How to Sand Natural Edge Bowl?

How to Sand Natural Edge Bowl?

Post by Derek Hartzel » Sun, 25 May 2003 05:14:31



I find that I spend quite a bit of time sanding my natural edge bowls.   Can
you give my any shortcuts.  Here is my process.

1. Turn bottom of bowl including recess for Stronghold chuck while on
faceplate.
2.  Mount bowl on chuck.
3.  Shear scrape outside of bowl to smooth and to account for any
eccentricity caused by change of mounting.
4. Hollow inside of bowl (not using bowl steady anywhere in process).
5. Shear scrape inside of bowl.
NOTE: Some of the wood I turn is very wet.  The apple slings water to the
ceiling.
6. Use heatgun to dry the outside of the wood.
7.  Sand the outside.  Clean clogged power sanding disc with *** stick.
Alternate between 6 and 7 until the wood gets dry enough.
8. Sand the inside.  It is generally pretty dry by this time.
9.  Reverse turn with jam chuck to finish foot.

My lathe is a 14" Delta with a low speed of 4-500 rpm.

Between the turning and the sanding, the bowl ovalizes and the sanding has
to go deep enough to almost get the bowl back to round to get to the bowl
smooth all the way around.

Suggestions?

Thanks,

Derek

 
 
 

How to Sand Natural Edge Bowl?

Post by Peter Teube » Sun, 25 May 2003 06:24:01


Quote:

>I find that I spend quite a bit of time sanding my natural edge bowls.   Can
>you give my any shortcuts.  Here is my process.

>1. Turn bottom of bowl including recess for Stronghold chuck while on
>faceplate.
>2.  Mount bowl on chuck.
>3.  Shear scrape outside of bowl to smooth and to account for any
>eccentricity caused by change of mounting.
>4. Hollow inside of bowl (not using bowl steady anywhere in process).
>5. Shear scrape inside of bowl.
>NOTE: Some of the wood I turn is very wet.  The apple slings water to the
>ceiling.
>6. Use heatgun to dry the outside of the wood.
>7.  Sand the outside.  Clean clogged power sanding disc with *** stick.
>Alternate between 6 and 7 until the wood gets dry enough.
>8. Sand the inside.  It is generally pretty dry by this time.
>9.  Reverse turn with jam chuck to finish foot.

Use the heat gun to dry the INSIDE surface first, then sand the inside. I always sand the inside first. The centrifical force will
force the water to the OUTSIDE. By the time I get to the outside, its dry enough to forgo the heat gun.

Peter Teubel
Milford, MA
http://www.FoundCollection.com/

 
 
 

How to Sand Natural Edge Bowl?

Post by Rut » Sun, 25 May 2003 06:35:27


the sanding has to go deep enough to almost get the bowl back to round
to get to the bowl smooth all the way around."
***************************
Derek,
   If it's a natural-edge bowl, why do you need to make it go "back to
round"?  If you have a nice smooth finish and it warps to oval, that's a
characteristic of "natural" wood and, in my opinion, looks great on
natural-edge bowls.  

Ruth

Woodturners Logo
My shop and Turnings at
http://www.torne-lignum.com

 
 
 

How to Sand Natural Edge Bowl?

Post by Leif Thorvaldso » Sun, 25 May 2003 07:37:26


Derek:  If you  used LDD you wouldn't have a problem with "ovalizing."

Leif

Quote:
> I find that I spend quite a bit of time sanding my natural edge bowls.
Can
> you give my any shortcuts.  Here is my process.

> 1. Turn bottom of bowl including recess for Stronghold chuck while on
> faceplate.
> 2.  Mount bowl on chuck.
> 3.  Shear scrape outside of bowl to smooth and to account for any
> eccentricity caused by change of mounting.
> 4. Hollow inside of bowl (not using bowl steady anywhere in process).
> 5. Shear scrape inside of bowl.
> NOTE: Some of the wood I turn is very wet.  The apple slings water to the
> ceiling.
> 6. Use heatgun to dry the outside of the wood.
> 7.  Sand the outside.  Clean clogged power sanding disc with *** stick.
> Alternate between 6 and 7 until the wood gets dry enough.
> 8. Sand the inside.  It is generally pretty dry by this time.
> 9.  Reverse turn with jam chuck to finish foot.

> My lathe is a 14" Delta with a low speed of 4-500 rpm.

> Between the turning and the sanding, the bowl ovalizes and the sanding has
> to go deep enough to almost get the bowl back to round to get to the bowl
> smooth all the way around.

> Suggestions?

> Thanks,

> Derek

 
 
 

How to Sand Natural Edge Bowl?

Post by Georg » Sun, 25 May 2003 08:11:04


I don't usually.  Time enough to do that when they're dry.

Fling all the water out at a high speed and let it sit.   I find it easier
to make the bark look right this way, because it shrinks at a different rate
than the wood.  As most will look oval even when they're not ( I re-turn
some, too), it shouldn't matter.

