Please Help With Saw Choice

Please Help With Saw Choice

Post by James D. Farro » Tue, 19 Oct 2004 05:03:13



Hi!

I will be getting the Jet 1014 Mini Wood Lathe to turn bowls, vases, boxes,
etc...

And I need a saw to prepare the blanks as much as possible.

I have narrowed it down to 2 types that I (a newbie) gather could do the
job.

The choices are based on available space and budget.

1) Delta - 9" Bench Top Band Saw - BS100
1/3 HP Motor, 115v
Throat Depth: 9", 3 3/4" under guide.
Table: 11 3/8" x 11 3/8" . Tilts 45 Degrees Right, 3 Degrees Left.
Blade: 59 1/2". 1/8" Minimun, 3/8" Maximun
33 Lbs - $149.00

or

2) Delta - 16" Variable Speed Scroll Saw - SS250
2 Amp, 115v
Speeds: 400 to 1800 RPM
Table: 11 3/4" Diameter, Tilts 45 Degrees Left
Blade: 5", 2" maximun thickness.
47 lbs - $149.00

Now I know the band saw is probably the better tool for the job but I have
searched around and it gets pretty negative reviews all round.
The ones that are recommended are either to large for the limited space I
have or more than I want to spend.

So, I was wondering if the scroll saw, which gets all round good reviews,
would suit my needs just as well.

I plan on getting most of the wood in rounds or in squares, rectangles,
etc...  in 1/2" to 2" thicknesses, so I don't think I need a "lot of saw" to
prepare the blanks. Just cutting boards into squares and then rounding them
out. I was planning on gluing blanks together to get the desired thicknesses
for vases, etc... when I need the blanks to be thicker.
I like the idea of mixing different kinds of woods together.

So, would the scroll saw be appropriate?

Or am I barking up the wrong tree (no pun intended) ? LOL!

Thanks,

James

 
 
 

Please Help With Saw Choice

Post by Arc » Tue, 19 Oct 2004 06:36:57


James, I don't know your turning ability, but if this is a first lathe,
you might consider small green logs and limbs? You already have the best
tool to make them round; your new lathe. Instead of laminated dry
expensive planks, green wood blanks are easy to prepare and hold and
making those long shavings is fun. There's much less dust, a wide
variety of timber and no gluing. You can choose cross grain or long
grain, also natural edges. The wood is cost free and you learn much
about trees & wood.  Beg, borrow or steal O'Donnell's book or video
about green wood.  

I favor neither a bad bandsaw nor a good scroll saw for your purposes,
but if I have missed the mark re your experience, my apology. If not,
for now, for limbing and preparation I suggest using a handsaw or buying
an inexpensive small electric chainsaw that you won't quickly outgrow.
Whatever your decision, have fun and 'turn to safety'.   Regards,  Arch

                   Fortiter,

http://community.webtv.net/almcc/MacsMusings

 
 
 

Please Help With Saw Choice

Post by Denis Marie » Tue, 19 Oct 2004 08:08:03


As stated by Arch: a small electric chain saw is a good start.

From what I have learned, medium size (14 inch) band saw are only good to
round up blanks under 8 inches outside diameter. Above 7-8 inches most
people are using a chain saw to cut the blank into an octagonal shape. What
it's needed most is low rpm on your lathe. If your lathe can run at 200 rpm
or lower you will not require well balance and rounded blanks. Thus
eliminating an expensive band saw to cut blanks.
As for chain saw I have an electric and a gas operated one.
When working in your garage/shop a good quality electric chain saw makes
sense. You can use it on evening and Sunday morning without annoying your
neighbor and inhaling  gas fume in a close environment.
When felling, bucking trees and ripping blanks outside a gas operated chain
saw is independent of electricity and works faster.  Remember that you will
have to learn how to sharpen your chainsaw in the field and in you shop.
Conclusion:  Start with an electric chainsaw and work your way up as you
learn.
Selecting band saw and chain saw would better be served by having separates
discussions.


Quote:
> James, I don't know your turning ability, but if this is a first lathe,
> you might consider small green logs and limbs? You already have the best
> tool to make them round; your new lathe. Instead of laminated dry
> expensive planks, green wood blanks are easy to prepare and hold and
> making those long shavings is fun. There's much less dust, a wide
> variety of timber and no gluing. You can choose cross grain or long
> grain, also natural edges. The wood is cost free and you learn much
> about trees & wood.  Beg, borrow or steal O'Donnell's book or video
> about green wood.

