Tips for new shop?

Tips for new shop?

Post by bill » Thu, 11 Mar 1999 04:00:00



I am in the process of designing a shop, so I can move out of a two
car garage.  Actually I am calling it my woodturning studio, because
that way I can put in more windows.

The overall footprint will be 28 x 46, with the primary room being 28
x 34. Three rooms in the back, for an office, storage and a
'finishing' room. Bunch of windows, especially on the north side.
Lots of 120 and 240 outlets all around the shop.

Will house basic tools like table saw, bandsaw, planer, drill press,
planer, etc, but primary will be used for turning and wood/turned work
storage.

Couple of man doors, one overhead door. Concrete floor, probably.
Some sort of movable screen or something (maybe like a track like a
hospital bed) to block flying debris when roughing bowls.

Probably some sort of gas heat, maybe ceiling mounted.

I know there have been some threads on shops, but mostly on layout of
lathe, grinding stuff, etc.  

Anyone care to share any thoughts from having built there own larger
shop?

Light sources around the lathe (that can stand the water)?
Distance to the nearest window to avoid breakage?
Height of the ceiling? (I am thinking of around 10-11 ft.)
Other things I will realize once I move in?

Or does anyone know of floor plans specifically for turning shops that
I could look at?  I have the Workshop Book by Scott Landis, but it is
general with a leaning toward traditional woodworking shops.

Most of my turning is bowls (up to about 22 inches) and my main lathe
is a Oneway 2436 with outboard extension, although I am interested in
most kinds of turning eventually.

Thanks for any tips or warnings,
Bill78  
Renton, WA

(On a different note: Surprising to me, of 4 architects I have called
not one has called me back.  They are very busy right now building
expensive homes I guess. I want to involve an architect to make sure
it looks good and fits in with the house rather than looking like I
designed it myself.. heh heh....)

 
 
 

Tips for new shop?

Post by Neill Seige » Thu, 11 Mar 1999 04:00:00


One of the Ellsworth videos gives some good tips on lighting, dust control,
heating etc. I think it's the number 2 video.
-Neill
Quote:

> I am in the process of designing a shop,


 
 
 

Tips for new shop?

Post by Paul Johnsto » Thu, 11 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Where is your  "Money Tree"  or are you made of Money...   :)

Good Luck
PJ

Quote:

>I am in the process of designing a shop, so I can move out of a two
>car garage.  Actually I am calling it my woodturning studio, because
>that way I can put in more windows.

>The overall footprint will be 28 x 46, with the primary room being 28
>x 34. Three rooms in the back, for an office, storage and a
>'finishing' room. Bunch of windows, especially on the north side.
>Lots of 120 and 240 outlets all around the shop.

 
 
 

Tips for new shop?

Post by Howard Kleppe » Thu, 11 Mar 1999 04:00:00


sounds great Bill.  Put your lathe(s) on the north side under the
windows, which you put along the top of the north wall.  High ceilings
not only allow you to move big things around, they expand your design
sense.  Try 11-12 ft. if possible.  Also try to get natural north light
in your finishing room.  Some pallet shelving in your wood storage area
is good.

Consider a good wood stove for heat.  Plusses are pretty much free fuel
and a nice even heat (a circulating fan high up in the middle of the
shop helps).  Minuses are a longer warm-up time.

I have a halogen gooseneck lamp tha is sealed against dust and moisture
attached to my lathe.  Got it from MSC.

Put a small under the counter fridge near the microwave (that you use to
speed up drying).  And a couple of comfortable seats.  Why ever leave?

Two more words:  Dust Collection.

 
 
 

Tips for new shop?

Post by <johnjor.. » Thu, 11 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Bill,

Paint the walls white to go with all those windows-add MORE windows. Paint
the floor to make it look better and to make it easier to clean. Don't store
(much) wood in the studio-it looks like hell, is always dirty, green wood is
moldy etc.

Walls can be 8 ft, but make the trusses so the ceiling rises to 10 ft or so.
It gives most of the advantages, including the feel, of high ceilings, and
has the economy of standard 8 ft materials. I have a ceiling mounted gas
heater, which was one  of the smartest things I have done. I LOVE it.

Good luck,


Quote:
>I am in the process of designing a shop, so I can move out of a two
>car garage.  Actually I am calling it my woodturning studio, because
>that way I can put in more windows.

>The overall footprint will be 28 x 46, with the primary room being 28
>x 34. Three rooms in the back, for an office, storage and a
>'finishing' room. Bunch of windows, especially on the north side.
>Lots of 120 and 240 outlets all around the shop.

>Will house basic tools like table saw, bandsaw, planer, drill press,
>planer, etc, but primary will be used for turning and wood/turned work
>storage.

>Couple of man doors, one overhead door. Concrete floor, probably.
>Some sort of movable screen or something (maybe like a track like a
>hospital bed) to block flying debris when roughing bowls.

>Probably some sort of gas heat, maybe ceiling mounted.

>I know there have been some threads on shops, but mostly on layout of
>lathe, grinding stuff, etc.

>Anyone care to share any thoughts from having built there own larger
>shop?

>Light sources around the lathe (that can stand the water)?
>Distance to the nearest window to avoid breakage?
>Height of the ceiling? (I am thinking of around 10-11 ft.)
>Other things I will realize once I move in?

>Or does anyone know of floor plans specifically for turning shops that
>I could look at?  I have the Workshop Book by Scott Landis, but it is
>general with a leaning toward traditional woodworking shops.

>Most of my turning is bowls (up to about 22 inches) and my main lathe
>is a Oneway 2436 with outboard extension, although I am interested in
>most kinds of turning eventually.

