Bandsaw Blades

Bandsaw Blades

Post by stogiepuf.. » Fri, 28 Jan 2005 07:12:36



Hello folks, Just ordered my new bandsaw and I need to get a few blades
for it (142 inch). I plan on a 1 1/2 incher for resawing, a 1/4 or 3/8
for curved stuff and a couple 1/2 or 3/4 inchers for prepping my
turning stuff. I say a couple for turning because that is mostly what I
use it for, that and resawing some of the same stuff for my wife's
scrollsaw habit :) Yeh, two of us in the shop at the same time, gotta
love it (makes it easier to get new tools too). As usual I want decent
quality but not at huge prices. Any suggestions?  Thanks a bunch,  Guy
 
 
 

Bandsaw Blades

Post by robo hipp » Fri, 28 Jan 2005 14:28:46


I've read a lot about bandsaw blades and don't remember most of it, I
am lucky to have a local industral supply place that will make me
anything I need. They ask me what type of cutting I plan to do, and
make the right blades.Perhaps there is a business locally that can do
that for you. Ask around.
  robo hippy

 
 
 

Bandsaw Blades

Post by Leif Thorvaldso » Fri, 28 Jan 2005 15:33:30


http://www.suffolkmachinery.com/

Terrific BS blades and service+advice

Leif

Quote:
> Hello folks, Just ordered my new bandsaw and I need to get a few blades
> for it (142 inch). I plan on a 1 1/2 incher for resawing, a 1/4 or 3/8
> for curved stuff and a couple 1/2 or 3/4 inchers for prepping my
> turning stuff. I say a couple for turning because that is mostly what I
> use it for, that and resawing some of the same stuff for my wife's
> scrollsaw habit :) Yeh, two of us in the shop at the same time, gotta
> love it (makes it easier to get new tools too). As usual I want decent
> quality but not at huge prices. Any suggestions?  Thanks a bunch,  Guy

 
 
 

Bandsaw Blades

Post by Owen Low » Fri, 28 Jan 2005 17:57:26




Quote:
> http://www.suffolkmachinery.com/

> Terrific BS blades and service+advice

I agree. Their "AS" series is really good for sawing up green wood. As a
matter of fact I just received an order of (2) 3/8"x3 tooth AS blades,
which serves as my main blade, plus a 1/4" x 6 tooth for some bone I'm
looking to cut. They are (or at least were last week) running a promo
that if you buy 3 blades you get another free. Had them send a third
3/8" AS - but in hindsight should have probably had them send something
pretty fine toothed just to have on hand for the bone incase the 6 tooth
is too coarse. I've also used their 3/4" x 3 (or 4) tooth for resawing
dry stock and it has been quite satisfactory. They ship within a day or
two of your order, sent priority mail and you get it 2 or 3 days after
that.

--
"Sure we'll have fascism in America, but it'll come disguised
as 100% Americanism."   --  Huey P. Long

 
 
 

Bandsaw Blades

Post by Arc » Sat, 29 Jan 2005 00:36:25


Hi Owen,  My interest in your use of bone comes disguised as 100%
curiosity. :)

I think there may be others like me, who know very little about bone as
a turning material and would like to learn a little about it, whether or
not we ever use it. (I did not say "bone up" or "bonehead". That would
have stunk up the ng worse than scorched bone. Arrggh, isn't there
always one like me in every ng?  

Anyway, how about you starting a thread with details on the whats, hows,
whys etc. you incorporate this material in your turnings. I hope that
others who have used bone will enlighten us also. TIA for considering.

Turn to Safety,  Arch                        
                                                  Fortiter

http://community.webtv.net/almcc/MacsMusings

 
 
 

Bandsaw Blades

Post by Owen Low » Sat, 29 Jan 2005 15:10:58



Quote:

> Hi Owen,  My interest in your use of bone comes disguised as 100%
> curiosity. :)

> I think there may be others like me, who know very little about bone as
> a turning material and would like to learn a little about it, whether or
> not we ever use it. (I did not say "bone up" or "bonehead". That would
> have stunk up the ng worse than scorched bone. Arrggh, isn't there
> always one like me in every ng?  

> Anyway, how about you starting a thread with details on the whats, hows,
> whys etc. you incorporate this material in your turnings. I hope that
> others who have used bone will enlighten us also. TIA for considering.

Hi Arch. I'd love to start a thread on turning bone and incorporating
bone into turnings... once I've turned some bone. ;)

Never tried the stuff and have only seen it done on one Bonnie Klein's
videos. I'm considering not only turning some for an insert into another
piece, but also attempting my hand at carving some to serve as
complimentary design elements on the same turnings.

I've got to get this stuff done by the first of March for a show I hope
to be admitted to for this summer. I'll repost as things progress or I
learn that round is the only shape for me.

