Stronghold vs. SuperNova advice please.

Stronghold vs. SuperNova advice please.

Post by Rusty Lloy » Sat, 11 Dec 1999 04:00:00



I don't have any experience with the referenced chucks, but I do strongly
recommend a look-see at the Vicmarc.  I have this chuck and love it.  It has
an allen wrench for a key (if you loose it, it can be replaced where ever
you buy allen wrenches).  Sealed gear mechanism, which means no dust
clogging up the gears, and it has super holding power.  BTW, it is machined
to machinist tolerances.

RUSTY


Quote:
> I am considering ordering either the Oneway Stronghold or the
> SuperNova chuck and would appreciate some advice.
> I have an older standard Nova chuck and was debating buying additional
> jaws for it or upgrading to a gear chuck.
> I only have the standard jaw set that came with the Nova now.
> I recently bought a Nova 3000 lathe and would like to turn bowls up to
> around 12-14" in diameter.
> How much better are the gear chucks?  Are there any real differences
> between the Supernova and the Stronghold?
> What jaws have proven to be the most useful?

> Thanks for any comments,

> Remove "nospam" from address to respond.

 
 
 

Stronghold vs. SuperNova advice please.

Post by Thomas Trag » Sat, 11 Dec 1999 04:00:00


The Oneway Stronghold is the better chuck.  I've used both, and I can
definitely feel a marked difference in the mechanisms.  

You'll find the Stronghold a top-notch piece of equipment.

By the way, they have a new mini-stronhold, called the "Talon" out
now.  Pretty much sized for smaller lathes, it's about 2/3 the size of
the bigger one.  I had a chance to play with one at the AAW show the
other month, that this little baby feels like a Swiss Watch movement
when you use the key on it.



Quote:
>I am considering ordering either the Oneway Stronghold or the
>SuperNova chuck and would appreciate some advice.
>I have an older standard Nova chuck and was debating buying additional
>jaws for it or upgrading to a gear chuck.
>I only have the standard jaw set that came with the Nova now.
>I recently bought a Nova 3000 lathe and would like to turn bowls up to
>around 12-14" in diameter.
>How much better are the gear chucks?  Are there any real differences
>between the Supernova and the Stronghold?
>What jaws have proven to be the most useful?

>Thanks for any comments,

>Remove "nospam" from address to respond.


 
 
 

Stronghold vs. SuperNova advice please.

Post by Jon Schillin » Sat, 11 Dec 1999 04:00:00


Charlie,
Depending in your budget...  If it is unlimited the Oneway Stronghold is a
great chuck.    Others would recommend the Vicmark and its great also.
If you are justifying each purchase, you can buy NEW jaws for your Nova....
These jaws are the same as the Oneway Stronghold jaws with the grooves on
the inside of the gripping lip.   You can get them for about $35 each set.
I still use 3 Nova chucks as well as a Oneway Stronghold.
If you are on a limited budget but just have to buy a new chuck the Super
Nova works fine, but the others mentioned are better.
You have not mentioned what you turn and what you want to begin
turning....that can make a huge difference.
If you anticipate turning 18" dia bowls and platters you will be stretching
the limits of the Nova a bit.   The Stronghold, just as the name implies,
has a stronger grip on large heavy items.
Good luck,
--
Jon Schilling
Ridgefield, Wa  USA   (10 miles north of Portland, Ore)

Quote:
> I am considering ordering either the Oneway Stronghold or the
> SuperNova chuck and would appreciate some advice.
> I have an older standard Nova chuck and was debating buying additional
> jaws for it or upgrading to a gear chuck.
> I only have the standard jaw set that came with the Nova now.
> I recently bought a Nova 3000 lathe and would like to turn bowls up to
> around 12-14" in diameter.
> How much better are the gear chucks?  Are there any real differences
> between the Supernova and the Stronghold?
> What jaws have proven to be the most useful?

> Thanks for any comments,

> Remove "nospam" from address to respond.

 
 
 

Stronghold vs. SuperNova advice please.

Post by Kevin & Theresa Mille » Sat, 11 Dec 1999 04:00:00


Quote:


> > How much better are the gear chucks?

