sharpening bandsaw blades

sharpening bandsaw blades

Post by cindy droz » Fri, 14 Apr 2000 04:00:00



Hi Everyone,

I tried the bandsaw blade sharpening method described on this group:  
remounting the blade upside down, and holding a sharpening stone to the
teeth while the saw was running. On the 1/2" wide, 3tpi blades I was very
impressed with the results! A great idea, thank you! I would encourage all
of the other skeptics to try it. On the 1/4" wide, 6tpi blades I was not
satisfied, and continue to consider those blades disposable.

The last few sharpenings I just opened the top wheel housing and turned
the wheel backwards by hand. This got me the same sharpening results with
less tendency to oversharpen. It is slower, but not having to remount the
blade made it a net time savings.

I used a soft Arkansas stone, and moved the stone while turning the wheel,
to minimize grooving of the stone. The stone will still have to be
flattened occasionally. Is another type of stone better?

-CD-
Boulder, CO

 
 
 

sharpening bandsaw blades

Post by Howar » Sat, 15 Apr 2000 04:00:00


cindy:

For reasons I gave a few weeks ago, I don't favor this method (changes
the geometry of the cutting edge and does not last long), but if it's
working for you, great.  I suggest a synthetic carborundum (aluminum
oxide) stone.  You don't need to go as fine as even a soft arkansas.  A
combination "India" stone will work.  I use the coarse side of mine to
round the back edge of my bandsaw blades.  The fine side is plenty fine
for the teeth.

 
 
 

sharpening bandsaw blades

Post by Terry Vaugha » Sat, 15 Apr 2000 04:00:00




Quote:
>Hi Everyone,

>I tried the bandsaw blade sharpening method described on this group:  
>remounting the blade upside down, and holding a sharpening stone to the
>teeth while the saw was running. On the 1/2" wide, 3tpi blades I was very
>impressed with the results! A great idea, thank you! I would encourage all
>of the other skeptics to try it. On the 1/4" wide, 6tpi blades I was not
>satisfied, and continue to consider those blades disposable.

>The last few sharpenings I just opened the top wheel housing and turned
>the wheel backwards by hand. This got me the same sharpening results with
>less tendency to oversharpen. It is slower, but not having to remount the
>blade made it a net time savings.

>I used a soft Arkansas stone, and moved the stone while turning the wheel,
>to minimize grooving of the stone. The stone will still have to be
>flattened occasionally. Is another type of stone better?

>-CD-
>Boulder, CO

-- This baffles me.  When the idea was first posted I gave it a try, following
the instructions carefully.  The result was a blade more blunt than any I have
ever used.  This didn't surprise me as hitting a stone with the saw seems
certain to blunt it.  But the messages say it works.  What did I do wrong?  Do
you rest the stone on the saw table or hold it freehand to let it move on each
tooth (sounds dangerous)

Terry

 
 
 

sharpening bandsaw blades

Post by Donald R. Watlan » Sat, 15 Apr 2000 04:00:00



Quote:
> Hi Everyone,

> I tried the bandsaw blade sharpening method described on this group:
> remounting the blade upside down, and holding a sharpening stone to the
> teeth while the saw was running. On the 1/2" wide, 3tpi blades I was very
> impressed with the results! A great idea, thank you! I would encourage all
> of the other skeptics to try it. On the 1/4" wide, 6tpi blades I was not
> satisfied, and continue to consider those blades disposable.

I buy "Timberwolf" brand blades for my 14" Delta bandsaw for something on
the order of $12-14.  These come incredibly sharp, and given that I don't
saw a bunch of dirt-laden burls, last a long, long time.  I can't imagine
needing to resharpen blades by the above means.  Normally, large, meaty
bandsaw
blades which are worth resharpening, are done the same way as are chainsaw
blades, by running them through a grinding process which grinds each tooth
from within the gullet at the same angle, then through a second process that
sets each tooth to a set angle.  Your method not only grinds the wrong side
of the tooth, but tends to remove the set from the teeth as well.  But for
$12, and the length of time a good blade lasts ... how tight a budget are
you running on, and how much of a true benefit are you getting?  After a
certain amount of use, the blades not only
become dull, but the blade gets local twists in it, it stretches, and looses
the ability to track accurately.

