sanding technique for natural edge bowls

sanding technique for natural edge bowls

Post by Don Dillo » Tue, 07 Nov 2000 04:00:00



Subject says it all.  do you do all the sanding on the lathe?  Is most of
it happening in your lap? Do you power sand while holding the bowl?
 
 
 

sanding technique for natural edge bowls

Post by Fred Holde » Tue, 07 Nov 2000 04:00:00


Hello Don,

I always power sand natural edge bowls, I want my hands as far away from those
rotating projections as possible. Yes, I do sand with the bowl on the lathe and
with the lathe running, but I make it a point to keep my hands away from the top
edges.

Fred Holder
<http://www.fholder.com/>


Quote:

>Subject says it all.  do you do all the sanding on the lathe?  Is most of
>it happening in your lap? Do you power sand while holding the bowl?

Fred Holder
<http://www.fholder.com/>

 
 
 

sanding technique for natural edge bowls

Post by Craig McCormic » Tue, 07 Nov 2000 04:00:00


Depends on the bowl - I use a combination of all these techniques.

Craig

Quote:
> Subject says it all.  do you do all the sanding on the lathe?  Is most of
> it happening in your lap? Do you power sand while holding the bowl?

 
 
 

sanding technique for natural edge bowls

Post by Georg » Wed, 08 Nov 2000 04:00:00


My wife can tell when I've been turning bark up by my barked knuckles.  I
use contrasting color backgrounds when turning, but I still let the shadow
catch me on the knuckles once in a while.

As to sanding, depends on the moisture content of the wood.  Low gets sanded
on the lathe, sometimes even while rotating, high moisture is a waste of
good sandpaper.  I let it dry and sand in my lap.  That way it doesn't clog
instantly, and I minimize the surprises caused by drying.

I use a flexible shaft and either power-loc or soft velcro pads as required,
though for lap sanding the hard discs can leave digs and burn marks too
easily, so I only use velcro or soft blocks.


Quote:
> I always power sand natural edge bowls, I want my hands as far away from
those
> rotating projections as possible. Yes, I do sand with the bowl on the
lathe and
> with the lathe running, but I make it a point to keep my hands away from
the top
> edges.

> >Subject says it all.  do you do all the sanding on the lathe?  Is most of
> >it happening in your lap? Do you power sand while holding the bowl?

 
 
 

sanding technique for natural edge bowls

Post by Rusty Myer » Wed, 08 Nov 2000 04:00:00


I either hand or power sand the lower part of the bowl on the lathe (lathe
running), but don't sand (or sand very little) the uneven part at the top.
I've found that I tend to feather the leading edge when I sand the top and
it makes the thickness look uneven.  Also tends to grab the sand paper,
whack your knuckles and sometime knock off bark.

rusty myers


Quote:
> Subject says it all.  do you do all the sanding on the lathe?  Is most of
> it happening in your lap? Do you power sand while holding the bowl?

 
 
 

sanding technique for natural edge bowls

Post by Peter Charles Fag » Wed, 08 Nov 2000 04:00:00


Don I do not know if it is available where you are but in the UK we can
get a multi-angled sanding disc holder that has a long handle for doing
just this sort of sanding job.  The discs are turned by the action of
the bowl, dish etc's surface and it is very effective.  It takes the
knocks instead of your knuckles and once mastered is a VERY effective
piece of weaponry.  In the November 2000 Woodturning Magazine on page
42 it can be seen under the name of Grip-a-disc Shear sanding tool.  I
am not connected just a happy user.
Regards Peter Charles Fagg.



Quote:
> Subject says it all.  do you do all the sanding on the lathe?  Is
most of
> it happening in your lap? Do you power sand while holding the bowl?

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.
 