> All the demos I have seen where a chuck requiring 2 levers is used
> the user usually goes medieval on the levers to make sure he gets a
> good grip on the piece (especially when the levers are quite short).
> I have a supernova and it is very easy for me crush the piece if I put
> too much pressure on the key. That tells me that it is much easier to
> get a strong grip with a gear chuck than with a scroll chuck.

> On the Supernova: I like mine although I don't care much for the key. With
> the articulated tip it feels fragile and it is sometimes a bit hard to find
> the right position for the ket to grip. Mine also has a little play
> in one of the jaw.
> If I was in the market again I would definitely look into that smaller
> version of the Stronghold that people have been talking about recently.
> (I have a minilathe so the Stronghold is overkill.)

> bruno.

I've seen that too Bruno, but I've always thought it was maybe just
some theatrics on the demonstrator's part.  I have a Oneway 4-jaw with
the tommy bars, and I give it a good snuggin' but I don't come close to
reefing on the sucker like some of these guys to.  I find it quite easy
to crush the fibers too but if I use a little discretion and don't
tighten too hard I've no problem.  I believe the keyed chucks do have
a more robust tightening ratio, but there's no reason to honk on the
bars the way some folks seem to want to do.

There is a difference in the way Stronghold jaws hold and the Nova
jaws.  With the Nova, one has to get the tenon close to the optimal
diameter for a given set of jaws, to insure maximum wood to metal
contact.
Because of their shape, the Oneway jaws grip better over a wider range.
At least that's the sales pitch, and in my experience it's borne out...

...Kevin
--
Kevin & Theresa Miller
http://www.alaska.net/~atftb

 
 
 

Stronghold vs. SuperNova advice please.

Post by Jon Schillin » Sun, 12 Dec 1999 04:00:00


There is a chucking situation where I can not use the Stronghold chuck
because of the key design.
Most of the time, when I get ready to "finish turn" a rough turned bowl, I
will chuck the bowl by the tenon on the bottom and after I get it situated
on the chuck so that I can get a round bowl with sufficient wall thickness,
I turn a short 2.5" dia tenon on the inside of the bowl.
I rechuck on the new tenon and turn the outside of the bowl down to the orig
tenon and I clean up that original tenon on the bottom and make it perfectly
round again.
I do this because I learned how to make my outside shapes this way.   (I can
turn the outside shape with the bottom tenon being in the chuck at the
headstock, but I like it as I described)
Why can't you use the Stronghold chuck, you ask?
If the bowl is shallow and if the rim does not cover the keyhole, I can do
so.
But, if the bowl is deep enough that the rim covers the keyhole, I am out of
luck.
With the chucks that use tommy bars if the rim gets in the way, I use a
'right angle' allen wrench to tighten the chuck.
If the rim diameter is too small and there is no clearance, I just grin and
put the outside bottom tenon in the chuck and turn it....
And, as Kevin states, the tommy bars have never let me down because of
insufficient tightening power.
I have a 28" diameter bowl that I turned with my Nova Chuck.   It did not
come loose nor did I perceive that it might, and I checked it often.
AND, if you did a time study with a production turner, you might find "just
how much faster" using the tommy can be contrasted to the chuck that
requires a key to close the jaws.
This was pointed out to me in 1997 in Provo by Richard Raffan, no less, when
I was ogling the various chucks at the Craft Supplies showroom.
I like my Stronghold chuck and I like my Nova Chucks too.
Regards,

--
Jon Schilling
Ridgefield, Wa  USA   (10 miles north of Portland, Ore)


Quote:


> > > How much better are the gear chucks?

> > All the demos I have seen where a chuck requiring 2 levers is used
> > the user usually goes medieval on the levers to make sure he gets a
> > good grip on the piece (especially when the levers are quite short).
> > I have a supernova and it is very easy for me crush the piece if I put
> > too much pressure on the key. That tells me that it is much easier to
> > get a strong grip with a gear chuck than with a scroll chuck.

> > On the Supernova: I like mine although I don't care much for the key.
With
> > the articulated tip it feels fragile and it is sometimes a bit hard to
find
> > the right position for the ket to grip. Mine also has a little play
> > in one of the jaw.
> > If I was in the market again I would definitely look into that smaller
> > version of the Stronghold that people have been talking about recently.
> > (I have a minilathe so the Stronghold is overkill.)

