Vanity Sink...Turned?

Vanity Sink...Turned?

Post by Ted Sokolowsk » Mon, 10 Jul 2000 04:00:00



My wife has requested I turn a Vanity sink for her when I remodel the
bathroom next year. She got the idea from a pottery friend who made a sink
out of clay on a potters wheel.

I have made a dark room sink out of flake board and fiberglassed it. This
has worked for 15 years now (abused with acids and bases) and is still in
good condition.

I'd like to bounce some ideas around with the group as to how you would
finish it and what kind of wood would you use and whether this is a good
idea or bad.  I have some red oak blanks that are the perfect size for this
project.

I plan on turning it a standard size so that if it does crack or go bad in
any way I could replace it with a standard sink.

Any comments?

Ted Sokolowski
Scranton, PA

 
 
 

Vanity Sink...Turned?

Post by Ashling Ranc » Mon, 10 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Ted,

    I don't remember the site, but a couple of years ago when we were
planning the remodel, in the midst of which we still find ourselves, I
remember seeing a wooden bathtub and sinks  which were laminated,  I don't
know what they finished them with, however.

    Perhaps a marine grade spar varnish?

John Pickett
Llano, Texas


Quote:
>My wife has requested I turn a Vanity sink for her when I remodel the
>bathroom next year. She got the idea from a pottery friend who made a sink
>out of clay on a potters wheel.

>I have made a dark room sink out of flake board and fiberglassed it. This
>has worked for 15 years now (abused with acids and bases) and is still in
>good condition.

>I'd like to bounce some ideas around with the group as to how you would
>finish it and what kind of wood would you use and whether this is a good
>idea or bad.  I have some red oak blanks that are the perfect size for this
>project.

>I plan on turning it a standard size so that if it does crack or go bad in
>any way I could replace it with a standard sink.

>Any comments?

>Ted Sokolowski
>Scranton, PA


 
 
 

Vanity Sink...Turned?

Post by Derek Andrew » Mon, 10 Jul 2000 04:00:00


I would try an epoxy finish. There is an epoxy product that is designed
for restoring rotten wood. It is very thin and soaks right into the wood
and is formulated to work well with wood. I think this would be a good
base coat to start with, and perhaps you could finish with some of that
epoxy that is used for bar tops, the type that goes on real thick and
often has a coin embedded in it. My cocern with this type of surface
finish is that it must be elastic enough to move if the wood does.

If you want info on the first product, let me know and I will try to
find a reference.

Derek

Quote:

> >My wife has requested I turn a Vanity sink for her when I remodel the
> >bathroom next year. She got the idea from a pottery friend who made a sink
> >out of clay on a potters wheel.

> >I have made a dark room sink out of flake board and fiberglassed it. This
> >has worked for 15 years now (abused with acids and bases) and is still in
> >good condition.

> >I'd like to bounce some ideas around with the group as to how you would
> >finish it and what kind of wood would you use and whether this is a good
> >idea or bad.  I have some red oak blanks that are the perfect size for this
> >project.

> >I plan on turning it a standard size so that if it does crack or go bad in
> >any way I could replace it with a standard sink.

> >Any comments?

> >Ted Sokolowski
> >Scranton, PA

--
Derek Andrews
Sunrise Woodcrafts
http://www.sunrisewoodcrafts.ns.ca
*************************************************************
READ BY THE SEA
A one-day literary fair in River John village,
July 22: http://www.riverjohn.com/read_by_the_sea/
*************************************************************
 
 
 

Vanity Sink...Turned?

Post by mhorda » Mon, 10 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Our kitchen worktops and draining board are made from Iroko, a
Teak alternative/substitute. I've no reason to suppose this or
Teak itself wouldn't be suitable for a vanity sink. The problem
would be gluing up the planks to get the thickness you need.
Both timbers are naturally oily so some research into degreasing
the joints and appropriate adhesives would pay you back.
Our worktops get an occasional wipe over with boiled linseed oil
and often have standing water on them for some time with little
or no ill effect. For a sink you may want to try a more durable
surface just to protect the glue joints. Another timber that
comes to mind is Greenheart, used to be used for marine work but
I've no idea where you'd source it nowadays. Iroko and Teak are
both used for lab bench tops, you may find a source at timber
recyclers or reclamation yards.