 
 

sanding technique for natural edge bowls

Post by Bill Da » Wed, 08 Nov 2000 04:00:00


power sanding.....velcro on foam pads. I have a reversable lathe, and
that helps, as I can tilt the pad so the upper half 'drags' and
doesn't catch....the MAIN thing is that I sand much faster so the pad
feels more solid...but with a light touch...(1700 RPM usually)...then
with the lathe off, going back to the areas missed and cleaning
up....through most of the grits from 120 or so to 800...it's a very
slow process on some woods.... (I'm learning the advantages of
learning to do hollow forms, so I don't have to sand the
insides...*grin*)

One new trick is to use a Fein sander on the outside of 'problem'
pieces....being very careful to keep it moving and feathering in the
areas. I had a piece of Eastern Red Cedar with LOTS of swirls and
grain changes and natural edges that I don't think I could have gotten
right without the Fein....But most work is still done with power disks
and hand sanding the edges.

On Mon, 6 Nov 2000 16:36:10 -0800, "Don Dillon"

Quote:

>Subject says it all.  do you do all the sanding on the lathe?  Is most of
>it happening in your lap? Do you power sand while holding the bowl?

remove BALDERDASH for email reply
 
 
 

sanding technique for natural edge bowls

Post by dcook0 » Wed, 08 Nov 2000 04:00:00




Quote:
>Grip-a-disc Shear sanding tool.

Yep, have one on back order.  Has been for almost two months now and is
slated to arrive to the distributor the end of this month.  Reason for back
order?  This item is manufactured in the UK (as I understand it) and because
of the "petrol strikes" that were going on there for some time, the
manufacturer has not been able to ship out orders.  At least that's the
story I have.  hehe.  Anyway, I'm still looking forward to getting my hands
on this tool in order to save the knuckles and fingertips.

Dan Cook, St. Louis, MO
Where the polls are closed but it's too close to call.

 
 
 

sanding technique for natural edge bowls

Post by Lyn J. Mangiamel » Thu, 09 Nov 2000 10:24:54


Yes, the item Peter returns to is available in the US from Craft Supplies.
I like it a lot. The disks that come with it are unusually expensive,
although they work well.  Any 2 inch velcro sanding disk will work and are
particularly effective when used with one of the new velcro
backing/sandwich pads. Because the sanding disk can be rotated as much as
90 degrees to the handle, it can often get into deeper forms than the
typical power sanding unit. The Grip-A-Disk unit is much more handy for
interior work than the similar device sold by Packard.

Lyn

Quote:

> Don I do not know if it is available where you are but in the UK we can
> get a multi-angled sanding disc holder that has a long handle for doing
> just this sort of sanding job.  The discs are turned by the action of
> the bowl, dish etc's surface and it is very effective.  It takes the
> knocks instead of your knuckles and once mastered is a VERY effective
> piece of weaponry.  In the November 2000 Woodturning Magazine on page
> 42 it can be seen under the name of Grip-a-disc Shear sanding tool.  I
> am not connected just a happy user.
> Regards Peter Charles Fagg.



> > Subject says it all.  do you do all the sanding on the lathe?  Is
> most of
> > it happening in your lap? Do you power sand while holding the bowl?

> Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> Before you buy.

 
 
 

sanding technique for natural edge bowls

Post by Darrell Feltmat » Thu, 09 Nov 2000 04:00:00


Don

I power sand with the bowl on the lathe. Lathe speed about 600 and drill
speed about 1200. Lean the drill pad away from the tangent of rotation
so that you sand on the lower half of the disk. Practice on simple
natural edge bowls before doing the wierdies from burls.

I use a modified system of pads with velcro mounted onto 3M Roll Loc
disks for quick mount and reuse of cloth backed sanding pads. Also, I
like to sand from 80 to 2000 grit. I stop the lathe and apply Minwax
Tung oil before parting off.

God bless and safe turning
Darrell Feltmate

 
 
 

sanding technique for natural edge bowls

Post by Richard Prest » Thu, 09 Nov 2000 04:00:00


Hi George,
For your clogged sandpaper, try a steel brush, like for a barbeque. It removes
the grunge nicely. I've also read that using a piece of pvc will clean it also.
The brush allows me to start sanding while the wood is quite green, so I can
complete it sooner.

