CA pen finishing

CA pen finishing

Post by Margret Huntres » Thu, 30 Dec 2004 06:07:44



Hi,  I have heard of finishing pens with CA glue, but I'm a bit hesitant to
try it.  I've been using Myland friction polish, but was told this would
give a better finish.  How would I go about using CA?  Is it really better?
Thanks,

Tom

 
 
 

CA pen finishing

Post by Mike » Thu, 30 Dec 2004 07:34:39


Quote:

> Hi,  I have heard of finishing pens with CA glue, but I'm a bit hesitant to
> try it.  I've been using Myland friction polish, but was told this would
> give a better finish.  How would I go about using CA?  Is it really better?
> Thanks,

One way to use CA is with BLO (Boiled Linseed Oil).  Sand the turned pen to
whatever you want, then I use Mylands Sanding Sealer and resand with my last
two grades of paper - just lightly.

Then wet a paper towel with BLO and wipe it on (lathe turning at slowest
speed) then rewet the towel with BLO and while applying it on the bottom drip
thin CA on top - all along the length.  Once along the pen is enough.  Let it
dry, and if you want use you final grit and sand once more, very lightly.
Then put on one (or more) coats of the BLO/CA.

Is this better?  I think it gives the pen a 'plastic' feel, very little feel
of the grain of the wood.  It does last a long time.  I've been carrying three
pens in my glasses case for about 6 months without the pens showing any wear.
Friction Polish is mainly shellac, and could (will) soften with ***, maybe
water (sweat).    It's your choice as to which is 'better'.

 
 
 

CA pen finishing

Post by Mike » Thu, 30 Dec 2004 07:35:13


Quote:

> Hi,  I have heard of finishing pens with CA glue, but I'm a bit hesitant to
> try it.  I've been using Myland friction polish, but was told this would
> give a better finish.  How would I go about using CA?  Is it really better?
> Thanks,

One way to use CA is with BLO (Boiled Linseed Oil).  Sand the turned pen to
whatever you want, then I use Mylands Sanding Sealer and resand with my last
two grades of paper - just lightly.

Then wet a paper towel with BLO and wipe it on (lathe turning at slowest
speed) then rewet the towel with BLO and while applying it on the bottom drip
thin CA on top - all along the length.  Once along the pen is enough.  Let it
dry, and if you want use you final grit and sand once more, very lightly.
Then put on one (or more) coats of the BLO/CA.

Is this better?  I think it gives the pen a 'plastic' feel, very little feel
of the grain of the wood.  It does last a long time.  I've been carrying three
pens in my glasses case for about 6 months without the pens showing any wear.
Friction Polish is mainly shellac, and could (will) soften with ***, maybe
water (sweat).    It's your choice as to which is 'better'.

 
 
 

CA pen finishing

Post by Tony Dentin » Thu, 30 Dec 2004 08:15:47


Margret,

Check penturners.org... They have complete instructions for CA glue
finishing plus a lot more penturning info.

http://www.penturners.org/forum/portal.asp

Tony

Quote:
> Hi,  I have heard of finishing pens with CA glue, but I'm a bit hesitant
> to try it.  I've been using Myland friction polish, but was told this
> would give a better finish.  How would I go about using CA?  Is it really
> better? Thanks,

> Tom

 
 
 

CA pen finishing

Post by Chuc » Thu, 30 Dec 2004 11:53:29


On Tue, 28 Dec 2004 21:07:44 GMT, "Margret Huntress"

Quote:

>Hi,  I have heard of finishing pens with CA glue, but I'm a bit hesitant to
>try it.  I've been using Myland friction polish, but was told this would
>give a better finish.  How would I go about using CA?  Is it really better?

IMO, pretty much anything is better than friction polish, which is
great until someone handles the pen.  I use CA glue on punky or
unstable woods, like spalted woods or pieces of burl, or a pink ivory
pen I just turned the other day with a knot in it.  It's really quite
easy to do, but make sure you have good ventilation because CA glue is
really irritating to the eyes and nose.

After you have sanded up to your finest grit, use thin CA and cover
the surface of the pen with the lathe off, smoothing it over the
surface with your finger with a piece of Saran Wrap, baggie or
something similar.  I use my bare finger, actually, and the glue
usually wears off by the end of my turning session.  In any case, give
the glue a few minutes to soak in and dry, then sand again, using the
finest grit you have.  I sometimes wet sand and sometimes dry,
depending on the wood.  After sanding, I will often use EEE-Ultrashine
and finally finish it off with pure carnauba wax, which give a nice,
durable, glossy shine.

As far as non-CA pens go, I use EEE Ultrashine, followed by sanding
sealer, buffed, then a coat or two of pure carnauba wax for a durable
shine.  Beats the heck out of friction finishes.
--
Chuck *#:^)
chaz3913(AT)yahoo(DOT)com
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