> I favor neither a bad bandsaw nor a good scroll saw for your purposes,
> but if I have missed the mark re your experience, my apology. If not,
> for now, for limbing and preparation I suggest using a handsaw or buying
> an inexpensive small electric chainsaw that you won't quickly outgrow.
> Whatever your decision, have fun and 'turn to safety'.   Regards,  Arch

>                    Fortiter,

> http://community.webtv.net/almcc/MacsMusings

 
 
 

Please Help With Saw Choice

Post by ted harri » Tue, 19 Oct 2004 11:53:50



Quote:

> 1) Delta - 9" Bench Top Band Saw - BS100
> 1/3 HP Motor, 115v
> Throat Depth: 9", 3 3/4" under guide.
> Table: 11 3/8" x 11 3/8" . Tilts 45 Degrees Right, 3 Degrees Left.
> Blade: 59 1/2". 1/8" Minimun, 3/8" Maximun
> 33 Lbs - $149.00
> or
> 2) Delta - 16" Variable Speed Scroll Saw - SS250
> 2 Amp, 115v
> Speeds: 400 to 1800 RPM
> Table: 11 3/4" Diameter, Tilts 45 Degrees Left
> Blade: 5", 2" maximun thickness.
> 47 lbs - $149.00
> Thanks,

> James

You can get either one of these at Amazon.com with free shipping and no tax
for $99.00 each.
--
Ted Harris
http://www.tedharris.com

(remove .NOJUNK to reply)
 
 
 

Please Help With Saw Choice

Post by Ecnerwa » Tue, 19 Oct 2004 09:32:36




Quote:
> I will be getting the Jet 1014 Mini Wood Lathe to turn bowls, vases, boxes,
> etc...

> And I need a saw to prepare the blanks as much as possible.

I'd agree with Arch as to neither of those you've selected, though I'm
not altogether sure that the chainsaw is your best bet, depending what
you are working on.

On the whole, I'd say your best bet is to find a lathe with a drive
system that has a lower slowest speed (both the 1014 and the 1014VS are
500 rpm slowest), at which point the need to saw is greatly reduced -
you just chuck stuff up and turn it round, increasing the speed as you
get it closer to being in balance.

Natually, the only commonly offered motorless mini-lathe (that I can
quickly find online, anyway) is the Vicmarc that costs more without a
motor than a Jet with a motor, but that would allow you to hang a nice
variable speed motor on it and have a quality setup. Permanent magnet DC
motors and speed controls from treadmills that have bitten the dust are
often available quite inexpensively (even free if you talk nicely to the
folks at the transfer station/landfill), and offer speed right down to
nothing, usually.

A decent quality frame saw (hand saw with high-tension blade) can do a
very decent and quick job of sawing stuff out, is cheaper than both of
the saws you mentioned unless you go hog-wild, and takes up a lot less
space in the shop. The 9" bandsaw is a waste of money, shop space, time,
and will provide many opportunities to exercise profanity before you
finally heave it in the dumpster or offer it up for $5 at a yard sale.
If you think you want one, go looking for them at yard sales - they show
up frequently, for good reason. The scrollsaw does not excel at cutting
2" material quickly, even though it's generally better unit, and it will
be frustrating for that purpose. A frame saw will cut rings around
either one.

The electric chainsaw is good if you work from logs, and most people do
find a great deal of satisfaction working from logs.

--
Cats, Coffee, Chocolate...vices to live by

 
 
 

Please Help With Saw Choice

Post by Bruce Taylo » Tue, 19 Oct 2004 10:02:57




Quote:
> Hi!

> I will be getting the Jet 1014 Mini Wood Lathe to turn bowls, vases, boxes,
> etc...

> And I need a saw to prepare the blanks as much as possible.

> I have narrowed it down to 2 types that I (a newbie) gather could do the
> job.

> The choices are based on available space and budget.

> 1) Delta - 9" Bench Top Band Saw - BS100
> 1/3 HP Motor, 115v
> Throat Depth: 9", 3 3/4" under guide.
> Table: 11 3/8" x 11 3/8" . Tilts 45 Degrees Right, 3 Degrees Left.
> Blade: 59 1/2". 1/8" Minimun, 3/8" Maximun
> 33 Lbs - $149.00

> or

> 2) Delta - 16" Variable Speed Scroll Saw - SS250
> 2 Amp, 115v
> Speeds: 400 to 1800 RPM
> Table: 11 3/4" Diameter, Tilts 45 Degrees Left
> Blade: 5", 2" maximun thickness.
> 47 lbs - $149.00

> Now I know the band saw is probably the better tool for the job but I have
> searched around and it gets pretty negative reviews all round.
> The ones that are recommended are either to large for the limited space I
> have or more than I want to spend.

> So, I was wondering if the scroll saw, which gets all round good reviews,
> would suit my needs just as well.

> I plan on getting most of the wood in rounds or in squares, rectangles,
> etc...  in 1/2" to 2" thicknesses, so I don't think I need a "lot of saw" to
> prepare the blanks. Just cutting boards into squares and then rounding them
> out. I was planning on gluing blanks together to get the desired thicknesses
> for vases, etc... when I need the blanks to be thicker.
> I like the idea of mixing different kinds of woods together.

> So, would the scroll saw be appropriate?

> Or am I barking up the wrong tree (no pun intended) ? LOL!