-----------------------------------------------------------

Got questions?  Get answers over the phone at Keen.com.
Up to 100 minutes free!
http://www.keen.com

 
 
 

Vanity Sink...Turned?

Post by Mike & Donna McComb » Tue, 11 Jul 2000 04:00:00


"Ashling Ranch"  wrote ...

Quote:
> Ted,

>     I don't remember the site, but a couple of years ago when
we were
> planning the remodel, in the midst of which we still find
ourselves, I
> remember seeing a wooden bathtub and sinks  which were
laminated,  I don't
> know what they finished them with, however.

>     Perhaps a marine grade spar varnish?

Here is the link to the site.
http://www.pscraftsmanship.com/Wholesale/Image/nav.html

Since this topic first came up, I have done some experimenting
with epoxy as a finish. It is amazing stuff. It will wet sand to
a nice finish. You can get anything from a flat no gloss to a
very high gloss polished look with it. Does require some serious
elbow grease though. The finish is also repairable to a fair
degree.

My supplier has recently come up with a UV tolerant epoxy. I
haven't tried it yet, but was considering some segmented bird
baths with the stuff. This would basically be the same thing as a
sink, I guess. The epoxy finished would probably be less trouble
to maintain than the 'plastic' sinks that were popular in mobile
homes, a few years back.

Mike McCombs

 
 
 

Vanity Sink...Turned?

Post by Jim Go » Tue, 11 Jul 2000 04:00:00


<< My supplier has recently come up with a UV tolerant epoxy. I
haven't tried it yet, but was considering some segmented bird
baths with the stuff. >>

Hi, Mike

Could you give me the name of your supplier and the name of the UV tolerant
epoxy? I have a large slab of maple trunk cross-section I've been waiting to
finish into an outdoor tabletop, and it sounds like your epoxy would be
perfect.

TIA,
-Jim Gott

 
 
 

Vanity Sink...Turned?

Post by Donald R. Watlan » Tue, 11 Jul 2000 04:00:00


I have turned vases that will allow use of water for holding fresh flowers.
I use fiberglass (which is just a marine-grade epoxy) that is used for
boats.  I have built a wooden floored shower stall in the past, using the
same finish:  fiberglass.  It keeps boats afloat, it can handle all the
abuse you can dish out.  It's the same stuff they make bodies of Corvettes
out of.  A sink ought to be a piece of cake.  Look into West Systems brand
of marine products for a whole line of fiberglass.  Their site is:
http://www.westsystem.com/
Happy glassing,

--
Donald Watland
Watland Design


Quote:
> My wife has requested I turn a Vanity sink for her when I remodel the
> bathroom next year. She got the idea from a pottery friend who made a sink
> out of clay on a potters wheel.

> I have made a dark room sink out of flake board and fiberglassed it. This
> has worked for 15 years now (abused with acids and bases) and is still in
> good condition.

> I'd like to bounce some ideas around with the group as to how you would
> finish it and what kind of wood would you use and whether this is a good
> idea or bad.  I have some red oak blanks that are the perfect size for
this
> project.

> I plan on turning it a standard size so that if it does crack or go bad in
> any way I could replace it with a standard sink.

> Any comments?

> Ted Sokolowski
> Scranton, PA

 
 
 

Vanity Sink...Turned?

Post by Mike & Donna McComb » Tue, 11 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

> Hi, Mike

> Could you give me the name of your supplier and the name of the
UV tolerant
> epoxy? I have a large slab of maple trunk cross-section I've
been waiting to
> finish into an outdoor tabletop, and it sounds like your epoxy
would be
> perfect.

Whitaker Chemical, 407-656-0088,  in Florida. I have friends that
pour a lot of table slabs with their table top epoxy. We don't
yet have pricing on the product. The person we need to talk to
has been out of the office some lately.