>Thanks for any tips or warnings,
>Bill78
>Renton, WA

>(On a different note: Surprising to me, of 4 architects I have called
>not one has called me back.  They are very busy right now building
>expensive homes I guess. I want to involve an architect to make sure
>it looks good and fits in with the house rather than looking like I
>designed it myself.. heh heh....)

 
 
 

Tips for new shop?

Post by bill » Fri, 12 Mar 1999 04:00:00


You wouldn't ask that if you saw the vehicles my wife and I drive, the
furniture we have at this point, and the P+J (so to speak) sandwiches
I have taken to work for all my life.

It's a lifestyle choice.  When some says to me I wish I could afford a
$4500 lathe and then goes out to their $20,000+ car I realize we both
are happier in our own choices.

But on the other hand, yes I am a bit bonkers about turning. It's a
bit of a sickness...

Regards,
Bill78

When I get the new shop built, maybe I'll announce it so any locals
can drop in for a visit.

Quote:

>Where is your  "Money Tree"  or are you made of Money...   :)

>Good Luck
>PJ


>>I am in the process of designing a shop, so I can move out of a two
>>car garage.  Actually I am calling it my woodturning studio, because
>>that way I can put in more windows.

>>The overall footprint will be 28 x 46, with the primary room being 28
>>x 34. Three rooms in the back, for an office, storage and a
>>'finishing' room. Bunch of windows, especially on the north side.
>>Lots of 120 and 240 outlets all around the shop.

 
 
 

Tips for new shop?

Post by Kubbfa » Fri, 12 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Bill: One thing you might consider is putting down carpet--yes carpet--over
your concrete.  I built a shop smaller than yours (20'x30') and put down an
industrial type carpet.  Everyday I give thanks that I did.  It is much kinder
to your feet, you can drop things without as much damage and I can use the
floor as an additional work bench.  For clean-up I use a two stage vacuum with
a floor sweep.  For loads of shavings from the lathe, I first get the bulk of
shavings with a large dustpan.
Try it--you'll like it!
Jim Lillie
 
 
 

Tips for new shop?

Post by Tom » Fri, 12 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Now for my 2 cents.  I would NOT put the lathe or saw near the window. If
something moves outside and you get distracted while turning ???.   For
the cement, consider an epoxy covering. It will prevent spills from
staining.  Did you consider compressed air system ?  If you can plan where
the tablesaw and lathe will be located, you might consider running
electrical conduit thru floor. This would alleviate dropping power from
above.
Best of luck, and yes, the author is quite jealous.  Tom.
 
 
 

Tips for new shop?

Post by Neill Seige » Fri, 12 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> When I get the new shop built, maybe I'll announce it so any locals
> can drop in for a visit.

Sounds good. What part of the world are you in? Id love to be invited to the
shop warming party.
-Neill
 
 
 

Tips for new shop?

Post by J.T. Dunph » Fri, 12 Mar 1999 04:00:00


I'm green with envey. I gotta work in a 10' x 12' spare bedroom, and moving
is a faint dream for now.  Someday.... sigh.
--
J.T.Dunphy-Turned Treasures
 
 
 

Tips for new shop?

Post by bill » Sat, 13 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Neill,

Renton is east of Seattle, Washington state about 10 miles.  My target
is mid summer, although who knows with the county and mutiple permit
hoops involved.

Unfortunately it's unlikely I will be up and running by the time of
the AAW symposium in June.  Tacoma is just a ways south of here.

Bill78

Quote:


>> When I get the new shop built, maybe I'll announce it so any locals
>> can drop in for a visit.

>Sounds good. What part of the world are you in? Id love to be invited to the
>shop warming party.
>-Neill

 
 
 

Tips for new shop?

Post by Thaler and Thom » Sat, 13 Mar 1999 04:00:00


For a new shop, plan your electrical wiring carefully. Figure one
breaker per duplex outlet.

Plan your dust collection. Oneida will help with your design.
Their stuff costs the same for what you get as other systems.
You just get more so it will cost more but then you will live
longer.

 
 
 

Tips for new shop?

Post by Tom Albe » Sat, 13 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Bill,
Turns out we're almost neighbors. My advise would be on the lighting, (I
am an electrical contractor.)  I would sugest "   "High output"
florescents.  These will cost you a little more, but will start no
matter how cold it is and also give you more lumins per watt than the
regular.  I put 8 footers in my garage and suprised myself with the
increase in light compared to the regular.

As far as circuits for outlets, what you are going to do is the key to
the answer.  If you are the only one who will be working out there, you
will only be using one power tool at a time. (Unless you are more
talented than I)  In my shop I ran one circuit on one wall, one for the
lathe, and one on the other (opposite) wall.  I,ve never overloaded the
circuits.  Circuits for dust collection, and lighting should be
seperate.

Hope this has been of some use,
Tom Albers
Lacey, WA

 
 
 

Tips for new shop?

Post by ljhg » Sun, 14 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Hi All,

I recently attended a workshop of a friend of mine and all around his lathe
he had put down carpet. He got some of that cheap ***-backed stuff that
someone wass throwing out, cut it into 18" squares and put it down upside
down, with the *** up. It lokked fine, and wass really warm on the feet
on what was a very cold day. He says he doesn't get as tired standing at the
lathe with them down.

Just a cheapo suggestion!
Fran in Ireland

 
 
 

Tips for new shop?

Post by Howard Kleppe » Sun, 14 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
>  In my shop I ran one circuit on one wall, one for the
> lathe, and one on the other (opposite) wall.  I,ve never overloaded the
> circuits.  Circuits for dust collection, and lighting should be
> seperate.

I've found it helpful to have 4-plex boxes with one circuit on the right
side of the boxes and another on the left, rather than one circuit for
each wall.  This way I can plug in lamps to one circuit and small power
tools on the other at any place in the shop.