I sand with a flexible shaft sander or my right angle Makita, depending on
clearance, so it's a fast job.  Sanding wet spends more time cleaning paper
than doing the whole thing dry.


Quote:
> I find that I spend quite a bit of time sanding my natural edge bowls.
Can
> you give my any shortcuts.

 
 
 

How to Sand Natural Edge Bowl?

Post by ed fren » Sun, 25 May 2003 12:25:44


Try wet sanding. It won't stress the wood like using a heat gun. Trade
your electric power sander in for an air sander (<$20 from Harbor
Freight). If you want to go all out, use the garden hose to supply the
wet and wear raingear.  It's lots of fun :)
Quote:


> >I find that I spend quite a bit of time sanding my natural edge bowls.   Can
> >you give my any shortcuts.  Here is my process.

> >1. Turn bottom of bowl including recess for Stronghold chuck while on
> >faceplate.
> >2.  Mount bowl on chuck.
> >3.  Shear scrape outside of bowl to smooth and to account for any
> >eccentricity caused by change of mounting.
> >4. Hollow inside of bowl (not using bowl steady anywhere in process).
> >5. Shear scrape inside of bowl.
> >NOTE: Some of the wood I turn is very wet.  The apple slings water to the
> >ceiling.
> >6. Use heatgun to dry the outside of the wood.
> >7.  Sand the outside.  Clean clogged power sanding disc with *** stick.
> >Alternate between 6 and 7 until the wood gets dry enough.
> >8. Sand the inside.  It is generally pretty dry by this time.
> >9.  Reverse turn with jam chuck to finish foot.

> Use the heat gun to dry the INSIDE surface first, then sand the inside. I always sand the inside first. The centrifical force will
> force the water to the OUTSIDE. By the time I get to the outside, its dry enough to forgo the heat gun.

> Peter Teubel
> Milford, MA
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/

 
 
 

How to Sand Natural Edge Bowl?

Post by Bill Da » Sun, 25 May 2003 22:46:41


Quote:
>9.  Reverse turn with jam chuck to finish foot.

umm..if it is natural edge, how do you jam-chuck it?

Quote:
>Between the turning and the sanding, the bowl ovalizes and the sanding has
>to go deep enough to almost get the bowl back to round to get to the bowl
>smooth all the way around.

echoing Ruth...'oval'  is a **feature** in natural edged, wet sanded
bowls...unless you want to fit a lid to something, roundness is just
extra work.
Quote:
>Suggestions?

 as was mentioned, sand inside first....and depending on how thin you
turn, sanding may dry it enough that no other drying method is needed.
Quote:
>Thanks,

>Derek

 
 
 

How to Sand Natural Edge Bowl?

Post by Barry N. Turne » Sun, 25 May 2003 23:27:23


Well, not with a jam chuck that fits the rim, obviously.  But with a jam
chuck that fits the interior profile of the bowl.  The bowl is sandwiched
between this "jam chuck" and the tailstock.  Turn the foot of the bowl,
leaving just a small nub for the tailstock center.  Then stop the lathe and
remove the nub with a carving chisel.

Barry


Quote:

> >9.  Reverse turn with jam chuck to finish foot.

> umm..if it is natural edge, how do you jam-chuck it?

> >Between the turning and the sanding, the bowl ovalizes and the sanding
has
> >to go deep enough to almost get the bowl back to round to get to the bowl
> >smooth all the way around.
> echoing Ruth...'oval'  is a **feature** in natural edged, wet sanded
> bowls...unless you want to fit a lid to something, roundness is just
> extra work.
> >Suggestions?
>  as was mentioned, sand inside first....and depending on how thin you
> turn, sanding may dry it enough that no other drying method is needed.
> >Thanks,

> >Derek

 
 
 

How to Sand Natural Edge Bowl?

Post by Ken Grunk » Mon, 26 May 2003 01:50:20


Derek Hartzell wrote on Friday 23 May 2003 03:14 pm:

Quote:

> Between the turning and the sanding, the bowl ovalizes and the sanding has
> to go deep enough to almost get the bowl back to round to get to the bowl
> smooth all the way around.

Green, wet wood is so much fun to turn but gives the most amount of warpage
in the smallest amount of time if you try to turn a bowl all the way to
finish thickness in one setting.
With such wood, I rough-turn it to about 3/4 inch thickness. If it's
something that needs to get done soon, I'll microwave it several times over
the course of a day. With the full cook setting I heat it just enough each
time to be almost too hot to touch, with a little steam coming off. Give an
hour or two between each treatment.
After 3 or 4 microwave sessions, it's at least dry enough throughout to
sand without clogging, and has already warped some so it won't do much more
of that.
My advice is to replace your heatgun with a microwave, which heats the wood
more evenly instead of just the surface. I found one cheap at a thrift
store, it's a useful tool for the woodturner.

Ken Grunke
http://www.token.crwoodturner.com/

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How to Sand Natural Edge Bowl?

