light box

light box

Post by William Hursthous » Thu, 18 Nov 2004 13:55:58



I remember seeing a neat light box for photographing turnings, I would
like to build a simple, fairly portable one to photograph the objects
brought along to "show and tell" at our local club, can anyone point
me a site where there are instructions, or even just pictures?

Thanks very much

William

 
 
 

light box

Post by Alan » Thu, 18 Nov 2004 19:03:20


G'day William,

Earlier today I finished preparing the newsletter for the group I am
with.  I use a Canon G3 digital and photograph with the in camera
flash at a high resolution.

I don't seem to have a problem obtaining good results, though I have
started to experiment at home to establish a better setup should
anyone want better photographs of their work.

I'll send you some examples of what I end up with.  Perhpas you are
striving for something better.

I saw one of your countrymen demonstrating at Woodturn 2004 in
October.

Safe turning,
Alan

On Wed, 17 Nov 2004 17:55:58 +1300, William Hursthouse

Quote:

>I remember seeing a neat light box for photographing turnings, I would
>like to build a simple, fairly portable one to photograph the objects
>brought along to "show and tell" at our local club, can anyone point
>me a site where there are instructions, or even just pictures?

>Thanks very much

>William


 
 
 

light box

Post by Michael Latch » Thu, 18 Nov 2004 20:14:05


A couple of years ago, John Jordan put together a web site to show us how he
photographs his turnings:

http://www.geocities.com/stubbylathe/index.html


Quote:
>I remember seeing a neat light box for photographing turnings, I would
> like to build a simple, fairly portable one to photograph the objects
> brought along to "show and tell" at our local club, can anyone point
> me a site where there are instructions, or even just pictures?

> Thanks very much

> William

 
 
 

light box

Post by Michael Latch » Thu, 18 Nov 2004 21:03:31


Is this something like what you have in mind?

http://www.pbase.com/wlhuber/light_box

Michael Latcha - at home in Redford, MI


Quote:
>I remember seeing a neat light box for photographing turnings, I would
> like to build a simple, fairly portable one to photograph the objects
> brought along to "show and tell" at our local club, can anyone point
> me a site where there are instructions, or even just pictures?

> Thanks very much

> William

 
 
 

light box

Post by Georg » Thu, 18 Nov 2004 21:40:39


Turnings are no different than other objects to be photographed.  All the
suggestions I've seen have been the same as you'll find as "tents" in
photography texts.   Can be as elaborate as what Michael gave you or as
simple as a cheesecloth drape to break the light at midday.  One thing you
do want to do is get a vanishing background of some sort.   I take a piece
of artist board of the proper color and curve it up from the piece, making
it both my short foreground and vanishing back.

Use the white backs of your other background boards for fill-in reflectors.


Quote:
> I remember seeing a neat light box for photographing turnings, I would
> like to build a simple, fairly portable one to photograph the objects
> brought along to "show and tell" at our local club, can anyone point
> me a site where there are instructions, or even just pictures?

> Thanks very much

> William

 
 
 

light box

Post by Tony Manell » Thu, 18 Nov 2004 22:41:40


Hi William,
I don't have mine shown on my website but here's a brief description.  I
made a cube shaped frame from 1/2" pvc.  I have drafting vellum rolled up
around a couple of the sides, which I unroll and tape to the other side, as
a light diffuser.  My background is a window light shade from the local
borg.  It is sprayed grey with fabric dye.  I drape it down from the back
and let it curve as it goes under the turning.  It goes up and breaks down
quickly.  Hope this is clear.
Tony Manella
ndd1"at"prolog.net (remove "at")
http://home.ptd.net/~ndd1/
Lehigh Valley Woodturners
http://www.lehighvalleywoodturners.com/


Quote:
> I remember seeing a neat light box for photographing turnings, I would
> like to build a simple, fairly portable one to photograph the objects
> brought along to "show and tell" at our local club, can anyone point
> me a site where there are instructions, or even just pictures?

