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Post by Tim » Fri, 19 Mar 1999 04:00:00



we have used***paint and more recently used paraffin wax to end coat
our wood
 i prefer the wax, but have had trouble with it staying on. does anyone
have a home made recipe that is not as messy as the paint? thanks, tim
 
 
 

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Post by Howard Kleppe » Fri, 19 Mar 1999 04:00:00


not homemade, but Anchorseal works well and adheres well to wet wood.

 
 
 

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Post by Kevin Morga » Fri, 19 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> we have used***paint and more recently used paraffin wax to end coat
> our wood
>  i prefer the wax, but have had trouble with it staying on. does anyone
> have a home made recipe that is not as messy as the paint? thanks, tim

Minwax's Wood Hardener is supposed to be good for this.

--


---------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
 

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Post by Jon Schillin » Fri, 19 Mar 1999 04:00:00


FWIW,
In the book about Rude Osolnik he states that he uses Anchor seal type of
coating on the entire outside of
his roughturned green bowls.   I had been using Anchor Seal for my rough
turned bowls and after seeing
Rude's comment I felt it was a COMMAND to continue.
Here in the Portland, Oregon area I buy it for $32.65 for 5 gallons.
If it was to be purch in 55 gal drums it is even cheaper.   Cheaper means
that it is less than the $15 that
our mail order folks charge.   11 guys get together and buy a drum, break it
down into 5 gallon pails
and you've saved a bunch.
(And, BTW, I've got an inventory of over 600 rough turned bowls.   I've had
some bowls crack and become
useless even after coating.    Mostly CHERRY, and some English Walnut bowls
where I tried to keep
a knot in the piece as a feature.   (The knot acts just like the pith, I
guess, and the tension seems to explode
the wood.   I've had some split where I guess I had the wall thickness too
thick for the species of wood.   I
had a 28" dia sycamore bowl with 2" thick walls and bottom and the bottoms
split out.)
Having said that, my failure rate has been roughly 20 out of the 600+ bowls)

Regards,
Jon Schilling

Quote:


>> we have used***paint and more recently used paraffin wax to end coat
>> our wood
>>  i prefer the wax, but have had trouble with it staying on. does anyone
>> have a home made recipe that is not as messy as the paint? thanks, tim

>Minwax's Wood Hardener is supposed to be good for this.

>--


>---------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
 

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Post by Howard Kleppe » Fri, 19 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Jon:

when I leave a knot in a rough bowl, I soak around the perimeter of the
knot with thin CA glue.  Seems to help.

Howard

 
 
 

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Post by Rex Hasli » Sat, 20 Mar 1999 04:00:00


I use MobilCer M

Its a wax emulsion and is actually a horticultural dressing that is applied
to pruning wounds.

Water soluable till the liquid dries when it sets as a wax layer, but is
still porous enough to allow the wood to "breathe" at a regulated rate.

Excellent stuff and comparitively cheap

Rex Haslip
Auckland
New Zealand



Quote:
> we have used***paint and more recently used paraffin wax to end coat
> our wood
>  i prefer the wax, but have had trouble with it staying on. does anyone
> have a home made recipe that is not as messy as the paint? thanks, tim

 
 
 

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Post by adrien coblent » Sat, 20 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Who supplies it?
Quote:

> I use MobilCer M

> Its a wax emulsion and is actually a horticultural dressing that is applied
> to pruning wounds.

> Water soluable till the liquid dries when it sets as a wax layer, but is
> still porous enough to allow the wood to "breathe" at a regulated rate.

> Excellent stuff and comparitively cheap

> Rex Haslip
> Auckland
> New Zealand



> > we have used***paint and more recently used paraffin wax to end coat
> > our wood
> >  i prefer the wax, but have had trouble with it staying on. does anyone
> > have a home made recipe that is not as messy as the paint? thanks, tim

 
 
 

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Post by (Steve Dixon » Sat, 20 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Do you only coat the outside?  I know the outside seems to dry faster,
but I am now in the habit of coating the whole bowl.  Maybe I don't
need to.  But occasionally I have bowls split on the inside and so
supperstitiously I just slop on the sealer.
Quote:

