tool rest recommendation

tool rest recommendation

Post by Andrew Bars » Mon, 31 Jan 2000 04:00:00



I have a Jet minilathe, and recently was in Woodcraft.  They sell a
modular toolrest system, which consists of a sturdy piece of angle iron
with a hardened, polished steel rod welded to the top, and a
threaded hole tapped into the horizontal part of the L.  You get a shaft
in whatever diameter your lathe takes (5/8" in my case, 1" for bigger
lathes), and***the shaft onto the toolrest.

I'm delighted with mine.  It didn't come cheap -- the shaft was $9.99,
and the largest toolrest, at 12", was around $45, but it works like a
champ, and for people with two lathes, it provides an easy way to move
toolrests from one to the other.  I now have not only a really flat
toolrest (unlike the one that came with the lathe, which had worn
badly), but it's a full foot long, and great for spindles.

        -- Andrew Barss

 
 
 

tool rest recommendation

Post by Lyn J. Mangiamel » Tue, 01 Feb 2000 04:00:00


You're right, they're expensive, but the 12" works great on a Jet Mini.

Lyn

Quote:

> I have a Jet minilathe, and recently was in Woodcraft.  They sell a
> modular toolrest system, which consists of a sturdy piece of angle iron
> with a hardened, polished steel rod welded to the top, and a
> threaded hole tapped into the horizontal part of the L.  You get a shaft
> in whatever diameter your lathe takes (5/8" in my case, 1" for bigger
> lathes), and***the shaft onto the toolrest.

> I'm delighted with mine.  It didn't come cheap -- the shaft was $9.99,
> and the largest toolrest, at 12", was around $45, but it works like a
> champ, and for people with two lathes, it provides an easy way to move
> toolrests from one to the other.  I now have not only a really flat
> toolrest (unlike the one that came with the lathe, which had worn
> badly), but it's a full foot long, and great for spindles.

>         -- Andrew Barss


 
 
 

tool rest recommendation

Post by Andy Cohe » Tue, 01 Feb 2000 04:00:00


I've used the Woodriver toolrest for years.  I love it, but a word of
caution.  I WAS turning with my left hand holding the tool with index and
middle finger holding from under the tool.  My index finger sometimes
touching the inner side of the toolrest.  It is possible to get a catch
which will snag your finger up against the inner side and the ledge of the
toolrest.  First time it happened I saw stars.  I looked carefully at what
had happened and suspect that the flat ledge held my fingers there long
enough to get snaged while on a typical toolrest with a curved ledge my
fingers would have been pushed away.  I switched to a different toolrest.
Problem was the Woodriver rest is so smooth and I had to go back to it.  The
second time it happened 2 years later the index finger was broken.  Now I
turn with my wrist reversed so all fingers sit on the top of the tool and
the heel of the hand sits on the tool.  I still prefer the woodriver rest
though.  Too bad the ledge is perpendicular.  I spoke with the company about
it, but I don't think they will change it.  It is a superior toolrest, just
use with caution.  I would recommend never putting your fingers between the
tool and the ledge while turning at high RPM.
Quote:

>I have a Jet minilathe, and recently was in Woodcraft.  They sell a
>modular toolrest system, which consists of a sturdy piece of angle iron
>with a hardened, polished steel rod welded to the top, and a
>threaded hole tapped into the horizontal part of the L.  You get a shaft
>in whatever diameter your lathe takes (5/8" in my case, 1" for bigger
>lathes), and***the shaft onto the toolrest.

>I'm delighted with mine.  It didn't come cheap -- the shaft was $9.99,
>and the largest toolrest, at 12", was around $45, but it works like a
>champ, and for people with two lathes, it provides an easy way to move
>toolrests from one to the other.  I now have not only a really flat
>toolrest (unlike the one that came with the lathe, which had worn
>badly), but it's a full foot long, and great for spindles.

> -- Andrew Barss

 
 
 

tool rest recommendation

Post by Kevin K.Tic » Tue, 01 Feb 2000 04:00:00


It sounds like you have the "L" shape of the tool rest facing the work.
Why not turn the ledge or "L"shaped side towards you, thus eliminating the
chance of getting your finger between the work and the ledge?


