I need some advice please

I need some advice please

Post by Stev » Thu, 17 Sep 1998 04:00:00



Hello,
I am thinking of turning my hobby of woodworking into a small part time
business hoping for it to someday go full time. I have some great plans
for planters, step stools, cradles, shelves and so on... When I create
an item I make it as if it was a piece of fine furniture. I don't make
it fast I do put in a lot of care in doing it well. I would like to know
if anyone out there thinks there is a need for a business like this. Do
you think high end wood working crafts would sell for greater money than
the cheep thrown together pine furniture we all see in the unfinished
furniture store? I will do most of my projects out of oak, cherry ect.

Thanks for your time
Steve

 
 
 

I need some advice please

Post by Love Chil » Fri, 18 Sep 1998 04:00:00


I would say it depends on your market.  West coast and East coast do well it
goes down the further inland you go. This is a generality of course. And I
know a few High end woodworkers who make a descent living. But I know more
who've paid their dues and been disappointed with their business. I would
advise cultivating your client base, give them what they ask for in a
reasonable time, don't take on more than you can do, and if they are
satisfied ask them to recommend you.
L.C.

 
 
 

I need some advice please

Post by Alexturn » Fri, 18 Sep 1998 04:00:00


Steve,

This is what I wanted to do most all my life, and was finally able to do it a
couple of years ago, but only by retiring with an independant income. It's
really tough to make a living at woodworking, because so many people are
willing to do it for nothing.

The only way I have seen that you can do it is to find a special niche market,
and specialize in that. Something like home entertainment system cabinets or
commercial restaurant interiors. Unfortunately the projects you mention are
being imported from Asia and sold in discount stores for less than you can by
the wood for. And no, most people don't know or care about the quality, they
just see price.

Something to do is to go around to craft shows and look at what others are
making and selling. Most people on the circuit make cheap "country" items, and
they sell well. But if you investigate you will find it takes a lot of hours,
and you earn close to minimum wage.

You can check out some high end galleries and find some beautiful work at
decent prices. But if you check back in 6 months you  will find the same items
still sitting there waiting for a buyer.

I don't mean to throw cold water on your dreams, but if it was easy and
profitable there would be about 50 million professional woodworkers in this
country.

John Alexander

Quote:
>Hello,
>I am thinking of turning my hobby of woodworking into a small part time

business hoping for it to someday go full time. I have some great plans for
planters, step stools, cradles, shelves and so on...
 
 
 

I need some advice please

Post by Charles Andr » Sat, 19 Sep 1998 04:00:00


Alex,

Here are three good books you will probably find helpful: Profitable
Woodworking by Martin Edic;  The Woodworker's  Marketing Guide by Martin
Edic;  and  The Woodworkers Guide to Pricing Your Work by Dan Ramsey.  I
found  the Marketing Guide especially useful.  I repair and refinish all
kinds of furniture and generally stay very busy.  In addition to your skill
as a woodworker, marketing will be your salvation.  Hope this helps and
good luck.

                                                        Charles



Quote:

> Steve,

> This is what I wanted to do most all my life, and was finally able to do
it a
> couple of years ago, but only by retiring with an independant income.
It's
> really tough to make a living at woodworking, because so many people are
> willing to do it for nothing.

> The only way I have seen that you can do it is to find a special niche
market,
> and specialize in that. Something like home entertainment system cabinets
or
> commercial restaurant interiors. Unfortunately the projects you mention
are
> being imported from Asia and sold in discount stores for less than you
can by
> the wood for. And no, most people don't know or care about the quality,
they
> just see price.

> Something to do is to go around to craft shows and look at what others
are
> making and selling. Most people on the circuit make cheap "country"
items, and
> they sell well. But if you investigate you will find it takes a lot of
hours,
> and you earn close to minimum wage.

> You can check out some high end galleries and find some beautiful work at
> decent prices. But if you check back in 6 months you  will find the same
items
> still sitting there waiting for a buyer.

> I don't mean to throw cold water on your dreams, but if it was easy and
> profitable there would be about 50 million professional woodworkers in
this
> country.

> John Alexander

> >Hello,
> >I am thinking of turning my hobby of woodworking into a small part time
> business hoping for it to someday go full time. I have some great plans
for
> planters, step stools, cradles, shelves and so on...