>FWIW,
>In the book about Rude Osolnik he states that he uses Anchor seal type of
>coating on the entire outside of
>his roughturned green bowls.   I had been using Anchor Seal for my rough
>turned bowls and after seeing
>Rude's comment I felt it was a COMMAND to continue.
>Here in the Portland, Oregon area I buy it for $32.65 for 5 gallons.
>If it was to be purch in 55 gal drums it is even cheaper.   Cheaper means
>that it is less than the $15 that
>our mail order folks charge.   11 guys get together and buy a drum, break it
>down into 5 gallon pails
>and you've saved a bunch.
>(And, BTW, I've got an inventory of over 600 rough turned bowls.   I've had
>some bowls crack and become
>useless even after coating.    Mostly CHERRY, and some English Walnut bowls
>where I tried to keep
>a knot in the piece as a feature.   (The knot acts just like the pith, I
>guess, and the tension seems to explode
>the wood.   I've had some split where I guess I had the wall thickness too
>thick for the species of wood.   I
>had a 28" dia sycamore bowl with 2" thick walls and bottom and the bottoms
>split out.)
>Having said that, my failure rate has been roughly 20 out of the 600+ bowls)

>Regards,
>Jon Schilling


>>> we have used***paint and more recently used paraffin wax to end coat
>>> our wood
>>>  i prefer the wax, but have had trouble with it staying on. does anyone
>>> have a home made recipe that is not as messy as the paint? thanks, tim

>>Minwax's Wood Hardener is supposed to be good for this.

>>--


>>---------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
 

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Post by Steve Russel » Sat, 20 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Hello Steve,

I'm just jumping in on this thread, but I may be able to help you a wee
bit. On my rough turned bowls, I coat the inside and outside of the
endgrain only. The side grain is not coated at all. The bowls are then
allowed to dry in the air on wire racks in the utility room. This has
heat and a/c and additional heat from an upright freezer and a clothes
dryer.

On burls, I coat the entire bowl, inside and out because endgrain is
everywhere. However, if you coat the inside and outside of standard
(non-burl) timbers it will not hurt anything. It will take longer for
the bowl to dry however.

Another possibility is to coat the endgrain (inside/outside) and put
them into paper grocery bags. This creates a microclimate of high
humidity inside the bag as the free water and subsequent bound water
leaves the blank. The paper lets just enough water vapor out at just the
right rate to prevent degrade. Roll up the end of the bag and stack them
up to dry.

This paper bag method has worked exceptionally well with only 1% of
waste in my production studio. This includes crotch platters, burls,
fiddleback bowls and other high figured timbers that can be troublesome
to dry successfully.

I recently held a test on 100 bowl blanks. Fifty were endgrain coated
and air dried. Another fifty received no coating and were placed into
paper bags. Out of the 100 blanks, only 1 was cracked in any way. It was
a Mulberry platter that had a full thickness bark inclusion that ran
through 75% of the diameter. Oh, well no method is perfect ALL the time!

I normally do not coat any part of the bowl if I use the paper bag
method, but it cannot hurt. I am a production turner and I am interested
in getting the blanks to dry as quickly as possible with the least
amount of degrade. The paper bag method is cheaper and works just as
well as my traditional method. However, I tend to put up 50% of the
bowls in paper and the remaining 50% dry in the standard method with the
endgrain sealed on the wire racks. I hope this has been some help to
you. If you have any questions, feel free to email me.

Letting the chips fly...
Steve Russell
Eurowood Werks
The Woodlands, Texas

 
 
 

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Post by Neill Seige » Sat, 20 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

>  On my rough turned bowls, I coat the inside and outside of the
> endgrain only.

 Hi Steve,
what do you coat the end grain with? A local production turner told me he
thinks wax emulsion end sealers (Anchorseal, Sealtight 60)  sink into the wood
too much. He uses the cheapest paste wax he can find.
  Thanks
-Neill
 
 
 

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Post by Kevin Mille » Sat, 20 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Quote:


> >  On my rough turned bowls, I coat the inside and outside of the
> > endgrain only.

