Another pen turning question.

Another pen turning question.

Post by sulphur » Wed, 01 Jan 2003 01:30:41



I was scouring the net as i do, and found some interesting things to turn
such as banksia seed pods.  I think that they would make beautiful pens, but
what do you guys/gals suggest filling the voids with, do you use an epoxy
mixture, or an acrylic resin, and where can we buy products like this.
Another question is on wood stabiliztation.  Is it possible to stabilize
wood myself.  I saw a webpage that said they would do acrylic stabilization
for 10.00 a pound, and this seems a little steep for me, any information
will be a help.

Brian

 
 
 

Another pen turning question.

Post by Bill Da » Wed, 01 Jan 2003 09:33:43




Quote:
>I was scouring the net as i do, and found some interesting things to turn
>such as banksia seed pods.  I think that they would make beautiful pens, but
>what do you guys/gals suggest filling the voids with, do you use an epoxy
>mixture, or an acrylic resin, and where can we buy products like this.
>Another question is on wood stabiliztation.  Is it possible to stabilize
>wood myself.  I saw a webpage that said they would do acrylic stabilization
>for 10.00 a pound, and this seems a little steep for me, any information
>will be a help.

>Brian

Banksia pens?...ummm....no, I don't think so. So many woods with solid
structure, I wouldn't look for something that involves that much trouble
just to make it usable You would encounter voids, layers of 'fuzz' and
odd, fragile 'woody'  parts.If you want some 'different' grain look, try
some palm...it is tricky enough
--
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Another pen turning question.

Post by sulphur » Wed, 01 Jan 2003 10:21:20


here is the webpage where i found a person who sells banksia pod pens
http://intellectease.com/ronspens/images/products/pens/Twist,%20Banks...
d%20Gold.jpg
it is the link to the picture

Brian

Quote:


> >I was scouring the net as i do, and found some interesting things to turn
> >such as banksia seed pods.  I think that they would make beautiful pens,
but
> >what do you guys/gals suggest filling the voids with, do you use an epoxy
> >mixture, or an acrylic resin, and where can we buy products like this.
> >Another question is on wood stabiliztation.  Is it possible to stabilize
> >wood myself.  I saw a webpage that said they would do acrylic
stabilization
> >for 10.00 a pound, and this seems a little steep for me, any information
> >will be a help.

> >Brian

> Banksia pens?...ummm....no, I don't think so. So many woods with solid
> structure, I wouldn't look for something that involves that much trouble
> just to make it usable You would encounter voids, layers of 'fuzz' and
> odd, fragile 'woody'  parts.If you want some 'different' grain look, try
> some palm...it is tricky enough
> --
> remove BALDERDASH for email reply

 
 
 

Another pen turning question.

Post by Leo Lichtma » Wed, 01 Jan 2003 10:33:08


things to turn(clip)
*************
When I started turning pens, I fell into a trap which you should avoid, in
the selection of wood.  Something which has beautiful grain, or attractive
features is very tempting, but you must visualize what it will look like
when cut down to pen size.  Grain which has a fine repetition pattern
works--widely spaced grain will not show up properly in the narrow piece
forming a pen barrel.  Neither will something like the seed pods you are
considering, quite apart from the structural difficulties you will have to
deal with.  Look at woods where a small sample of the grain will still show
you something.

 
 
 

Another pen turning question.

Post by Leo Lichtma » Wed, 01 Jan 2003 15:20:38


things to turn(clip)
 *************
considering, quite apart from the structural difficulties you will have to
deal with.
*************
Quote:
Leo, blushing, writes:  I looked at the site you gave, and I am clearly

wrong about seed pods.  (I might mention that the web address is so long,
that on my screen, it appears on two lines, so I could not use it as a link
without recopying it.  If you have trouble with it, that may be the reason.)
 
 
 

Another pen turning question.

Post by Larry Gottli » Wed, 01 Jan 2003 20:13:28


Hi: Don't assume that something can't be turned until you try it. An
example is posted on my website in the "new pens" section at the
beginning of the site.