Mike McCombs

 
 
 

Vanity Sink...Turned?

Post by Pierluigi Zezz » Tue, 11 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Ted Sokolowski scriveva:

Quote:
>My wife has requested I turn a Vanity sink for her when I remodel the
>bathroom next year.
...snipped
>I'd like to bounce some ideas around with the group as to how you would
>finish it and what kind of wood would you use and whether this is a good
>idea or bad.  I have some red oak blanks that are the perfect size for this
>project.

...snipped again

I've never done anything similar, so all I can give you is some guessing,
based on things I see around me. Namely: barrels and vats

Oak looks like a good choice: oak barrels are quite common. They are left
unfinished or ***d with raw line seed oil.
If you like a simple "frustum of cone" shape you could make a vat.
They are built with trapezoidal staves and have a bottom fitted in a groove
around the base (the small circle). The staves are not glued: they are kept
together with steel bands (circles) hammered toward the large part of the
cone. If the wood shrinks a bit you just tighten the circles.
One note: the circles are not cilindical: they match the conicity (?) of
the vat, so maybe you need the help of a blacksmith.

Most of the work wold be cutting the staves: trapezoids with long beveled
edges. The turning should be limited to smooth everything to round and
maybe cutting the groove for the bottom.

If you like the idea, make some research on segmented (staved) turning.
There are two "virtual communities" about this: one on deja.com, the other
at Yahoo.com. Their URLs should be:

http://www.FoundCollection.com/
http://www.FoundCollection.com/

It is a lot of time since I checked last time: they could have changed.

If you like to know more about vats and barrels I can ask my friend the
village carpenter (a fine cabinetmaker, in reality) who's been a cooper in
his youth (he's been a professional woodworker for 50 years!).

I Hope I could help you.

Pierluigi Zezza
Writing from Italy

 
 
 

Vanity Sink...Turned?

Post by Donald R. Watlan » Tue, 11 Jul 2000 04:00:00


One issue with staved oak barrels, as used by the wine and spirits industry,
is that they remain water-tight due to the fact that they are filled with
liquid, which causes the wood to swell and tighten against the steel bands.
If you let the wood dry out, no amount of tightening of the bands will
retain water until the wood soaks up moisture and swells again.  The ***
on the inside probably prevents any mold, but the damp outside of the barrel
often ends up with a layer of mold that blackens the wood, and turns to
"crude" over time.
--
Donald Watland
Watland Design


Quote:
> Ted Sokolowski scriveva:

> >My wife has requested I turn a Vanity sink for her when I remodel the
> >bathroom next year.
> ...snipped
> >I'd like to bounce some ideas around with the group as to how you would
> >finish it and what kind of wood would you use and whether this is a good
> >idea or bad.  I have some red oak blanks that are the perfect size for
this
> >project.
> ...snipped again

> I've never done anything similar, so all I can give you is some guessing,
> based on things I see around me. Namely: barrels and vats

> Oak looks like a good choice: oak barrels are quite common. They are left
> unfinished or ***d with raw line seed oil.
> If you like a simple "frustum of cone" shape you could make a vat.
> They are built with trapezoidal staves and have a bottom fitted in a
groove
> around the base (the small circle). The staves are not glued: they are
kept
> together with steel bands (circles) hammered toward the large part of the
> cone. If the wood shrinks a bit you just tighten the circles.
> One note: the circles are not cilindical: they match the conicity (?) of
> the vat, so maybe you need the help of a blacksmith.

> Most of the work wold be cutting the staves: trapezoids with long beveled
> edges. The turning should be limited to smooth everything to round and
> maybe cutting the groove for the bottom.

> If you like the idea, make some research on segmented (staved) turning.
> There are two "virtual communities" about this: one on deja.com, the other
> at Yahoo.com. Their URLs should be:

> http://www.FoundCollection.com/
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/

> It is a lot of time since I checked last time: they could have changed.