> > bruno.

> I've seen that too Bruno, but I've always thought it was maybe just
> some theatrics on the demonstrator's part.  I have a Oneway 4-jaw with
> the tommy bars, and I give it a good snuggin' but I don't come close to
> reefing on the sucker like some of these guys to.  I find it quite easy
> to crush the fibers too but if I use a little discretion and don't
> tighten too hard I've no problem.  I believe the keyed chucks do have
> a more robust tightening ratio, but there's no reason to honk on the
> bars the way some folks seem to want to do.

> There is a difference in the way Stronghold jaws hold and the Nova
> jaws.  With the Nova, one has to get the tenon close to the optimal
> diameter for a given set of jaws, to insure maximum wood to metal
> contact.
> Because of their shape, the Oneway jaws grip better over a wider range.
> At least that's the sales pitch, and in my experience it's borne out...

> ...Kevin
> --
> Kevin & Theresa Miller
> http://www.alaska.net/~atftb

 
 
 

Stronghold vs. SuperNova advice please.

Post by rangerd.. » Sun, 12 Dec 1999 04:00:00




Quote:
> There is a chucking situation where I can not use the Stronghold chuck
> because of the key design.
> Most of the time, when I get ready to "finish turn" a rough turned
bowl, I
> will chuck the bowl by the tenon on the bottom and after I get it
situated
> on the chuck so that I can get a round bowl with sufficient wall
thickness,
> I turn a short 2.5" dia tenon on the inside of the bowl.

(BIG snip)

Every day I'm thankful for my early training where I was taught to
handle virtually every turning circumstance without the aid of a chuck.
And, having said that, I love my Stronghold's. (I have three. And, I
look forward to the arrival of my Talon chuck for the Jet.) I don't
ever include any portion of the tenon on the bottom of a finished bowl
so I don't care that the jaws crush the fibers. I want them to hold the
piece and if crushing is required, so be it. I guess my biggest
question about turning a tenon inside the bowl would be "why?"
Reversing the bowl against a "jam" chuck and a live center in the
center of the out-of-round-tenon (in order to true the tenon) seems
like a time saver to me. Just my humble opinion, however.
Ranger***

Sent via Deja.com http://www.FoundCollection.com/
Before you buy.

 
 
 

Stronghold vs. SuperNova advice please.

Post by Jon Schillin » Mon, 13 Dec 1999 04:00:00


Ranger*** and all....
I tried to 'splain' that I prefer to turn and finish the outside of the bowl
with the bottom of the bowl towards the tailstock........I turn the tenon on
the inside of the bowl and then by reversing the bowl I can do so.
I guess I found this method easier for me than "Learning and becoming
comfortable with" finishing the outside of the bowl with the bottom towards
the headstock...
And I, too, believe that all turners should be well grounded in the
beginning by learning how to turn without using a chuck.  Being comfortable
turning without using a chuck enables one to immediately know how to handle
difficult turning situations, such as desiring to turn a thin slab of wood
into a finished piece.   Knowing how to use a glue block and being
comfortable with it can be used many times.
Also, using a faceplate large enough in diameter, when necessary, allows for
turning away the***holes later.
I aim to reduce the need to use fixtures and jam chucks for turning off the
bottoms by buying a vacuum chucking system from Nichols Enterprises, of the
Nichols bowl lathe fame.  The pump he sells is ovesized and will meet all my
expected needs.    BTW, the pump is powered by a 3/4 hp motor.
Regards and hope the above explains why I put a tenon on the inside of a
bowl, (or, Platter)

--
Jon Schilling
Ridgefield, Wa  USA   (10 miles north of Portland, Ore)

Quote:


> > There is a chucking situation where I can not use the Stronghold chuck
> > because of the key design.
> > Most of the time, when I get ready to "finish turn" a rough turned
> bowl, I
> > will chuck the bowl by the tenon on the bottom and after I get it
> situated
> > on the chuck so that I can get a round bowl with sufficient wall
> thickness,
> > I turn a short 2.5" dia tenon on the inside of the bowl.
> (BIG snip)