I will post the identity of the "mystery plant" in a few days on this
thread.

Keep turning and enjoy.

Larry
Hand Turned Pens at http://pws.chartermi.net/~lgottlieb2/

 
 
 

Another pen turning question.

Post by Darrell Feltmat » Wed, 01 Jan 2003 21:56:10


Larry

You got me here. I must admit that the first thing that comes to mind is
corn cob, probably Indian corn from the color. Whatever, it does look
good.

God bless and safe turning and a good new year
Darrell Feltmate
Truro, NS, Canada

 
 
 

Another pen turning question.

Post by alan.. » Wed, 01 Jan 2003 23:01:17




Quote:
>here is the webpage where i found a person who sells banksia pod pens
>http://intellectease.com/ronspens/images/products/pens/Twist,%20Banks...
>d%20Gold.jpg
>it is the link to the picture

   That looks as if it has been filled with epoxy.   I just wonder
what the other side of the pen looks like.       The pod would need to
be cut to blank shape on a bandsaw then filled before turning, maybe
get 4 pens per pod.

   I went out into the bush with friends a while ago to get some woody
pear and also picked up a dozen or so banksia pods, they are drying in
my workshop now, and would not waste them on a pen.     Need
inspiration.

   I have a bowl on the lathe now, had great difficulty getting it
round, the freshly sharpened roughing gouge just bounced off, the wood
was so hard.    I think it is Jam, mainly used for fence posts, as jam
is rot resistant.   Will have to sand it to at least 800 grit to get
rid of scratches as there was no way I could get a smooth finish with
the chisel.     If it does not shatter, it will go to daughter-in-law
to stand on her Jarrah kitchen cabinets.
Alan
in beautiful Golden Bay, Western Oz,  South 32.25.42, East 115.45.44
        VK6 YAB     ICQ 6581610

 
 
 

Another pen turning question.

Post by Bill Da » Fri, 03 Jan 2003 00:40:00




Quote:
>here is the webpage where i found a person who sells banksia pod pens
>http://intellectease.com/ronspens/images/products/pens/Twist,%20Banks...
>d%20Gold.jpg
>it is the link to the picture

hmmm...interesting, but I sure wonder how much trouble he went to get
that.  (but I do see he has priced those as 'rare' and is charging
between $65 and $90 for them...pehaps at that price the extra hassle is
worth it!) His prices in general are a bit above what I usually see.

There's no law against trying something different, and if you want to
fill all those voids, more power to you!  But like Alan, I think I will
save Banksia pods for other things.
--
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Another pen turning question.

Post by Bill Da » Fri, 03 Jan 2003 01:02:27


On Wed, 01 Jan 2003 10:40:00 -0500, Bill Day

Quote:

> (but I do see he has priced those as 'rare' and is charging
>between $65 and $90 for them...pehaps at that price the extra hassle is
>worth it!) His prices in general are a bit above what I usually see.

adding to my own post: I just noticed that he lists " Bois d'arc" ,
usually known as Osage Orange, as a 'rare' wood.  I don't see anything
to show where he is from, but Osage is hardly 'rare'.

 ...and he has "Diospyros Embryopteris" listed...which may be rare, I'm
not sure...but it sure is an unusual one to have in such a list.  I
wonder why he only notes the Latin name? "Indian Persimmon"  seems to be
the usual common name. His pens seem to be well made *shrug*....There's
always someone with a different outlook.
--
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Another pen turning question.

Post by Larry Gottli » Fri, 03 Jan 2003 04:57:27


To all of you turners; Happy New Year.
The mystery plant that I put on my website is a corn cob. I have a bag
of dry corn (on the cob) for feeding squirrels. The thought came to me
to try and turn a cob into a pen. I have seen corncob pipes (General
Douglas Macarthur) and decided that the cob might work. With a lot of
CA glue I ended up with a hard glossy pen as seen on the website.

If you can turn it try it. What have you got to lose.

Larry
Hand Turned Pens at http://pws.chartermi.net/~lgottlieb2/