table. Really made it slick. Stuff is
available in a paint on version or in a spray can. It becomes a dry slick that
is very effective. I've not tried it on the bandsaw. If you try it please report
back.

Fred Holder
<http://www.FoundCollection.com/;

 
 
 

Teflon coated Bandsaw Baldes??

Post by Greg Kuliber » Tue, 20 Jan 1998 04:00:00


In the Suffork handbook they recommend using Pam on the blade (both sides)
as a lubricant.

Quote:

> Recently I was resawing green/wet Red Oak and Mulberry on the bandsaw.
> During the four hour session I noticed that familiar gum/rosin buildup
> on the bandsaw blade. It's not easy to get off and while cleaning it I
> wished for somthing like Teflon coated blades :-). The gunk would have
> to really work to stick on then - Ha!

> Just curious how you reduce or eliminate (dreaming) the ***y buildup
> whilst you are resawing wet/green woods? Do you spray lubricant on the
> blade while cutting? Both sides of the blade? Wax perhaps? Got some
> secret wonder goo? Hey Carlo, put some of that white coating on your
> bandsaw blades! <grin>

> I have tried a few things, all did little or nothing. I resaw
> significant amounts of wet timbers for turning project material. In a
> few days I will be processing a large amount of Mulberry, Water Oak,
> Juniper, Carob and Chinese Elm. Just hoping to eliminate or reduce the
> inevitable downtime cleaning the ***y blade.

> Letting the chips fly...
> Steve
> Eurowood Werks

 
 
 

Teflon coated Bandsaw Baldes??

Post by Dan MacGrad » Wed, 21 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Dear Steve;
        In metalworking I have used Ivory Soap(bar soap) to lubricate the blade of
a bandsaw.  I never used it on wood but it might work for what you want.
Just push the bar into the blade until it's coated.  Best of luck.
--
remove nospam from below to respond


Quote:
> Recently I was resawing green/wet Red Oak and Mulberry on the bandsaw.
> During the four hour session I noticed that familiar gum/rosin buildup
> on the bandsaw blade. It's not easy to get off and while cleaning it I
> wished for somthing like Teflon coated blades :-). The gunk would have
> to really work to stick on then - Ha!

> Just curious how you reduce or eliminate (dreaming) the ***y buildup
> whilst you are resawing wet/green woods? Do you spray lubricant on the
> blade while cutting? Both sides of the blade? Wax perhaps? Got some
> secret wonder goo? Hey Carlo, put some of that white coating on your
> bandsaw blades! <grin>

> I have tried a few things, all did little or nothing. I resaw
> significant amounts of wet timbers for turning project material. In a
> few days I will be processing a large amount of Mulberry, Water Oak,
> Juniper, Carob and Chinese Elm. Just hoping to eliminate or reduce the
> inevitable downtime cleaning the ***y blade.

> Letting the chips fly...
> Steve
> Eurowood Werks

 
 
 

Teflon coated Bandsaw Baldes??

Post by Erle Eva » Wed, 21 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

>Recently I was resawing green/wet Red Oak and Mulberry on the bandsaw.
>During the four hour session I noticed that familiar gum/rosin buildup
>on the bandsaw blade. It's not easy to get off and while cleaning it I
>wished for somthing like Teflon coated blades :-). The gunk would have
>to really work to stick on then - Ha!

>Just curious how you reduce or eliminate (dreaming) the ***y buildup
>whilst you are resawing wet/green woods? Do you spray lubricant on the
>blade while cutting? Both sides of the blade? Wax perhaps? Got some
>secret wonder goo? Hey Carlo, put some of that white coating on your
>bandsaw blades! <grin>

>I have tried a few things, all did little or nothing. I resaw
>significant amounts of wet timbers for turning project material. In a
>few days I will be processing a large amount of Mulberry, Water Oak,
>Juniper, Carob and Chinese Elm. Just hoping to eliminate or reduce the
>inevitable downtime cleaning the ***y blade.

>Letting the chips fly...
>Steve
>Eurowood Werks

Steve.
   This will not prevent the sap build up on the blade but may make
for a quicker cleaning job. I use Eucalyptus oil sold by major grocery
stores or chemists=drug stores. It dissolves the gum much quicker.

Regards.
Wally Evans.   (down under).

 
 
 

Teflon coated Bandsaw Baldes??

Post by R.J. Perz-Edwar » Sun, 25 Jan 1998 04:00:00


didn't old-time lumberjacks set up a drip can to drip kerosene onto the
blade when using a 2 man cross-cut to fell a tree?  particularly good
for pines as it will dissolve the resin.

don't know if you'd really want to do this with a band saw, as it might damage
tire or the bearings, and may well be a fire hazzard, but it's a thought.  maybe
a bad one.


Quote:

> Recently I was resawing green/wet Red Oak and Mulberry on the bandsaw.
> During the four hour session I noticed that familiar gum/rosin buildup
> on the bandsaw blade. It's not easy to get off and while cleaning it I
> wished for somthing like Teflon coated blades :-). The gunk would have
> to really work to stick on then - Ha!

> Just curious how you reduce or eliminate (dreaming) the ***y buildup
> whilst you are resawing wet/green woods? Do you spray lubricant on the
> blade while cutting? Both sides of the blade? Wax perhaps? Got some
> secret wonder goo? Hey Carlo, put some of that white coating on your
> bandsaw blades! <grin>

> I have tried a few things, all did little or nothing. I resaw
> significant amounts of wet timbers for turning project material. In a
> few days I will be processing a large amount of Mulberry, Water Oak,
> Juniper, Carob and Chinese Elm. Just hoping to eliminate or reduce the
> inevitable downtime cleaning the ***y blade.

> Letting the chips fly...
> Steve
> Eurowood Werks

 
 
 

Teflon coated Bandsaw Baldes??

Post by Joseph S. Wisniewsk » Tue, 27 Jan 1998 04:00:00


I don't know how applicable it is to a wood bandsaw, but glass cutting
bandsaws (and circular saws) have a resevior full of coolant/lubricant
that the bottom portion of the bottom wheel runs through. My glass saw
uses something called "water soluable cutting oil" (at least that's what
it says on the bottle) that hasn't caught on fire yet. What it would do
to the tires or the wood is anyone's guess. How about an oil that is
compatible with wood and tools?

When I'm boring long holes for flutes with a D bit, I frequently dip the
bit in raw linseed oil. I can see either a resevior that the lower wheel
runs through, or a mister spraying oil on the belt. Sounds like fun to
clean up oafer a session.

Quote:

> didn't old-time lumberjacks set up a drip can to drip kerosene onto the
> blade when using a 2 man cross-cut to fell a tree?  particularly good
> for pines as it will dissolve the resin.

> don't know if you'd really want to do this with a band saw, as it might damage
> tire or the bearings, and may well be a fire hazzard, but it's a thought.  maybe
> a bad one.



> > Recently I was resawing green/wet Red Oak and Mulberry on the bandsaw.
> > During the four hour session I noticed that familiar gum/rosin buildup
> > on the bandsaw blade. It's not easy to get off and while cleaning it I
> > wished for somthing like Teflon coated blades :-). The gunk would have
> > to really work to stick on then - Ha!

--
 Joseph S. Wisniewski | Views expressed are my own, and don't reflect
  Ford Motor Company  |   those of the Ford Motor Co. or affiliates.
   Project Sapphire   | LeMans, Daytona, Bonneville, and Sebring are