Post by Derek Hartzel » Tue, 27 May 2003 00:06:01


I don't have a smooth enough finish off the gouge for skipping sanding.
So, as I dry the wood enough to sand, the wood ovalizes.  With the 4-500 rpm
minimum speed, the sander doesn't track the surface well enough on a large
bowl (like a 13" long axis I just did).  So it is not really touching some
areas until the ovalization is sanded out.  I don't mind the post-sanding
warpage.
Quote:


> the sanding has to go deep enough to almost get the bowl back to round
> to get to the bowl smooth all the way around."
> ***************************
> Derek,
>    If it's a natural-edge bowl, why do you need to make it go "back to
> round"?  If you have a nice smooth finish and it warps to oval, that's a
> characteristic of "natural" wood and, in my opinion, looks great on
> natural-edge bowls.

> Ruth

> Woodturners Logo
> My shop and Turnings at
> http://www.torne-lignum.com

 
 
 

How to Sand Natural Edge Bowl?

Post by Derek Hartzel » Tue, 27 May 2003 00:00:14


I should have said that I use a friction chuck by holding the bowl between a
block in my chuck (with fine sandpaper on it) and the tailstock.
Quote:
> umm..if it is natural edge, how do you jam-chuck it?

 
 
 

How to Sand Natural Edge Bowl?

Post by Leo Lichtma » Tue, 27 May 2003 01:31:24


Quote:
----- Original Message -----
From: Barry N. Turner
Subject: Re: How to Sand Natural Edge Bowl?

Well, not with a jam chuck that fits the rim, obviously.  But with a jam
chuck that fits the interior profile of the bowl.  The bowl is sandwiched
between this "jam chuck" and the tailstock (clip)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Or, use a little vacuum.  You can think of the vacuum as a "phantom"
tailstock, that never gets in the way.

 
 
 

How to Sand Natural Edge Bowl?

Post by Mike Vor » Tue, 27 May 2003 03:39:36


I've taken to putting my 2" disk in a morse/jacobs chuck, and putting
that in the headstock.  Then I hold the bowl and move it about the
stationary (spinning)sander.  that way I can concentrate on specific
spots that may need sanding.

mike

Quote:

> I don't have a smooth enough finish off the gouge for skipping sanding.
> So, as I dry the wood enough to sand, the wood ovalizes.  With the 4-500 rpm
> minimum speed, the sander doesn't track the surface well enough on a large
> bowl (like a 13" long axis I just did).  So it is not really touching some
> areas until the ovalization is sanded out.  I don't mind the post-sanding
> warpage.


>> the sanding has to go deep enough to almost get the bowl back to round
>> to get to the bowl smooth all the way around."
>> ***************************
>> Derek,
>>    If it's a natural-edge bowl, why do you need to make it go "back to
>> round"?  If you have a nice smooth finish and it warps to oval, that's a
>> characteristic of "natural" wood and, in my opinion, looks great on
>> natural-edge bowls.

>> Ruth

>> Woodturners Logo
>> My shop and Turnings at
>> http://www.torne-lignum.com

--
 Michael Vore, W3CCV       M-ASA [Ka8]; WHIRL, ABC; CAW, CW, AAW
      http://mike.vorefamily.net/ohmywoodness   <-Custom Woodworking
      http://mike.vorefamily.net/thewoodenradio <-The weblog
 
 
 

How to Sand Natural Edge Bowl?

Post by Mike Vor » Tue, 27 May 2003 03:42:35


Try to find some foam *** - carpet pad about 1/2" thick works great, and
doesn't leave any marks.

mike

Quote:

> I should have said that I use a friction chuck by holding the bowl between a
> block in my chuck (with fine sandpaper on it) and the tailstock.

>> umm..if it is natural edge, how do you jam-chuck it?

--
 Michael Vore, W3CCV       M-ASA [Ka8]; WHIRL, ABC; CAW, CW, AAW
      http://www.FoundCollection.com/; <-Custom Woodworking
      http://www.FoundCollection.com/;-The weblog
 
 
 

How to Sand Natural Edge Bowl?

Post by Ralp » Wed, 28 May 2003 01:29:53


Sounds like you need to slow the bowl down.

Ralph

Quote:
> I don't have a smooth enough finish off the gouge for skipping sanding.
> So, as I dry the wood enough to sand, the wood ovalizes.  With the 4-500
rpm
> minimum speed, the sander doesn't track the surface well enough on a large
> bowl (like a 13" long axis I just did).  So it is not really touching some
> areas until the ovalization is sanded out.  I don't mind the post-sanding
> warpage.


> > the sanding has to go deep enough to almost get the bowl back to round
> > to get to the bowl smooth all the way around."
> > ***************************
> > Derek,
> >    If it's a natural-edge bowl, why do you need to make it go "back to
> > round"?  If you have a nice smooth finish and it warps to oval, that's a
> > characteristic of "natural" wood and, in my opinion, looks great on
> > natural-edge bowls.

> > Ruth

> > Woodturners Logo
> > My shop and Turnings at
> > http://www.torne-lignum.com