Oneway Stronghold Vs Super Nova?

Oneway Stronghold Vs Super Nova?

Post by George Mun » Mon, 27 Nov 2000 04:00:00



Hello All,
        I am about to buy my first chuck. I have narrowed it down to the
Stronghold or the Nova. The Stronghold I can drive to the store and buy
for $319 Can, the Nova is $220 Can by mail-order. Apart from the price,
do the members of this news group have any advice or preference

BTW Thanks to all who answered my posting about the old Rockwell/Beaver
lathe.
Thanks,
--
George R Munn.
Red Deer.
Alberta.

 
 
 

Oneway Stronghold Vs Super Nova?

Post by Georg » Mon, 27 Nov 2000 04:00:00


My regular Novas are fine for my 12" capacity lathe.  Just picked up the pin
jaws for 'em yesterday evening, so I've only turned one piece with them, but
I use 2",1" and Cole jaws all the time.  The new jaws work well, and should
overcome the one problem I have with the pin chuck - soft woods sometime eat
the pin and then rotate freely.

I'm sure you'll hear how much better the Oneway is, and maybe it is, but I'm
not sure how.

How's $215 CDN with insert and two sets of jaws?  I've got two standard, and
I'm tempted....
http://www.kmstools.com/


Quote:
> I am about to buy my first chuck. I have narrowed it down to the
> Stronghold or the Nova. The Stronghold I can drive to the store and buy
> for $319 Can, the Nova is $220 Can by mail-order. Apart from the price,
> do the members of this news group have any advice or preference


 
 
 

Oneway Stronghold Vs Super Nova?

Post by Jim Go » Mon, 27 Nov 2000 04:00:00


<< Subject: Oneway Stronghold Vs Super Nova?

Date: Sun, Nov 26, 2000 7:35 AM

Hello All,
        I am about to buy my first chuck. I have narrowed it down to the
Stronghold or the Nova. The Stronghold I can drive to the store and buy
for $319 Can, the Nova is $220 Can by mail-order. Apart from the price,
do the members of this news group have any advice or preference

BTW Thanks to all who answered my posting about the old Rockwell/Beaver
lathe.
Thanks,
--
George R Munn. >>

Hi, George

Why not get the Vicmarc VM 100 or VM 120 direct from Australia at significant
savings? The VM 100 (3 1/2" key-operated) is only $182.867 CAD, and the VM 120
(5 1/2" key-operated) is only $234.534 CAD.
If you're comparing like sizes, the VM 120 is closer in capacity to the
Stronghold, and has many more accessory jaws available than the Stronghold.
A good friend of mine swore by the Stronghold for a long time, but after seeing
my Vicmarc and hearing about this new source he ordered a VM 120 for the
reasons I just described. It's a great chuck that will last you a lifetime.
Check out www.woodturning.com.au for this site. Go to "shopping" and then to
"woodturning accessories" to find the chucks. They also have turning tools.
This is all possible because of the exchange rate of the Australian dollar as
it compares to other countries.
I live in California, and the exchange rate is even more favorable for me, but
I think it's still a good deal for you. The friend I spoke of is the third of
three of my friends who have gotten their chucks this way, and they're all
pleased with this company.
By the way, this company also has the Supernova, which is less expensive than
the VM 100, ($164.907 CAD) but I've used the Supernova and I consider the
Vicmarc of either size to be head and shoulders above the Supernova in quality.

Good luck with your shopping.

-Jim Gott

 
 
 

Oneway Stronghold Vs Super Nova?

Post by Bill Brachho » Tue, 28 Nov 2000 11:41:13


George,

I happen to own both of these chucks, plus the Vicmarc 3 1/2".  I bought
the Stronghold last and wished now that it was the first chuck I bought.  
As its name implies, is hold is truly STRONG.  I routinely hollow out 10-
14" bowls, gripping on only a 1/4" long tenon of max diameter (about 3
1/2").  I really horse the gouge doing roughouts and have yet to pop a
blank out of the chuck (but, I sure that I will some day !!).  The
Stronghold #3 jaws have fine, concentric "rings" on the inside that really
grip well, by biting into a lot of wood.