> Thanks,

> James

I share the concerns of the other responders. The little Delta 9" bandsaw
will be nothing but headaches, and is underpowered for cutting turning
stock anyhow; and the scroll saw won't have enough clearance for a bowl
blank. Instead, I would shop the local classifieds or used tool dealers
looking for an older bandsaw. In my local papers, old Delta 16" saws
go for around $300, and Sears 12" go for around $150. More than you're
planning to spend, but if you can stretch a little you'll be much, much
happier.

Peace,
Bruce

 
 
 

Please Help With Saw Choice

Post by James D. Farro » Tue, 19 Oct 2004 11:26:10


Well, I think I will go with the hand saw idea for roughing out the blanks
and look into getting something better later on.

Thanks again for the replies.

James



Quote:
> Hi!

> I will be getting the Jet 1014 Mini Wood Lathe to turn bowls, vases,
boxes,
> etc...

> And I need a saw to prepare the blanks as much as possible.

> I have narrowed it down to 2 types that I (a newbie) gather could do the
> job.

> The choices are based on available space and budget.

> 1) Delta - 9" Bench Top Band Saw - BS100
> 1/3 HP Motor, 115v
> Throat Depth: 9", 3 3/4" under guide.
> Table: 11 3/8" x 11 3/8" . Tilts 45 Degrees Right, 3 Degrees Left.
> Blade: 59 1/2". 1/8" Minimun, 3/8" Maximun
> 33 Lbs - $149.00

> or

> 2) Delta - 16" Variable Speed Scroll Saw - SS250
> 2 Amp, 115v
> Speeds: 400 to 1800 RPM
> Table: 11 3/4" Diameter, Tilts 45 Degrees Left
> Blade: 5", 2" maximun thickness.
> 47 lbs - $149.00

> Now I know the band saw is probably the better tool for the job but I have
> searched around and it gets pretty negative reviews all round.
> The ones that are recommended are either to large for the limited space I
> have or more than I want to spend.

> So, I was wondering if the scroll saw, which gets all round good reviews,
> would suit my needs just as well.

> I plan on getting most of the wood in rounds or in squares, rectangles,
> etc...  in 1/2" to 2" thicknesses, so I don't think I need a "lot of saw"
to
> prepare the blanks. Just cutting boards into squares and then rounding
them
> out. I was planning on gluing blanks together to get the desired
thicknesses
> for vases, etc... when I need the blanks to be thicker.
> I like the idea of mixing different kinds of woods together.

> So, would the scroll saw be appropriate?

> Or am I barking up the wrong tree (no pun intended) ? LOL!

> Thanks,

> James

 
 
 

Please Help With Saw Choice

Post by Ken Moo » Tue, 19 Oct 2004 13:44:26




Quote:
> Well, I think I will go with the hand saw idea for roughing out the blanks
> and look into getting something better later on.

> Thanks again for the replies.

> James

=========================
James,
For the purpose you're looking at, a "bow saw" would be a good choice. If
you're not familiar with them, they're like an oversize hack saw, but with a
wood cutting blade (think of the blades on cross cut saws). It will cut
blanks much faster than a conventional hand saw will, and is far superior in
wet wood. It's mainly used for small tree cutting and big limb t***, so
you can also use it for harvesting some of your smaller log pieces. They're
available at HD, Lowes, etc. for under $10.00; get a couple of spare blades
while you're at it.

Ken Moon
Webberville, TX

 
 
 

Please Help With Saw Choice

Post by Larr » Tue, 19 Oct 2004 20:44:58


<snip> From what I have learned, medium size (14 inch) band saw are
only good to
round up blanks under 8 inches outside diameter. <snip>

Wherever did you "learn" this?  My 14" can cut rounds at least twice
that just using the table and of any size if I provide support beyond
the table. Are you thinking of thickness?  If so, then the limit is
about 6" thick without riser blocks and 12" with them.

 
 
 

Please Help With Saw Choice

Post by Georg » Tue, 19 Oct 2004 20:44:06


Note, however, that the bowsaws Ken refers to are crosscut patterns.  Might
want to look into an actual bowsaw with rip and crosscut blades, or get a
good ripsaw.  Your arm will thank you.


Quote:



> > Well, I think I will go with the hand saw idea for roughing out the
blanks
> > and look into getting something better later on.

> > Thanks again for the replies.

> > James
> =========================
> James,
> For the purpose you're looking at, a "bow saw" would be a good choice. If
> you're not familiar with them, they're like an oversize hack saw, but with
a
> wood cutting blade (think of the blades on cross cut saws). It will cut
> blanks much faster than a conventional hand saw will, and is far superior
in
> wet wood. It's mainly used for small tree cutting and big limb t***,
so
> you can also use it for harvesting some of your smaller log pieces.
They're
> available at HD, Lowes, etc. for under $10.00; get a couple of spare
blades
> while you're at it.

> Ken Moon
> Webberville, TX