Quote:
> I've used the Woodriver toolrest for years.  I love it, but a word of
> caution.  I WAS turning with my left hand holding the tool with index and
> middle finger holding from under the tool.  My index finger sometimes
> touching the inner side of the toolrest.  It is possible to get a catch
> which will snag your finger up against the inner side and the ledge of the
> toolrest.  First time it happened I saw stars.  I looked carefully at what
> had happened and suspect that the flat ledge held my fingers there long
> enough to get snaged while on a typical toolrest with a curved ledge my
> fingers would have been pushed away.  I switched to a different toolrest.
> Problem was the Woodriver rest is so smooth and I had to go back to it.
The
> second time it happened 2 years later the index finger was broken.  Now I
> turn with my wrist reversed so all fingers sit on the top of the tool and
> the heel of the hand sits on the tool.  I still prefer the woodriver rest
> though.  Too bad the ledge is perpendicular.  I spoke with the company
about
> it, but I don't think they will change it.  It is a superior toolrest,
just
> use with caution.  I would recommend never putting your fingers between
the
> tool and the ledge while turning at high RPM.


> >I have a Jet minilathe, and recently was in Woodcraft.  They sell a
> >modular toolrest system, which consists of a sturdy piece of angle iron
> >with a hardened, polished steel rod welded to the top, and a
> >threaded hole tapped into the horizontal part of the L.  You get a shaft
> >in whatever diameter your lathe takes (5/8" in my case, 1" for bigger
> >lathes), and***the shaft onto the toolrest.

> >I'm delighted with mine.  It didn't come cheap -- the shaft was $9.99,
> >and the largest toolrest, at 12", was around $45, but it works like a
> >champ, and for people with two lathes, it provides an easy way to move
> >toolrests from one to the other.  I now have not only a really flat
> >toolrest (unlike the one that came with the lathe, which had worn
> >badly), but it's a full foot long, and great for spindles.

> > -- Andrew Barss

 
 
 

tool rest recommendation

Post by andy » Tue, 01 Feb 2000 04:00:00


Yeah, I tried that when it first happened, but the lower part of the rest
hit up against the work.  Best approach since I really love the toolrest is
to only put the fingers underneath at low rpms otherwise I hold with the
heel of the hand... safer way to hold it anyway.  I've also gotten much
larger tools with longer handles (for the S750) and I've learned to control
the tip more from the back of the tool with the right hand like a pool cue
(thanks to the classes I had with Allan Batty).

I've got a number of toolrests two of which are the usual large scale
manufactured type.  The thin HARD smooth rod on the Woodriver is very
superior.  Tool motion is so much smoother and I've never had to file it
down like my other rests.  I'll probably buy another which is still cheaper
than having one custom made for me by my local welder.


Quote:
> It sounds like you have the "L" shape of the tool rest facing the work.
> Why not turn the ledge or "L"shaped side towards you, thus eliminating the
> chance of getting your finger between the work and the ledge?



> > I've used the Woodriver toolrest for years.  I love it, but a word of
> > caution.  I WAS turning with my left hand holding the tool with index
and
> > middle finger holding from under the tool.  My index finger sometimes
> > touching the inner side of the toolrest.  It is possible to get a catch
> > which will snag your finger up against the inner side and the ledge of
the
> > toolrest.  First time it happened I saw stars.  I looked carefully at
what
> > had happened and suspect that the flat ledge held my fingers there long
> > enough to get snaged while on a typical toolrest with a curved ledge my
> > fingers would have been pushed away.  I switched to a different
toolrest.
> > Problem was the Woodriver rest is so smooth and I had to go back to it.
> The
> > second time it happened 2 years later the index finger was broken.  Now
I
> > turn with my wrist reversed so all fingers sit on the top of the tool
and
> > the heel of the hand sits on the tool.  I still prefer the woodriver
rest
> > though.  Too bad the ledge is perpendicular.  I spoke with the company
> about
> > it, but I don't think they will change it.  It is a superior toolrest,
> just
> > use with caution.  I would recommend never putting your fingers between
> the
> > tool and the ledge while turning at high RPM.


> > >I have a Jet minilathe, and recently was in Woodcraft.  They sell a
> > >modular toolrest system, which consists of a sturdy piece of angle iron
> > >with a hardened, polished steel rod welded to the top, and a
> > >threaded hole tapped into the horizontal part of the L.  You get a
shaft
> > >in whatever diameter your lathe takes (5/8" in my case, 1" for bigger
> > >lathes), and***the shaft onto the toolrest.

> > >I'm delighted with mine.  It didn't come cheap -- the shaft was $9.99,
> > >and the largest toolrest, at 12", was around $45, but it works like a
> > >champ, and for people with two lathes, it provides an easy way to move
> > >toolrests from one to the other.  I now have not only a really flat
> > >toolrest (unlike the one that came with the lathe, which had worn
> > >badly), but it's a full foot long, and great for spindles.