> Thanks very much

> William

 
 
 

light box

Post by William Hursthous » Fri, 19 Nov 2004 04:15:58




Quote:
>G'day William,

>Earlier today I finished preparing the newsletter for the group I am
>with.  I use a Canon G3 digital and photograph with the in camera
>flash at a high resolution.

>I don't seem to have a problem obtaining good results, though I have
>started to experiment at home to establish a better setup should
>anyone want better photographs of their work.

>I'll send you some examples of what I end up with.  Perhpas you are
>striving for something better.

>I saw one of your countrymen demonstrating at Woodturn 2004 in
>October.

>Safe turning,
>Alan

Hi Alan,

who was that? Terry Scott?

william

 
 
 

light box

Post by William Hursthous » Fri, 19 Nov 2004 04:14:38


Hi Michael ,

Thanks very much - I had seen this page before and, yes, this is what
I had in mind. But I will also study your exposition, and thanks very
much to all the other replies, much appreciated!

William

Quote:
>Is this something like what you have in mind?

>http://www.pbase.com/wlhuber/light_box

>Michael Latcha - at home in Redford, MI



>>I remember seeing a neat light box for photographing turnings, I would
>> like to build a simple, fairly portable one to photograph the objects
>> brought along to "show and tell" at our local club, can anyone point
>> me a site where there are instructions, or even just pictures?

>> Thanks very much

>> William

 
 
 

light box

Post by Alan » Fri, 19 Nov 2004 13:14:25


I think it was Sorin Berger(?) the scoop and thin hat man!

I tried to drop you an e-mail at the amended address below and it
bounced back.  Maybe you have a good spam filter in place.

I use a digital (Canon G3) with its inbuilt flash and this seems to be
suitable for the newsletter I prepare.  I have been toying with the
prospect of organising a more elaborate setup for very intricate
works.  For the show and tell table, I would not have time to do them
all any way other than that currently in use.

You can get me on chnews at(use the symbol) iinet dot net dot au if
you want to establish contact directly.  I edit the newsletter for a
Sydney regional group.

Safe turning,
Alan

On Thu, 18 Nov 2004 08:15:58 +1300, William Hursthouse

Quote:



>>G'day William,

>>Earlier today I finished preparing the newsletter for the group I am
>>with.  I use a Canon G3 digital and photograph with the in camera
>>flash at a high resolution.

>>I don't seem to have a problem obtaining good results, though I have
>>started to experiment at home to establish a better setup should
>>anyone want better photographs of their work.

>>I'll send you some examples of what I end up with.  Perhpas you are
>>striving for something better.

>>I saw one of your countrymen demonstrating at Woodturn 2004 in
>>October.

>>Safe turning,
>>Alan

>Hi Alan,

>who was that? Terry Scott?

>william

 
 
 

light box

Post by Andy Dingle » Mon, 22 Nov 2004 00:37:08


On Wed, 17 Nov 2004 17:55:58 +1300, William Hursthouse

Quote:

>I remember seeing a neat light box for photographing turnings,

My general setup for this is two lengths of 1mm fibreglass kite spar
(a very useful material) and a length of white ripstop nylon. Sew it
all together to make a "stretcher".  Sew three short lengths of spar
into cross-wise pockets (you might want to make them removable from
one end) Then use two lengths of matching silicone hose to bends the
spar ends together into circles and fasten it all together.

You now have a circular drum of translucent diffusing fabric, with a
big gap at the front.  Set it up on your table, place the object
inside, the camera tripod facing the gap and arrange lights around the
outsides of the diffuser until you're happy.  Cheap Ikea halogen
desklamps are useful for this.  If it's glass or silver, place a
single small light inside the diffuser to produce highlights.

Use a digital camera and a laptop, because rapid feedback of
large-size images is an important part of the light adjusting process.

--
Smert' spamionam