Interesting news - old news...

Interesting news - old news...

Post by Moshe Eshe » Fri, 19 May 2006 04:54:17



A very old log was found in a pond (thousands of years old) and this
guy gets to turn it into bowls... I wonder how the wood works.

http://www.huntsvilleforester.com/1147884364/

Sounds interesting, and I would like to see more pictures than they
provide

 
 
 

Interesting news - old news...

Post by Owen Low » Fri, 19 May 2006 06:36:00




Quote:
> A very old log was found in a pond (thousands of years old) and this
> guy gets to turn it into bowls... I wonder how the wood works.

> http://www.huntsvilleforester.com/1147884364/

> Sounds interesting, and I would like to see more pictures than they
> provide

Thanks for the link Moshe - the age is surely impressive and brings to
mind how the world was then and what changes have taken place while that
log lay buried for so long, but, to my eye, it's not very attractive.

A couple summers ago, a Douglas Fir died in the park across the street
from our house and needed to be taken down. The ring count was something
on the order of 200 years, IIRC. It was amazing to me, that a little
seedling was taking hold where I was standing as Lewis and Clark were
making their way along the Columbia River.

--
Owen Lowe

Northwest Woodturners
Pacific Northwest Woodturning Guild
___
Tips fer Turnin': Place a sign, easily seen as you switch on your lathe, warning you to remove any and all rings from your fingers. Called degloving, extended hardware can grab your ring and rip it off your finger. A pic for the strong of stomach: <www.itim.nsw.gov.au/go/objectid/2A3AC703-1321-1C29-70B067DC88E16BFC/i...>

Besides, rings can easily mar the surface of a turning as you check for finished smoothness.

 
 
 

Interesting news - old news...

Post by Lobby Dosse » Fri, 19 May 2006 07:12:48


Quote:

> A couple summers ago, a Douglas Fir died in the park across the street
> from our house and needed to be taken down. The ring count was something
> on the order of 200 years, IIRC. It was amazing to me, that a little
> seedling was taking hold where I was standing as Lewis and Clark were
> making their way along the Columbia River.

Also amazing it wasn't logged.
 
 
 

Interesting news - old news...

Post by l.vander.. » Fri, 19 May 2006 10:35:59


Hi Moshe

The tree wasn't that old, but it's amazing that it had not rotted away
in all this time.
I have a couple of small chunks of Kauri wood that my sister brought
back from New Zealand, It is carbon dated to be between 30.000 and
50.000 years old.
People in New Zealand turn and use the wood for souvenirs etc., I
haven't got the gumption yet to cut them into just another bottle
stopper etc.
For what I know, the wood does not turn any better than the new wood,
probably the same with that white pine, there is better turning wood
out there, but not much with a history like that, must be nice to be
able to turn real old Olive wood, and it would turn much better I bet.
Tanks for the link Moshe.

Have fun and take care
Leo Van Der Loo

 
 
 

Interesting news - old news...

Post by Owen Low » Fri, 19 May 2006 14:42:18




Quote:
> Also amazing it wasn't logged.

Kinda... the town was founded when the tree was about 75 years old and
I'm pretty sure the park was established c.1900 (tree would have been
about 100). At that age, the tree wouldn't have been particularly
desirable considering the quantity of multi-centuries old trees in the
surrounding area. By the time this tree became desirably large, the city
had grown up around it and the park was entrenched so no one would have
considered removing it for lumber.

--
Owen Lowe

Northwest Woodturners
Pacific Northwest Woodturning Guild
___
Tips fer Turnin': Place a sign, easily seen as you switch on your lathe, warning you to remove any and all rings from your fingers. Called degloving, extended hardware can grab your ring and rip it off your finger. A pic for the strong of stomach: <www.itim.nsw.gov.au/go/objectid/2A3AC703-1321-1C29-70B067DC88E16BFC/i...>

Besides, rings can easily mar the surface of a turning as you check for finished smoothness.