--
"Sure we'll have fascism in America, but it'll come disguised
as 100% Americanism."   --  Huey P. Long

 
 
 

Bandsaw Blades

Post by Darrell Feltmat » Sat, 29 Jan 2005 22:41:14


Owen
When turning bone or antler, have an open window and wear a mask. A good
mask and maybe one of those constant air moving air fresheners. It reminds
me of a slaughterhouse or maybe burning hair (I used to fight forest fires).
Bone is often easy to obtain at the pet store, already cleaned and ready to
use. The dust is miserable on your lungs. The flip side is that bone can be
carved to beauty, engraved and colored as in skrimshaw and that antler has
gorgeous color variations. Some areas can be very spongy but harden well
with CA.

--
God bless and safe turning
Darrell Feltmate
Truro, NS Canada
www.aroundthewoods.com

 
 
 

Bandsaw Blades

Post by Arc » Sat, 29 Jan 2005 23:49:52


Owen, Thanks for your reply to a confused query. :)  I expect that you
will be admitted to the show and wish you much success.

Darrell, Thanks for picking up. Could you expand a bit, with your
special ability to craft and teach?   What bones? beef leg?  Boil? Dye?
Bend ?  Cut?  Scrape?  Pics?  No antlers here, altho too many deer. I
haven't hunted since I married a present day St. Francis, 55+ years ago.
(:

Turn to Safety,  Arch                        
                                                  Fortiter

http://community.webtv.net/almcc/MacsMusings

 
 
 

Bandsaw Blades

Post by Lobby Dosse » Sun, 30 Jan 2005 03:28:34


Quote:

> Owen
> When turning bone or antler, have an open window and wear a mask. A
> good mask and maybe one of those constant air moving air fresheners.
> It reminds me of a slaughterhouse or maybe burning hair (I used to
> fight forest fires). Bone is often easy to obtain at the pet store,
> already cleaned and ready to use. The dust is miserable on your lungs.
> The flip side is that bone can be carved to beauty, engraved and
> colored as in skrimshaw and that antler has gorgeous color variations.
> Some areas can be very spongy but harden well with CA.

IIRC, antler is hair. Which is why it would smell like burning hair.

And bone, well ... 'Dem bones, dem bones, dem dry bones ...'.

Perhaps a job for LDD?

 
 
 

Bandsaw Blades

Post by Darrell Feltmat » Sun, 30 Jan 2005 04:50:15


Arch
I have used beef bone for guitar parts, especially nuts and bridges. It
works well as in cutting and sanding and will dye with leather dyes. I will
take engraving very well although I would recommend an engravers bench and a
set of gravers for it. Skrimshaw is often done on bone with the point of a
knife in the manner of old sailors who used whatever was handy to pass some
long nights at sea. A lot of the time the bone in the pet store is already
boiled and cleaned so as to be ready for shipping and storing as well as for
a turner to use. Otherwise it can be boiled for ages and then cleaned of all
tissure residue and dried for use. It cuts with standard tools and files and
sandpaper work for fine tuning an inlay fit.

Antler is bone except for some varieties of antelope, I believe. On the
other hand I am ready to stand corrected. Sta Francis would approve of the
use of most antler because it is a renewable resource. Deer drop them every
year. If you happen to be near to a dear farm it is easy to pick up a rack
or two for little money. A pair of antler pens bought my last.

I will see about getting the time to do some bone. I have not done any for a
while and there are a few things on the plate at the moment. A friend
brought in a $3,000.00 Larrivee guitar with a cracked side and I am getting
up the nerve to fix it. Maybe the one with the broken neck first? i have to
make some special clamps for each job so one of these days I need the time
to do them.

--
God bless and safe turning
Darrell Feltmate
Truro, NS Canada
www.aroundthewoods.com

 
 
 

Bandsaw Blades

Post by Georg » Sun, 30 Jan 2005 05:47:51



Quote:

> > Owen
> > When turning bone or antler, have an open window and wear a mask. A
> > good mask and maybe one of those constant air moving air fresheners.
> > It reminds me of a slaughterhouse or maybe burning hair (I used to
> > fight forest fires). Bone is often easy to obtain at the pet store,
> > already cleaned and ready to use. The dust is miserable on your lungs.
> > The flip side is that bone can be carved to beauty, engraved and
> > colored as in skrimshaw and that antler has gorgeous color variations.
> > Some areas can be very spongy but harden well with CA.

> IIRC, antler is hair. Which is why it would smell like burning hair.

> And bone, well ... 'Dem bones, dem bones, dem dry bones ...'.

> Perhaps a job for LDD?

Well, bone in the deciduous varieties.  Horns are cuticle - like your
fingernails.

