Advice from those who have been there please!

Advice from those who have been there please!

Post by James R. Johnso » Sat, 29 Jan 2000 04:00:00



Time for an upgrade!

Quote:

>Today as I turned a maple blank into a bowl I noticed I was getting some
tear
>out on the end grain despite the fact that I have a very sharp tool cutting
and
>easy thread of shavings from the tool.  I was using a light touch, trying
to do
>everything right and still got rough end grain.  This was dry wood.  Now I
>admit to some slight vibration in my "cheap O" Delta bench top lathe.
Could
>the vibration cause the problem?  Any other suggestions?

 
 
 

Advice from those who have been there please!

Post by Fred Holde » Sat, 29 Jan 2000 04:00:00


I personally have found that some dry maple is very likely to tear endgrain no
matter how light your cut and how sharp your chisel. You may have such a piece.
You might try a little oil on the surface and see if lubricating the fibers a
bit will allow them to cut cleanly instead of pulling out. I've found this works
sometimes. Sometimes, the best way to clean it up is 60 grit sandpaper.

Fred Holder
<http://www.fholder.com/>


says...

Quote:

>Today as I turned a maple blank into a bowl I noticed I was getting some tear
>out on the end grain despite the fact that I have a very sharp tool cutting and
>easy thread of shavings from the tool.  I was using a light touch, trying to do
>everything right and still got rough end grain.  This was dry wood.  Now I
>admit to some slight vibration in my "cheap O" Delta bench top lathe.  Could
>the vibration cause the problem?  Any other suggestions?

Fred Holder
<http://www.fholder.com/>

 
 
 

Advice from those who have been there please!

Post by RESPITE » Sun, 30 Jan 2000 04:00:00


Today as I turned a maple blank into a bowl I noticed I was getting some tear
out on the end grain despite the fact that I have a very sharp tool cutting and
easy thread of shavings from the tool.  I was using a light touch, trying to do
everything right and still got rough end grain.  This was dry wood.  Now I
admit to some slight vibration in my "cheap O" Delta bench top lathe.  Could
the vibration cause the problem?  Any other suggestions?
 
 
 

Advice from those who have been there please!

Post by George Nazark » Sun, 30 Jan 2000 04:00:00


Vibration was probably due to the cutting problem, not the cause.  Pure and
simple, it's no pleasure cutting end-grain maple, be it hard or soft.  The
transition from face cut to end cut changes the drag on the tool, and can
lead to vibration and resonance chattering.

I like to take my 1/2" or 3/8" spindle gouge, set it almost on edge,
preferably on my curved toolrest so my angle of attack is fairly constant,
and shave my way to the bottom.  These shavings are translucent, so it's not
much of a cut.  The gouge makes about an (\) angle to the work.  Some might
call it shearing.  Since the bevel rides on the way, you can compress some
end grain if you've got a real abrupt transition from wall to floor.
Lifting the bevel works, but takes a firm hand.

Never tried the oil method, though the theory behind it is the same that
leads me to wet end grain prior to scraping in general cabinet work.  The
softer fibers cut smoother.

Which one do you have - 46-700?  Mine's a 46-204.

Quote:

>Today as I turned a maple blank into a bowl I noticed I was getting some
tear
>out on the end grain despite the fact that I have a very sharp tool cutting
and
>easy thread of shavings from the tool.  I was using a light touch, trying
to do
>everything right and still got rough end grain.  This was dry wood.  Now I
>admit to some slight vibration in my "cheap O" Delta bench top lathe.
Could
>the vibration cause the problem?  Any other suggestions?

 
 
 

Advice from those who have been there please!

Post by rangerd.. » Sun, 30 Jan 2000 04:00:00


Sometimes, mineral oil will do the trick as has been suggested. If not,
it will act as a lubricant when you switch to a minimum 80 grit
sandpaper. Keep the speed of the lathe down so you don't create alot of
heat which will cause checking.
Ranger***



Quote:
> Vibration was probably due to the cutting problem, not the cause.
Pure and
> simple, it's no pleasure cutting end-grain maple, be it hard or
soft.  The
> transition from face cut to end cut changes the drag on the tool, and
can
> lead to vibration and resonance chattering.

> I like to take my 1/2" or 3/8" spindle gouge, set it almost on edge,
> preferably on my curved toolrest so my angle of attack is fairly
constant,
> and shave my way to the bottom.  These shavings are translucent, so
it's not
> much of a cut.  The gouge makes about an (\) angle to the work.  Some
might
> call it shearing.  Since the bevel rides on the way, you can compress
some
> end grain if you've got a real abrupt transition from wall to floor.
> Lifting the bevel works, but takes a firm hand.

> Never tried the oil method, though the theory behind it is the same
that
> leads me to wet end grain prior to scraping in general cabinet work.
The
> softer fibers cut smoother.

> Which one do you have - 46-700?  Mine's a 46-204.


cd1.aol.com>...
> >Today as I turned a maple blank into a bowl I noticed I was getting
some
> tear
> >out on the end grain despite the fact that I have a very sharp tool
cutting
> and
> >easy thread of shavings from the tool.  I was using a light touch,
trying
> to do
> >everything right and still got rough end grain.  This was dry wood.
Now I
> >admit to some slight vibration in my "cheap O" Delta bench top lathe.
> Could
> >the vibration cause the problem?  Any other suggestions?

Sent via Deja.com http://www.FoundCollection.com/
Before you buy.
 
 
 

Advice from those who have been there please!

Post by Dan Nelso » Tue, 01 Feb 2000 04:00:00



says...
Quote:
>On "dry" wood, I've found that getting tear out just happens, no matter how
>sharp my tool is. However, I learned a little trick from watching a Ray Key
>video. Try rubbing a little paste wax into the area of tear out, then try
>turning it. The wax tends to soften the wood fibers, which lets the tool cut
>them more cleanly. It usually works for me. Hope this info helps.-----Dan
>Today as I turned a maple blank into a bowl I noticed I was getting some tear
>out on the end grain despite the fact that I have a very sharp tool cutting and
>easy thread of shavings from the tool.  I was using a light touch, trying to do
>everything right and still got rough end grain.  This was dry wood.  Now I
>admit to some slight vibration in my "cheap O" Delta bench top lathe.  Could
>the vibration cause the problem?  Any other suggestions?