bandsaw blades

bandsaw blades

Post by Mike Leskowya » Sat, 09 Apr 2005 10:31:33



I am fairly new at turning, specifically large bowl.  I would like to use my
bandsaw to cut large rough blanks into circles to save time and tools.

Can anyone suggest a bandsaw blade size (width, teeth etc) for my 18" Jet
bandsaw that I can use that won't jam and cut a tighter radius.

Thanks

 
 
 

bandsaw blades

Post by SPA » Sat, 09 Apr 2005 10:48:28


Quote:

> I am fairly new at turning, specifically large bowl.  I would like to use my
> bandsaw to cut large rough blanks into circles to save time and tools.

> Can anyone suggest a bandsaw blade size (width, teeth etc) for my 18" Jet
> bandsaw that I can use that won't jam and cut a tighter radius.

> Thanks

For roughing out bowl blanks I suggest using a 3 TPI blade.  The width
of the blade would be determined by the radius of the blank you want.
Check out Suffolk Machinery's web site (or give them a call) for more
information.

http://www.suffolkmachinery.com/

--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA

(Remove -SPAM- to send email)

 
 
 

bandsaw blades

Post by Bill Rubenstei » Sat, 09 Apr 2005 12:14:54


3 tpi x 3/8 if you can find one.  3 tpi x 1/2 if you must.  You can't
cut real circles but you can get close enough by cutting tangents to the
circle.

A skip tooth would be nice also.  A small number of teeth offers many
advantages -- one of them is that they are real easy to resharpen with a
dremel tool.  You  can't do as good a job as factory but for our uses,
it doesn't matter.

Bill

Quote:


>> I am fairly new at turning, specifically large bowl.  I would like to
>> use my bandsaw to cut large rough blanks into circles to save time and
>> tools.

>> Can anyone suggest a bandsaw blade size (width, teeth etc) for my 18"
>> Jet bandsaw that I can use that won't jam and cut a tighter radius.

>> Thanks

> For roughing out bowl blanks I suggest using a 3 TPI blade.  The width
> of the blade would be determined by the radius of the blank you want.
> Check out Suffolk Machinery's web site (or give them a call) for more
> information.

> http://www.suffolkmachinery.com/

 
 
 

bandsaw blades

Post by Patriarc » Sat, 09 Apr 2005 14:03:08



Quote:
> 3 tpi x 3/8 if you can find one.  3 tpi x 1/2 if you must.  You can't
> cut real circles but you can get close enough by cutting tangents to the
> circle.

> A skip tooth would be nice also.  A small number of teeth offers many
> advantages -- one of them is that they are real easy to resharpen with a
> dremel tool.  You  can't do as good a job as factory but for our uses,
> it doesn't matter.

> Bill

A friend of mine in San Francisco resharpens his bandsaw blades with a
Dremel, and cuts veneers to 3/32, for use on his spendy furniture.  Takes
him less time to resharpen than it takes me to change to a fresh blade.

Start with a good quality blade, however.

Patriarch,
thinking it's really nice to have friends who know a lot more than he
does...

 
 
 

bandsaw blades

Post by Georg » Sat, 09 Apr 2005 19:32:22



Quote:
> I am fairly new at turning, specifically large bowl.  I would like to use
my
> bandsaw to cut large rough blanks into circles to save time and tools.

> Can anyone suggest a bandsaw blade size (width, teeth etc) for my 18" Jet
> bandsaw that I can use that won't jam and cut a tighter radius.

There's a lot to bandsawing that you'll want to  learn. The Suffolk site
will have information on the circle sizes for various blade widths, and a
bit on tooth patterns.  For green wood you'll want some set to the teeth for
dust clearing.   I use a 1/2" 3AS all the time, which will cut a down to 6"
diameter circle easily, though 5 is supposedly the limit.

I recommend you read the information on the site, and try to get ahold of
Duginskie's book for saw tuning and circle jig design.  The circle jig
allows you to cut a round shape with a straight blade as easily as that can
be accomplished.

NB - Wet wood is *** roller guides.  If you have them, pay special care
to their cleaning.  If you don't take a good look at ceramic as an option.

 
 
 

bandsaw blades

Post by Owen Low » Sun, 10 Apr 2005 00:18:57




Quote:
> NB - Wet wood is *** roller guides.  If you have them, pay special care
> to their cleaning.  If you don't take a good look at ceramic as an option.

Absolutely! I've got Carter guides on my saw (wish I knew how much green
wood I'd be t*** down or how much gunk can get packed onto the outer
roller surface cutting green wood when I opted for the factory upgrade
package).

First off, I set up my rollers so they're in light contact with the
blade. In other words, if you lightly touch the spinning roller while
the saw is running the roller easily stops. This may account for some
buildup that gets packed onto the blade and roller - or maybe has little
bearing (groan) on the matter.

Occasionally while cutting and certainly before shutting the saw down
for the day I try to make it a habit to clean the rollers and blade
body: While the saw is running I take a s***piece of wood and lightly
touch the roller surface and the blade behind the teeth to scrape off
the gunk. Sometimes I'll have to resort to using two s***pieces - one
to push the blade sideways slightly to drive the roller better while the
other cleans the surface.

I may get flamed for practicing and promoting what may be viewed as an
unsafe procedure, but I see little danger with the guides lowered to a
few inches from the table.

One of these days I'm going to have to rig up an internal blade
brush/scraper - but am not sure how much difference it'll make to
needing to perform my roller cleaning method.