Are you sure you old guys are looking for antlers to turn?

http://www.velvita.com/sb.htm

 
 
 

Bandsaw Blades

Post by Owen Low » Sun, 30 Jan 2005 06:56:59




Quote:
> When turning bone or antler, have an open window and wear a mask. A good
> mask and maybe one of those constant air moving air fresheners. It reminds
> me of a slaughterhouse or maybe burning hair (I used to fight forest fires).
> Bone is often easy to obtain at the pet store, already cleaned and ready to
> use. The dust is miserable on your lungs. The flip side is that bone can be
> carved to beauty, engraved and colored as in skrimshaw and that antler has
> gorgeous color variations. Some areas can be very spongy but harden well
> with CA.

Hi Darrell. Yes, I picked up my bone pieces at the pet store. Last
evening I put on a 10 tooth blade on my bandsaw and cut off a few
sections to experiment with. First, the 10 tooth might have been a touch
too fine as the bone turns to fine dust instead of chips as wood does (I
think it was filling the tooth gullets.) It smelled just like the last
time I was sitting in the dentist's chair with both of his hands plus
both of the assistant's hands drilling away in my mouth for a filling
replacement.

I superglued a small block onto a s***piece and started turning it
just to play around and see it's characteristics. First, it is very hard
stuff - much harder than any wood I've cut. And, it doesn't really "cut"
as wood does - on the lathe it turns to dust too. Very fine and
talc-like.

I only got as far as truing the outside to round and hollowing the
inside to round. It had a very smooth surface right off the tool and
even a bit of polish. Now if I can only find some 1.5"x4" piece of solid
bone someplace. ;)

--
"Sure we'll have fascism in America, but it'll come disguised
as 100% Americanism."   --  Huey P. Long

 
 
 

Bandsaw Blades

Post by Harry B. Py » Sun, 30 Jan 2005 13:21:47


Owen,

Quote:
> I superglued a small block onto a s***piece and started turning it
> just to play around and see it's characteristics. First, it is very hard
> stuff - much harder than any wood I've cut. And, it doesn't really "cut"
> as wood does - on the lathe it turns to dust too. Very fine and
> talc-like.

You may want to try Tagua nut too. I thought it would be soft like the nuts
that you eat. It is really hard and very strong. I CA glued one to a block
and turned a tenon on it. Reversed it an put the tenon in my chuck. With a
sharp skew, you get little fine threads of material but with gouges the
material is removed as chips. But it sands and buffs to a beautiful shine.
Really looks like ivory. This stuff can be carved as well as turned.
 
 
 

Bandsaw Blades

Post by Bob Beckwit » Mon, 31 Jan 2005 13:34:53


I am told by a friend who repairs guitars and other musical
instruments that Moose bone is excellent for nuts and bridges.

On Fri, 28 Jan 2005 19:50:15 GMT, "Darrell Feltmate"

Quote:

>Arch
>I have used beef bone for guitar parts, especially nuts and bridges. It
>works well as in cutting and sanding and will dye with leather dyes. I will
>take engraving very well although I would recommend an engravers bench and a
>set of gravers for it. Skrimshaw is often done on bone with the point of a
>knife in the manner of old sailors who used whatever was handy to pass some
>long nights at sea. A lot of the time the bone in the pet store is already
>boiled and cleaned so as to be ready for shipping and storing as well as for
>a turner to use. Otherwise it can be boiled for ages and then cleaned of all
>tissure residue and dried for use. It cuts with standard tools and files and
>sandpaper work for fine tuning an inlay fit.

>Antler is bone except for some varieties of antelope, I believe. On the
>other hand I am ready to stand corrected. Sta Francis would approve of the
>use of most antler because it is a renewable resource. Deer drop them every
>year. If you happen to be near to a dear farm it is easy to pick up a rack
>or two for little money. A pair of antler pens bought my last.

>I will see about getting the time to do some bone. I have not done any for a
>while and there are a few things on the plate at the moment. A friend
>brought in a $3,000.00 Larrivee guitar with a cracked side and I am getting
>up the nerve to fix it. Maybe the one with the broken neck first? i have to
>make some special clamps for each job so one of these days I need the time
>to do them.

 
 
 

Bandsaw Blades

Post by Owen Low » Thu, 03 Feb 2005 18:05:45




Quote:
> You may want to try Tagua nut too. I thought it would be soft like the nuts
> that you eat. It is really hard and very strong. I CA glued one to a block
> and turned a tenon on it. Reversed it an put the tenon in my chuck. With a
> sharp skew, you get little fine threads of material but with gouges the
> material is removed as chips. But it sands and buffs to a beautiful shine.
> Really looks like ivory. This stuff can be carved as well as turned.

Thanks Harry for the recommendation. The unpredictable void in the
center may be a problem. I'm needing to make rings that are 1.125"
outside diameter and .875" inside. The bone can be examined before
purchasing or turning to determine if enough material is present. I also
wanted the whitish, ivory look but adhere to non-manmade material so
didn't consider alternate ivory.

--
"Sure we'll have fascism in America, but it'll come disguised
as 100% Americanism."   --  Huey P. Long