>  Hi Steve,
> what do you coat the end grain with? A local production turner told me he
> thinks wax emulsion end sealers (Anchorseal, Sealtight 60)  sink into the wood
> too much. He uses the cheapest paste wax he can find.
>   Thanks
> -Neill

I've never had that problem.  The emulsion only sinks in maybe a 32nd at
best.  I rough turn to about an inch diameter, and the bowl warps
enough that a significantly larger amount of wood is taken off in
the final turning.  Sounds like he just tells you that so as to keep
the competition to a minimum! ;-)

....Kevin
--
Kevin & Theresa Miller
http://www.alaska.net/~atftb

 
 
 

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Post by Rex Hasli » Sun, 21 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Do a search of the net using yahoo or the like looking for MobilCer M and
you will gety the nearest to you.

In New Zealand it is Mobil Oil

Rex



Quote:
> Who supplies it?


> > I use MobilCer M

> > Its a wax emulsion and is actually a horticultural dressing that is
applied
> > to pruning wounds.

> > Water soluable till the liquid dries when it sets as a wax layer, but
is
> > still porous enough to allow the wood to "breathe" at a regulated rate.

> > Excellent stuff and comparitively cheap

> > Rex Haslip
> > Auckland
> > New Zealand



> > > we have used***paint and more recently used paraffin wax to end
coat
> > > our wood
> > >  i prefer the wax, but have had trouble with it staying on. does
anyone
> > > have a home made recipe that is not as messy as the paint? thanks,
tim

 
 
 

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Post by Steve Russel » Sun, 21 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Hello Neill,

I use a product called Anchorseal. It is a typical was emulsion sealer.
I have never found that it sinks into the wood more than a tiny bit.
This is easily turned away when the bowl is remounted and trued up.

I almost never have a loss due to drying degrade anymore. It runs around
1% per year and I think that is about as good as you can get. There is
always the odd blank that refuses to become what our muse dictates.
Perhaps it is Mother Natures way of letting us know who is in charge.
:-) <VBG> Good luck to you mate and best of luck to you in your turning
endeavors!

Letting the chips fly...
Steve Russell
Eurowood Werks
The Woodlands, Texas

 
 
 

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Post by Jon Schillin » Sun, 21 Mar 1999 04:00:00


I know who the turner was that told Neill about absorbing the Anchor seal.
I respect him highly as a turner, but I don't have any evidence that the
sealer will be absorbed
in the end grain.   I've put sealer on maybe 30 different species and this
has never occurred in any of my
bowls.
Someone else asked about sealing inside and out.
My turning buddy (next door neighbor, our shops are 175 feet apart) does
indeed coat the insides.
I do not.   Never have.
Both of us have the same success.    Its rare to have our bowls crack and
split, except for cherry, plum
and wood where I have left in knots.    Howard Klepper emailed me with a tip
that I should use CA glue
when I leave knots in the wood.    I shall try it and I expect that it will
work just fine.
Steve Russell talks about using Anchor seal as well as just using paper
bags.
Both methods are successful for him.    I find it simpler and easier to just
coat these rough bowls
(I keep a lidded plastic bowl full of sealer.    I have cut a slot in the
lid and the paint brush is always
kept wet in the sealer.   When I have a bowl to seal, I remove the lid, take
the paintbrush and paint away, and close up the bowl)
I do nothing for up to a year.    The roughed out bowl sits on a shelf along
with many others.    Once
I feel they are about 14% moisture content, I take them to my heated
ba***t.    In 6 weeks or so

weeks ago.   I measured

My buddy Carl does pretty much the same thing, with moving the bowls into
his house to get them down
to 8%.   We live in the Northwest where we get some humidity and it works
for us.
Regards,
Jon Schilling
Quote:



>> >  On my rough turned bowls, I coat the inside and outside of the
>> > endgrain only.

>>  Hi Steve,
>> what do you coat the end grain with? A local production turner told me he
>> thinks wax emulsion end sealers (Anchorseal, Sealtight 60)  sink into the
wood
>> too much. He uses the cheapest paste wax he can find.
>>   Thanks
>> -Neill

>I've never had that problem.  The emulsion only sinks in maybe a 32nd at
>best.  I rough turn to about an inch diameter, and the bowl warps
>enough that a significantly larger amount of wood is taken off in
>the final turning.  Sounds like he just tells you that so as to keep
>the competition to a minimum! ;-)

>....Kevin
>--
>Kevin & Theresa Miller
>http://www.FoundCollection.com/~atftb