Quote:
>My wife can tell when I've been turning bark up by my barked knuckles.  I
>use contrasting color backgrounds when turning, but I still let the shadow
>catch me on the knuckles once in a while.

>As to sanding, depends on the moisture content of the wood.  Low gets sanded
>on the lathe, sometimes even while rotating, high moisture is a waste of
>good sandpaper.  I let it dry and sand in my lap.  That way it doesn't clog
>instantly, and I minimize the surprises caused by drying.

>I use a flexible shaft and either power-loc or soft velcro pads as required,
>though for lap sanding the hard discs can leave digs and burn marks too
>easily, so I only use velcro or soft blocks.



>> I always power sand natural edge bowls, I want my hands as far away from
>those
>> rotating projections as possible. Yes, I do sand with the bowl on the
>lathe and
>> with the lathe running, but I make it a point to keep my hands away from
>the top
>> edges.

>> >Subject says it all.  do you do all the sanding on the lathe?  Is most of
>> >it happening in your lap? Do you power sand while holding the bowl?

WoodTurners Anonymous of Richmond, Va, an AAW Chapter
 
 
 

sanding technique for natural edge bowls

Post by Peter Charles Fag » Thu, 09 Nov 2000 04:00:00


Dan when you receive your tool please come back to the group and tell
us of your experiences as a new user, I'm sure there are others who
would like to try but would benefit from the first hand experience.  Or
in this case your hand should be well out of the way.  It can be a
revelation because it is so unexpected that a friction driven item
should be so effective.  Regards Peter Charles Fagg.



Quote:



> >Grip-a-disc Shear sanding tool.

> Yep, have one on back order.  Has been for almost two months now and
is
> slated to arrive to the distributor the end of this month.  Reason
for back
> order?  This item is manufactured in the UK (as I understand it) and
because
> of the "petrol strikes" that were going on there for some time, the
> manufacturer has not been able to ship out orders.  At least that's
the
> story I have.  hehe.  Anyway, I'm still looking forward to getting my
hands
> on this tool in order to save the knuckles and fingertips.

> Dan Cook, St. Louis, MO
> Where the polls are closed but it's too close to call.

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.
 
 
 

sanding technique for natural edge bowls

Post by Georg » Thu, 09 Nov 2000 04:00:00


I use a file card. It works, but I tried on some of that *** boxelder with
some 100, and it was instant clog.  I decided to let it dry.  Good thing,
because the bark is like willow bark, and shrinks a good deal.  I'll want to
blend it a bit.


Quote:
> Hi George,
> For your clogged sandpaper, try a steel brush, like for a barbeque. It
removes
> the grunge nicely.

 
 
 

sanding technique for natural edge bowls

Post by Peter Hemsle » Thu, 09 Nov 2000 04:00:00


The discs referred to by Peter, to aid Don are in stock at The ToolPost,
though not yet on the website (www.toolpost.co.uk).  If Don, or anyone else

the details by email.  One of these days, I'll get time enough to put them
on the site.  Having just entered the details of several hundred new books
that should be on the site shortly, plus an extended Crown tools range
(including the PM tools), I'd reall ylike to take a bit of time off just to
do some turning.  P-l-e-a-s-e.

Regards,

Peter.

Quote:

>Don I do not know if it is available where you are but in the UK we can
>get a multi-angled sanding disc holder that has a long handle for doing
>just this sort of sanding job.  The discs are turned by the action of
>the bowl, dish etc's surface and it is very effective.  It takes the
>knocks instead of your knuckles and once mastered is a VERY effective
>piece of weaponry.  In the November 2000 Woodturning Magazine on page
>42 it can be seen under the name of Grip-a-disc Shear sanding tool.  I
>am not connected just a happy user.
>Regards Peter Charles Fagg.