Bandsaw blade

Bandsaw blade

Post by L. Peter Stace » Wed, 26 Apr 2000 04:00:00



Recently the blade on the bandsaw broke. Is there any way of repairing the
blade?
I have an arc welder and LPG equipment.
--
********************************
    ,-._|\         L. Peter Stacey
  /  Oz  \       Melbourne Australia

          v
 
 
 

Bandsaw blade

Post by L. Peter Stace » Thu, 27 Apr 2000 04:00:00


Thank you all for your replies.

I am new to woodturning and even newer to using a Bandsaw. After getting a
secondhand saw that needed repairs and quite a few parts to be bought and
made I finally got it going. I was so pleased with the results wondered why
I had not bought a bandsaw long time ago. Unfortunately in 15 minutes of
sawing I broke two of the four blades that came with the saw. The first
blade had done a couple of hours work with me. The second only part of a
cut. Not knowing how old the blades were, (they all seem fairly sharp) I
thought that if the life of a blade could stop so quickly I better find out
how to repair if possible.

The only thing wrong with this saw at the moment is that it only cuts 4". I
recon 6-8" would be MUCH better.

The idea of buying in bulk and "rolling your own" seems like a great idea!!
--
********************************
    ,-._|\         L. Peter Stacey
  /  Oz  \       Melbourne Australia

          v

 
 
 

Bandsaw blade

Post by Michael Quin-Conro » Fri, 28 Apr 2000 04:00:00


Hello Peter,
I wonder if the tension on your bandsaw was sufficient?
Or were the guides in proper position? Have you checked your User Manual?

I recently replaced my blade for the cost of Au$16.00 with a blade that cuts
metal as well and it is ? x 6 TPI. Far superior to the wood blades I had.

By the way you can rejoin them with silver solder or braising or you can
purchase a special tool that heats up the joint for you and holds it all
steady.

Regards
Michael Quin-Conroy
Stoneville
Western Australia



Quote:
> Thank you all for your replies.

> I am new to woodturning and even newer to using a Bandsaw. After getting a
> secondhand saw that needed repairs and quite a few parts to be bought and
> made I finally got it going. I was so pleased with the results wondered
why
> I had not bought a bandsaw long time ago. Unfortunately in 15 minutes of
> sawing I broke two of the four blades that came with the saw. The first
> blade had done a couple of hours work with me. The second only part of a
> cut. Not knowing how old the blades were, (they all seem fairly sharp) I
> thought that if the life of a blade could stop so quickly I better find
out
> how to repair if possible.

> The only thing wrong with this saw at the moment is that it only cuts 4".
I
> recon 6-8" would be MUCH better.

> The idea of buying in bulk and "rolling your own" seems like a great
idea!!
> --
> ********************************
>     ,-._|\         L. Peter Stacey
>   /  Oz  \       Melbourne Australia

>           v

 
 
 

Bandsaw blade

Post by Howard Kleppe » Fri, 28 Apr 2000 04:00:00


There's more to making a bandsaw blade than has been indicated by the
posts on this thread.  First off, the alignment must be perfect.
Without a jig special made for clamping the blade ends this is
difficult.  Next, this is a ***joint with a tiny surface area.  The
ends must be perfectly flat and square.  I'm told you can silver solder,
but I know no one who has done it.  Making a good weld is no easy
matter; without a welder made for the purpose you are very unlikely to
get a good weld.  Even with such a welder, it is not automatic; the weld
must be properly annealed or it will break.  I have bought blades from a
commercial saw works that broke at the weld very early on.  I now get my
blades from a friend (a turner who is also a skilled machinist) who has
a commercial bandsaw blade welder.  He told me it took some time and a
lot of broken blades before he learned to weld and anneal bandsaw blades
properly, even though he was an experienced welder.
 
 
 

Bandsaw blade

Post by cindy droz » Sat, 29 Apr 2000 04:00:00


I have been repairing and making bandsaw blades for years using silver
soldering. Even though my technique leaves a lot to be desired, I have
always gotten a usable result. I use a blade alignment jig that I made a
long time ago, but now they are available in the woodworking tool
catalogues. The type of solder is important, I use "easy flow 45" (other
45% silver content solders are good enough), and the flux is important,
use the blue stuff with the toxic whatever-it-is in it, it is better than
the "safe" stuff.

The joint that I use is a scarf joint of about 1/2" in length, made on the
grinder or belt sander. I take care to align the joint in the jig with no
space between the joint halves. Put flux between the joint halves. My
current favorite soldering method is to cut a 1/4" piece of solder and
place it on top of the joint, then heat slowly and evenly, trying to keep
from getting the blade red. The flux will boil, and then the solder will
flow. The joint can be cleaned up on the grinder after to get the excess
solder off.

This technique works to repair a broken blade. I have yet to see a blade
that broke at the weld, so that "guarantee" isn't enough. After a blade
breaks a few times, it is usually worn out and will continue to break.
Most of the time I am repairing a blade that I have abused. It also works
out that if I buy a coil of Starrett bandsaw blade from MSC, I am saving
enough to pay myself $20.00/hr to solder blades. It does require an
investment in blade stock...more $ than ordering 2 or 3 blades.

Especially since I have learned to sharpen my bandsaw blades, they are
often worth fixing. Like when its Sunday night, the job's due on Monday,
and it's the last blade on the rack...

-CD-
Boulder, CO

 
 
 

Bandsaw blade

Post by John Luca » Sat, 29 Apr 2000 04:00:00


Howard
    At the Tennessee Symposium last year Robert Vaughan showed us how to
silver solder a bandsaw blade.  You do have to make a jig to hold the
blade true. He grinds a taper on blade.  Basically he thins the blade on
both brocken ends so you will have a much larger soldering surface.  I
haven't tried it yet but he claims it works real well.  If it does break
it only takes a minute to fix once you've made a guide to hold and clamp
the blade.  John Lucas

 
 
 

Bandsaw blade

Post by James R. Johnso » Thu, 04 May 2000 04:00:00


Another method of soldering is to do as Cindy does, but instead of putting
the silver solder on top of the joint, flatten the solder with a clean
hammer on a clean surface, until it is about the same size as the scarf,
then put this very thin piece of solder between the ends of the blade, along
with the flux, then heat.  It seems to work well, as the heat doesn't have
to be as high or be applied as long, thereby ending up being kinder to the
blade.

If you fix a broken blade, the blade will end up shorter by the length of
the scarf joint, so if you fix the blade more than once, it may end up too
short to work.

James

Quote:

>Howard
>    At the Tennessee Symposium last year Robert Vaughan showed us how to
>silver solder a bandsaw blade.  You do have to make a jig to hold the
>blade true. He grinds a taper on blade.  Basically he thins the blade on
>both brocken ends so you will have a much larger soldering surface.  I
>haven't tried it yet but he claims it works real well.  If it does break
>it only takes a minute to fix once you've made a guide to hold and clamp
>the blade.  John Lucas