> If you like to know more about vats and barrels I can ask my friend the
> village carpenter (a fine cabinetmaker, in reality) who's been a cooper in
> his youth (he's been a professional woodworker for 50 years!).

> I Hope I could help you.

> Pierluigi Zezza
> Writing from Italy

 
 
 

Vanity Sink...Turned?

Post by Pierluigi Zezz » Thu, 13 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Donald R. Watland scriveva:

Quote:
>One issue with staved oak barrels, as used by the wine and spirits industry,
>is that they remain water-tight due to the fact that they are filled with
>liquid, which causes the wood to swell and tighten against the steel bands.
>If you let the wood dry out, no amount of tightening of the bands will
>retain water until the wood soaks up moisture and swells again.  The ***
>on the inside probably prevents any mold, but the damp outside of the barrel
>often ends up with a layer of mold that blackens the wood, and turns to
>"crude" over time.

Well, my idea was that the vat-sink will be finished, but I didn't write
it, relying on the group telepathy ;^)
Finishing should slow drying out: I am aware that barrels need to be damp
to be wine-tight (who cares about water!) but they do not need to be kept
full. Finishing should also keep mold at bay and allow water to flow away.
My simple minded guess was that the dampness of the bathroom and the finish
would have been enough to avoid drying. I now understand that this means
relying too much on the environment collaboration, though.
And, that's for sure, you want your bathroom to be more tidy than your
can***, where small spills and leaks are acceptable.

I still think that staved or laminated construction is a good alternative
to turning a big bowl from a big log.
Another route could be curved ply, using moulds or simply the
"super-flexible" grade of ply, but this wouldn't be woodturning.
I saw a very beautiful sink made with a single sheet of marine grade ply
curved like a wave (an open U coming to a flat part on a side) and closed
on front and rear with tempered glass set in a groove and caulked with
clear caulking material. The flat side was used as the table top of the
unit.

Pierluigi Zezza
Writing from Italy

 
 
 

Vanity Sink...Turned?

Post by Kailua-.. » Thu, 13 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Red oak would be okay but white oak would deffinately be better due to
it's closed cell structure which deters moisure absorbtion, unlike red
oak which will absorb moisture and stain black from the tannic acid in
the wood.  Boat builders alway prefered white oak to red oak for that
reason.   Teak wold probley be the ideal wood for a sink due to it's oil
content which made it the wood of choice for boat decks.  If you need to
laminate teak use Gorilla Glue, works great with oily teak.  Like boat
decks, wouldn't need or want to seal it with a plastic coating, just
wipe it down once a month with teak oil available from many paint
stores.
 
 
 

Vanity Sink...Turned?

Post by Tony Manell » Thu, 13 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Hi Ted,
Sounds like the perfect project for that new General 260.  Since you plan to
possibly change over to a purchased sink some time in the future size is a
consideration.  I looked at a Kohler catalog and they only have 2 sizes of
round sinks (I'm assuming you don't want to get into elliptical turning
: ) ) 19" and 13 5/8".  The 13 5/8" is pretty small for a sink.  You could
also plan on a square basin in the future and turn your round sink into a
larger square block of wood with a routed edge.  This would give you the
option of mounting the plumbing fixtures onto the bowl.  Kohler does make a
few "art" sinks which may be round, but I wouldn't consider these because
they cost $$$.  Don't forget to bring it for show and tell.  Good Luck.
Tony Manella


Quote:
> My wife has requested I turn a Vanity sink for her when I remodel the
> bathroom next year. She got the idea from a pottery friend who made a sink
> out of clay on a potters wheel.

> I have made a dark room sink out of flake board and fiberglassed it. This
> has worked for 15 years now (abused with acids and bases) and is still in
> good condition.

> I'd like to bounce some ideas around with the group as to how you would
> finish it and what kind of wood would you use and whether this is a good
> idea or bad.  I have some red oak blanks that are the perfect size for
this
> project.

> I plan on turning it a standard size so that if it does crack or go bad in
> any way I could replace it with a standard sink.

> Any comments?

> Ted Sokolowski
> Scranton, PA