Bill in N Florida


Quote:
>Hello All,
>     I am about to buy my first chuck. I have narrowed it down to the
>Stronghold or the Nova. The Stronghold I can drive to the store and buy
>for $319 Can, the Nova is $220 Can by mail-order. Apart from the price,
>do the members of this news group have any advice or preference

>BTW Thanks to all who answered my posting about the old Rockwell/Beaver
>lathe.
>Thanks,

 
 
 

Oneway Stronghold Vs Super Nova?

Post by Mike » Tue, 28 Nov 2000 04:00:00


I have a Nova and a SuperNova. I've never had a problem with either of them.
They do everything I ask.


Quote:
> Hello All,
> I am about to buy my first chuck. I have narrowed it down to the
> Stronghold or the Nova. The Stronghold I can drive to the store and buy
> for $319 Can, the Nova is $220 Can by mail-order. Apart from the price,
> do the members of this news group have any advice or preference

> BTW Thanks to all who answered my posting about the old Rockwell/Beaver
> lathe.
> Thanks,
> --
> George R Munn.
> Red Deer.
> Alberta.


 
 
 

Oneway Stronghold Vs Super Nova?

Post by Aaron » Tue, 28 Nov 2000 04:00:00


George -

I own a Stronghold. Use it on a Jet mini quite often, have used it on my old
Sears clunker  (my first lathe) and now also use it on a standard size
Delta. Have also used it for demonstrating on Powermatic and ShopSmith
lathes. Wonderful chuck. Well made, versatile, excellent choice. With
different inserts ($18 ea) you can go from one spindle size to another with
no compromise in accuracy or usefulness.
I've also used the Supernova for Woodcraft store demos on Nova lathes. It is
clearly not as user friendly as the Stronghold, plus it's tolerances were
not as good, thus there were problems with runout and vibration, most
noticeable when working on the fit for Raffan-style boxes.
I've not used a Vicmarc. But of the two I discussed, go Stronghold if you
buy at all.

--
Aaron

 
 
 

Oneway Stronghold Vs Super Nova?

Post by Jon Schillin » Wed, 29 Nov 2000 04:00:00


George,
As others have said, you really are comparing the Corolla against the Benz!
You have to decide three questions:
What are you going to be turning (size and form)?
Are you in this turning game for the long haul?
How much can your budget stand?
.............
Good turning can be done with both chucks.
Good turning can also be done with faceplates and glue blocks.   Some will
argue that
more stable turning base is found with using the faceplate.    Using the
faceplate can require a bit more effort
to turn and shape the base, and on larger items the extra effort is worth
it.
If you buy the Super Nova you have money left over for maybe a new grinding
wheel, 60 grit from Norton,
or maybe a .5" super fluted bowl gouge from any of the major manufacturers.
If you stayed with faceplates, you have a whole lot more money to use for
other turning items.
...........
Frankly, the Talon chuck is a mighty fine chuck too, as are others
mentioned.
Regards,
--
Jon Schilling, Ridgefield, Wa.

Quote:
> George -

> I own a Stronghold. Use it on a Jet mini quite often, have used it on my
old
> Sears clunker  (my first lathe) and now also use it on a standard size
> Delta. Have also used it for demonstrating on Powermatic and ShopSmith
> lathes. Wonderful chuck. Well made, versatile, excellent choice. With
> different inserts ($18 ea) you can go from one spindle size to another
with
> no compromise in accuracy or usefulness.
> I've also used the Supernova for Woodcraft store demos on Nova lathes. It
is
> clearly not as user friendly as the Stronghold, plus it's tolerances were
> not as good, thus there were problems with runout and vibration, most
> noticeable when working on the fit for Raffan-style boxes.
> I've not used a Vicmarc. But of the two I discussed, go Stronghold if you
> buy at all.

> --
> Aaron

 
 
 

Oneway Stronghold Vs Super Nova?

Post by John Luca » Thu, 30 Nov 2000 04:00:00


George
    I haven't seen anyone mention the Talon chuck by Oneway.  I used one
all weekend and it is much stronger than my Nova.  I don't have the
Super Nova so I can't talk about that.  I got much less vibration from
the piece it's easier to tighten.  John LUcas