> > > -- Andrew Barss

 
 
 

tool rest recommendation

Post by Howar » Wed, 02 Feb 2000 04:00:00


Andy:

I've seen you mention this before, and there's something I dont get.  A
catch pulls the cutting end of the tool down, and the handle up, with
the rest being the fulcrum.  So if your fingers were on the ledge, and
the ledge is away from the work, how did a catch push the side of the
tool that is away from the work down?

 
 
 

tool rest recommendation

Post by privrus » Wed, 02 Feb 2000 04:00:00


Be sure to bring a caliper when you go to Woodcraft to buy their tool
rest post.
My lathe requires a 1" post, and all of the 1" tool rest posts in the
local store,
and supposedly also in all other Woodcraft stores on the West coast, are
not quite 1" in diameter.  They were all 10-30 thousands too narrow.
The final
recommendation by the local Woodcraft store was to get a post made by a
machinist somewhere else.

--Bjarne
--
Free audio & video emails, greeting cards and forums
Talkway - http://www.talkway.com - Talk more ways (sm)

 
 
 

tool rest recommendation

Post by andy » Wed, 02 Feb 2000 04:00:00


heh I was waiting for someone to ask that.  Sure wish I had a good answer
for it!  The first time it happened the tool was towards the TS and I
couldn't figure it out.  Next time the tool hit a blob of CA filler which
bumped into where it got caught closer to the HS.  I tried real hard to
trace back how it happened.  The peice still had the deep cut in it and I
could get the tool to follow it, but I couldnt see how on Earth it happened.
One possibility was when the tool rotated at the catch and before the handle
could be shoved upwards I got caught.  It happened very fast.  Looking at
the shape of my finger I could see on one side where it pressed against the
toolrest ledge and the top which was crushed into the shape of the round
side of the gouge.  It was a mess.  Was it the toolrests fault? I don't
know, I do know I've had worse catches then these with my other rests and
never had it happen.  Still I love the toolrest which used to be referred to
as Woodriver.


Quote:
> Andy:

> I've seen you mention this before, and there's something I dont get.  A
> catch pulls the cutting end of the tool down, and the handle up, with
> the rest being the fulcrum.  So if your fingers were on the ledge, and
> the ledge is away from the work, how did a catch push the side of the
> tool that is away from the work down?

 
 
 

tool rest recommendation

Post by Howar » Thu, 03 Feb 2000 04:00:00


TS?  HS?  this is probably obvious, but I'm still on my first cup of
coffee.
 
 
 

tool rest recommendation

Post by Jack Hegset » Sat, 05 Feb 2000 04:00:00


Sorry, the original has scrolled off my message list.

Had a similiar problem (just a pinch though) with a tool rest made of angle
iron. Try this, cut a piece of triangular wood molding or even quarter-round
molding of appropriate cross section and length and glue it into the angle of
the rest to fill it in. Since the tool doesn't touch it (only your fingers)
hardness isn't required. It can be filed or sanded for any desired bevel.

Jack

 
 
 

tool rest recommendation

Post by Andy Cohe » Sat, 05 Feb 2000 04:00:00


No I KNOW that's a good idea cause I thought of it too !  ;-)  I'll try it.

Quote:


>Sorry, the original has scrolled off my message list.

>Had a similiar problem (just a pinch though) with a tool rest made of angle
>iron. Try this, cut a piece of triangular wood molding or even
quarter-round
>molding of appropriate cross section and length and glue it into the angle
of
>the rest to fill it in. Since the tool doesn't touch it (only your fingers)
>hardness isn't required. It can be filed or sanded for any desired bevel.

>Jack

 
 
 

tool rest recommendation

Post by walte » Mon, 03 Apr 2000 05:00:00


you may be able to get just what you are looking for at
bestwoodtools.com  I found a tool rest system there that really works
for me. It has interchangable tool posts and is 3/4" in diameter round
steel stock and I have found that all of my tools just glide along the
rest as a skate on ice. Because I have three lathes this come in handy.
Take care Walter

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tool rest recommendation

Post by walte » Tue, 18 Apr 2000 04:00:00


I found another place to get a good tool rest, bestwoodtools.com , they
can do some custom work also. But they do have a modular toolrest
system that is sthe best I have ever used. including the one you are
useing. I have one of them too. even working on the end of the 12" rest
their no vibration.  Walter

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tool rest recommendation

Post by walte » Tue, 18 Apr 2000 04:00:00


Sorry I posted to this two times I thought I was posting to a different
letter. I am new to computers and some timse get a little confused and
to what i am doing. As in turning practice will make me better at it.
Thank you for your patients  Walter

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