> Every day I'm thankful for my early training where I was taught to
> handle virtually every turning circumstance without the aid of a chuck.
> And, having said that, I love my Stronghold's. (I have three. And, I
> look forward to the arrival of my Talon chuck for the Jet.) I don't
> ever include any portion of the tenon on the bottom of a finished bowl
> so I don't care that the jaws crush the fibers. I want them to hold the
> piece and if crushing is required, so be it. I guess my biggest
> question about turning a tenon inside the bowl would be "why?"
> Reversing the bowl against a "jam" chuck and a live center in the
> center of the out-of-round-tenon (in order to true the tenon) seems
> like a time saver to me. Just my humble opinion, however.
> Ranger***

> Sent via Deja.com http://www.FoundCollection.com/
> Before you buy.

 
 
 

Stronghold vs. SuperNova advice please.

Post by rangerd.. » Tue, 14 Dec 1999 04:00:00




Quote:
> Ranger*** and all....
> I tried to 'splain' that I prefer to turn and finish the outside of
the bowl
> with the bottom of the bowl towards the tailstock........I turn the
tenon on
> the inside of the bowl and then by reversing the bowl I can do so.>
> (Big snip...)

Hi, Jon!

Maybe I'm just dense but, what I'm failing to understand is this;
If you turn the tenon inside the bowl, are you turning it before or
after it's dried? If before, doesn't it warp pretty much the same as a
tenon turned on the bottom? (Leading to holding a warped tenon in a
chuck.) If you turn the tenon when doing the final shaping, how are you
holding the bowl? (By the warped tenon on the bottom?) Using a jam
chuck, you could true the tenon on the bottom, mount the trued tenon in
the chuck and happily shape the inside of the bowl without
interruption. Then, reverse the bowl against the jam chuck (or vacuum
chuck!) and shape the outside and finish off the bottom with the aid of
a short point live cup center. When using the vacuum chuck, you will
have to true up something first; either the inside or outside or the
chuck won't hold anything for you. Figure in the inability to use the
chuck key with the tenon inside the bowl and I don't see how it adds up
to be a good way to do it. I'm not claiming that your method is wrong.
It's only that IMHO I think there is an easier way. We all know that
for ten turners there are ten ways to do the same task. ;-)
Ranger***

Sent via Deja.com http://www.FoundCollection.com/
Before you buy.

 
 
 

Stronghold vs. SuperNova advice please.

Post by Siegfrie » Tue, 14 Dec 1999 04:00:00


I have a Supernova chuck and experienced the same problems with the key. So
I just epoxied the head to the shaft and it made a world of difference. I
have never missed the articulation feature.

Siegfried


Quote:

> > How much better are the gear chucks?

> All the demos I have seen where a chuck requiring 2 levers is used
> the user usually goes medieval on the levers to make sure he gets a
> good grip on the piece (especially when the levers are quite short).
> I have a supernova and it is very easy for me crush the piece if I put
> too much pressure on the key. That tells me that it is much easier to
> get a strong grip with a gear chuck than with a scroll chuck.

> On the Supernova: I like mine although I don't care much for the key. With
> the articulated tip it feels fragile and it is sometimes a bit hard to
find
> the right position for the ket to grip. Mine also has a little play
> in one of the jaw.
> If I was in the market again I would definitely look into that smaller
> version of the Stronghold that people have been talking about recently.
> (I have a minilathe so the Stronghold is overkill.)

> bruno.

 
 
 

Stronghold vs. SuperNova advice please.

Post by Howard Kleppe » Tue, 14 Dec 1999 04:00:00


I do not rough turn a lot; too much an instant gratification kind of
guy.  But when I do get around to finishing a rough bowl, I've learned
to do the inside and outside on one fixing.  I understand that Jon is
more comfortable doing the outside first with the bowl bottom towards
the tailstock.  Of course there is no right and wrong way to work here.

The point I would like to make is that for me the key to doing both
sides on one fixing has been learning to reverse my hands on the tool,
and turn with my right hand by the toolrest and my left on the handle.
I think this is a very worthwhile skill to develop, because it is
valuable any time you are turning a curve that goes from a smaller
diameter on the left to a larger one on the right and you want to make a
pulling cut.  It does not take so long to get comfortable reversing
hands; it is very well worth the investment.