-DW

 
 
 

sharpening bandsaw blades

Post by Mike Pauls » Thu, 20 Apr 2000 04:00:00


Quote:
>>Your method not only grinds the wrong side
>>of the tooth, but tends to remove the set from the teeth as well

Yeah, but it works.  And it's fast.  I'm sure it's better to do a proper
job of sharpening or buy a new blade, but even grinding one tooth at a
time with my Dremel gets me back into production faster than either of
those options.  The price of blades goes up when you have a bigger saw,
and if you use it a lot, that can add up to some serious change in a
year's time.  I, too, use Timberwolf blades.  I just got some new ones
this week.  They were $18.50 apiece including shipping in the size I use.
They have a wide set and deep gullets which makes them especially suitable
for repeated sharpenings.  I sharpen mine over and over until metal
fatigue sets in and the band develops cracks.  I wouldn't dream of
throwing away a chainsaw blade or a bowl gouge just because it got
dull, and it seems foolish to throw away a perfectly good bandsaw blade
when it can easily be sharpened by any of several methods posted here.

best wishes,    -mike paulson, fort collins, co

 
 
 

sharpening bandsaw blades

Post by Steven D. Russel » Thu, 20 Apr 2000 04:00:00


Hello Mike,

Ditto on your post. I still have not tried the "upside down" sharpening
method on my dull fine tooth bands yet, but I plan to. As for the 3TPI
bands, I continue to sharpen them with my Dremel tool, according to the
procedure I posted some time ago.

Timberwolf bands for my bandsaw cost $22.00 - $25.00 each. I can toast
the blade in as little as two days when resawing or, if I'm resawing
Lignum Vitae, in just one day. If I replaced the band every time it got
dull, I would consume a minimum of ten bands per month. At $25.00 or so
a pop, that amounts to at least $3,000 per year on band replacement
costs.

Instead, I sharpen the bands myself and save $225.00 per month or $2,700
per year. I can usually get ten sharpenings out of a band before I pitch

$25.00 or $300.00 per year). My Dremel sharpening method sharpens each
tooth individually according to its preset angle. The resulting edge
quality is very good and it takes just a few minutes.

Yes, I can take the dull band to a professional sharpening service and
pay 85% of the cost of a new band (plus tax) to get it sharpened again.
:-0 The edge will be as good as the day it was new, but two or three
days later, I would have to make the 75 mile round trip into town and do
it all over again. Since I turn for a living and do not get paid to
drive back and forth from town, I will continue to sharpen them myself.

Just think, in two years I saved enough in band replacement costs to buy
my Oneway 2436-3. That's not too shabby in my book! :-) Take care and
all the best to you and yours!
--
Letting the chips fly...
Steven D. Russell
Eurowood Werks Woodturning Studio
The Woodlands, Texas

Quote:

> >>Your method not only grinds the wrong side
> >>of the tooth, but tends to remove the set from the teeth as well

> Yeah, but it works.  And it's fast.  I'm sure it's better to do a proper
> job of sharpening or buy a new blade, but even grinding one tooth at a
> time with my Dremel gets me back into production faster than either of
> those options.  The price of blades goes up when you have a bigger saw,
> and if you use it a lot, that can add up to some serious change in a
> year's time.  I, too, use Timberwolf blades.  I just got some new ones
> this week.  They were $18.50 apiece including shipping in the size I use.
> They have a wide set and deep gullets which makes them especially suitable
> for repeated sharpenings.  I sharpen mine over and over until metal
> fatigue sets in and the band develops cracks.  I wouldn't dream of
> throwing away a chainsaw blade or a bowl gouge just because it got
> dull, and it seems foolish to throw away a perfectly good bandsaw blade
> when it can easily be sharpened by any of several methods posted here.

