American Elm

American Elm

Post by cyrusandmag.. » Mon, 15 May 2000 04:00:00



I can get some freshly cut elm logs. Is this wood good for turning
bowls? Any problems?

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American Elm

Post by alan.squi.. » Mon, 15 May 2000 04:00:00


One of the first pieces I ever turned was a small lidded pot in English
elm. I was very proud of the result at the time! Most of the turning was
done with glass paper if my memory serves me right. 60 grit at that! I
still have the pot 20 years on, its absolute cr.. rubbish.

English elm is very tough and hard, so you need razor sharp tools all
the time. With some care the finish you can obtain is very good. I still
turn bits of elm and do like the wood. If American elm is related to
English elm I hope your lathe is close to your grinder.

Have fun with it.

Alan

Quote:

> I can get some freshly cut elm logs. Is this wood good for turning
> bowls? Any problems?

> Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> Before you buy.


 
 
 

American Elm

Post by shaving » Mon, 15 May 2000 04:00:00



Quote:

> I can get some freshly cut elm logs. Is this wood good for turning
> bowls?

especially fresh green turned, yup it is great....
once tiy starts to dry though it turns tough, stringy, has a tendancy to
check badly and twist all over the place....

Quote:
> Any problems?

stringy interlocking grain, _SHARP_ tools are teh key to prevent huge
craters of tear-out.

--
John Gunterman ..... http://www.shavings.net

http://www.geocities.com/shavings_net/clown.avi

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American Elm

Post by Sphyrnatu » Mon, 15 May 2000 04:00:00


I've got  a pile of it. It checks like mad, but is nice for turning. If you
can, turn it while its still green, as it gets pretty tough once its dry.
if you;re going to let it dry before you turn it, expect a lot of checking -
I've got some logs that I;ve sealed every month, and the end looks like a giant
spider web - I expect to lose at least 8-12 inches form each end (these logs
are about 16-18 " diameter)..
--JD
 
 
 

American Elm

Post by ERich109 » Mon, 15 May 2000 04:00:00


Quote:
>I can get some freshly cut elm logs. Is this wood good for turning
>bowls? Any problems?

This is really an off-topic reply.  My dad grew up very poor in a small town in
Down-East Maine.  They used to get firewood drifted in on the tide.  I once
asked him how they cut up and split tough elm that was quite common then before
dutch elm disease.  He replied that they would go up to the local hardware
store, buy a half stick of dynamite, drill a hole in the trunk, light the fuse
and run like hell.  Apparently 1/4 stick at a time would be quite effective in
making stove ready firewood.

I think now I had a really deprived childhood not having the same opportunities
to lose limbs that he did.

Earle Rich
Mont Vernon, NH

 
 
 

American Elm

Post by S S Law » Tue, 16 May 2000 04:00:00


I'm spending some time here in Ireland and yesterday saw some bowls and
platters turned by Liam O'Neill from elm and they are gorgeous. Nice grain,
etc., so I wouldn't hesitate. I'm trying to find some elm or holly to smuggle
back to States!!
Jay Sweeney
 
 
 

American Elm

Post by Georg » Tue, 16 May 2000 04:00:00


Remember my neighbor, "only" seventy-two at the time, demonstrating the
proper way to split elm.  He took a felling axe, struck tangent to the
annual rings, and flipped off slab after slab as he worked around the log.
Apparently it's all in the wrist, because his brother (three years younger)
and I couldn't duplicate it.  His brother said that Ralph had learned it
from his dad, but he never had.

Elm's a workout to split, but friendly to turn.  Stinks, though.  Steam
small pieces dry in those perforated vegetable bags.  Microwave if you dare
on days when you can keep the windows open, and then wipe the inside of the
microwave with dilute bleach solution to clear the odor.

I'm lopping up a small one the power company's brushing crews cut down last
week, and intend to have it all roughed by the end of this one.


Quote:
> This is really an off-topic reply.  My dad grew up very poor in a small
town in
> Down-East Maine.  They used to get firewood drifted in on the tide.  I
once
> asked him how they cut up and split tough elm that was quite common then
before
> dutch elm disease.  He replied that they would go up to the local hardware
> store, buy a half stick of dynamite, drill a hole in the trunk, light the
fuse
> and run like hell.  Apparently 1/4 stick at a time would be quite
effective in
> making stove ready firewood.