> best wishes,    -mike paulson, fort collins, co

 
 
 

sharpening bandsaw blades

Post by Ken Bulloc » Thu, 20 Apr 2000 04:00:00


I have to say I thought that this upside down sharpening idea was a load of
hog wash when I read it. I am glad I didn't say anything.

When I went to the shop the next day, I decided to try it. After all the
dull blade was still on the band saw from last week when I was cutting out
salad servers and quit because the blade was totally dull and I would have
to wait until I went into town and buy a new one.

So, I said what the heck, Took a chainsaw file as I was too lazy to go out
to the truck for the tool box. I held the file agianst the front of the
tooth of the blade and turned it back wards by hand. I let it go completely
around twice.

When I turned on the saw and cut into a 4 inch thick piece of kiln dried
rock maple and it cut like it was brand new, I was convinced.

So, Thank you to who ever thought this little trick up. I figure it will
save me hundreds a years if not more..

--
Please, visit our web site at www.oneofakindwoodturnings.com

Click here to recommend my site to your friends and help me promote it.
<http://www.recommend-it.com/l.z.e?s=618961>

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http://www.alladvantage.com/go.asp?refid=LSW434


Quote:
> Hello Mike,

> Ditto on your post. I still have not tried the "upside down" sharpening
> method on my dull fine tooth bands yet, but I plan to. As for the 3TPI
> bands, I continue to sharpen them with my Dremel tool, according to the
> procedure I posted some time ago.

> Timberwolf bands for my bandsaw cost $22.00 - $25.00 each. I can toast
> the blade in as little as two days when resawing or, if I'm resawing
> Lignum Vitae, in just one day. If I replaced the band every time it got
> dull, I would consume a minimum of ten bands per month. At $25.00 or so
> a pop, that amounts to at least $3,000 per year on band replacement
> costs.

> Instead, I sharpen the bands myself and save $225.00 per month or $2,700
> per year. I can usually get ten sharpenings out of a band before I pitch

> $25.00 or $300.00 per year). My Dremel sharpening method sharpens each
> tooth individually according to its preset angle. The resulting edge
> quality is very good and it takes just a few minutes.

> Yes, I can take the dull band to a professional sharpening service and
> pay 85% of the cost of a new band (plus tax) to get it sharpened again.
> :-0 The edge will be as good as the day it was new, but two or three
> days later, I would have to make the 75 mile round trip into town and do
> it all over again. Since I turn for a living and do not get paid to
> drive back and forth from town, I will continue to sharpen them myself.

> Just think, in two years I saved enough in band replacement costs to buy
> my Oneway 2436-3. That's not too shabby in my book! :-) Take care and
> all the best to you and yours!
> --
> Letting the chips fly...
> Steven D. Russell
> Eurowood Werks Woodturning Studio
> The Woodlands, Texas


> > >>Your method not only grinds the wrong side
> > >>of the tooth, but tends to remove the set from the teeth as well

> > Yeah, but it works.  And it's fast.  I'm sure it's better to do a proper
> > job of sharpening or buy a new blade, but even grinding one tooth at a
> > time with my Dremel gets me back into production faster than either of
> > those options.  The price of blades goes up when you have a bigger saw,
> > and if you use it a lot, that can add up to some serious change in a
> > year's time.  I, too, use Timberwolf blades.  I just got some new ones
> > this week.  They were $18.50 apiece including shipping in the size I
use.
> > They have a wide set and deep gullets which makes them especially
suitable
> > for repeated sharpenings.  I sharpen mine over and over until metal
> > fatigue sets in and the band develops cracks.  I wouldn't dream of
> > throwing away a chainsaw blade or a bowl gouge just because it got
> > dull, and it seems foolish to throw away a perfectly good bandsaw blade
> > when it can easily be sharpened by any of several methods posted here.

> > best wishes,    -mike paulson, fort collins, co