New lighting, with a twist!

New lighting, with a twist!

Post by Steve Wolf » Tue, 19 Aug 2003 10:44:41



   A few months ago, they did some remodelling in our office building, so
there were stacks of fluorescent light fixtures laying around.  A few weeks
ago, I mentioned to the building manager that I was tempted to take some of
them home for my workshop.  He took me back to a closet, found 4 of them,
said they were extras, and let me take them for free!  Well, of course, I
couldn't turn him down.  3 4' T8's in each one, high-power factor,
commercial-rated high frequency electronic ballasts, and very nice fixtures
and reflectors.

  Yesterday, I got out the 16' ladder to reach the ceiling, mounted the
lights, wired them in, and turned them on.  Nothing.  Well, OK, a little
flicker, but that's it.  My heart sank.  I pulled one down, took apart the
fixture to look at the ballasts, and wouldn't you know it, they're 220-volt
ballasts.  Ah, shucks.

  Well, everything DID turn out alright, because I have a subpanel in the
shop that makes wiring easier, so I picked up a new 2-pole breaker and
2-pole switch.  Paying $8 for a simple switch was a little excessive, I
thought, but hey - after the $15 I spent on the breaker and switch, I still
came out way ahead of having to pay for new lights!

  Here's the funny part:  After adding 400 watts of light to the shop, I
expected it to look VERy bright - but it really doesn't!  The high-quality
reflectors do a terrific job of foxusing the light downward, and don't let
it shine all over like a shop-light.  So, whereas a shoplight has light
hitting you directly in the eyeballs, making it LOOK bright, these don't,
which makes them *appear* not to be as bright.  All of the light hits
surfaces, and THEN your eyeballs (well, unless you're looking straight up),
so while it doesn't look terribly bright, everything is VERY
well-illuminated.  While it is very easy on the eyes, it is somewhat
disappointing to add 400 watts of light, and not be able to say "Holy cow,
that's bright!"

steve

 
 
 

New lighting, with a twist!

Post by D K Wood » Tue, 19 Aug 2003 10:57:00


Quote:

>    A few months ago, they did some remodelling in our office building, so
> there were stacks of fluorescent light fixtures laying around.  A few weeks
> ago, I mentioned to the building manager that I was tempted to take some of
> them home for my workshop.  He took me back to a closet, found 4 of them,
> said they were extras, and let me take them for free!  
> <snip>
>   Here's the funny part:  After adding 400 watts of light to the shop, I
> expected it to look VERy bright - but it really doesn't!  The high-quality
> reflectors do a terrific job of foxusing the light downward, and don't let
> it shine all over like a shop-light.  <snip>
> steve

Wow, what a deal!  :)

I would think a disadvantage of such focused light would be more shadows.
Is this the case, and does it ever get distracting?

david
--
"We have money to blow up bridges over the Tigress and Euphrates and we
don't have money to build bridges in our major cities.  We have money to
destroy the health of the Iraqi people and we don't have enough money to
repair the health of our own people in this country."
           -- Rep. Dennis Kucinich

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New lighting, with a twist!

Post by Steve Wolf » Tue, 19 Aug 2003 11:13:01


Quote:
> I would think a disadvantage of such focused light would be more shadows.
> Is this the case, and does it ever get distracting?

   I haven't really noticed shadows.  The lights are still pretty high above
the floor, and there are shoplights mixed in, so there's a lot of light
sources scattering light all over the place.  It ends up pretty even.  I
feel purty lucky!

   However, one of the reasons I've wanted more light was so when I work the
inside of a deepish piece, I won't need as much supplementary light - I've
been pointing a 500-watt halogen worklight inside the piece.  I don't think
this will alleviate that need, but even with more scattered light from
above, I probably still wouldn't.  Having that much light shining INSIDE of
the piece is hard to compete with when the light is coming from above!

steve

 
 
 

New lighting, with a twist!

Post by D K Wood » Tue, 19 Aug 2003 13:50:25


Quote:

>    However, one of the reasons I've wanted more light was so when I work the
> inside of a deepish piece, I won't need as much supplementary light - I've
> been pointing a 500-watt halogen worklight inside the piece.  I don't think
> this will alleviate that need, but even with more scattered light from
> above, I probably still wouldn't.  Having that much light shining INSIDE of
> the piece is hard to compete with when the light is coming from above!

> steve

I don't have any experience with it, but what about putting an actual light
source into the piece?

http://www.ahernstore.com/sp1022white.html

it's basically a bright light at the end of a thin gooseneck -- think
snakelite with an eating disorder.  As long as you're not working with a
really thin mouth, it might help?

david
--
"We have money to blow up bridges over the Tigress and Euphrates and we
don't have money to build bridges in our major cities.  We have money to
destroy the health of the Iraqi people and we don't have enough money to
repair the health of our own people in this country."
           -- Rep. Dennis Kucinich

-----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =-----
http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World!
-----==  Over 100,000 Newsgroups - 19 Different Servers! =-----

 
 
 

New lighting, with a twist!

Post by Steve Wolf » Tue, 19 Aug 2003 15:52:44


Quote:
> I don't have any experience with it, but what about putting an actual
light
> source into the piece?

> http://www.ahernstore.com/sp1022white.html

> it's basically a bright light at the end of a thin gooseneck -- think
> snakelite with an eating disorder.  As long as you're not working with a
> really thin mouth, it might help?

  For items with relatively hollow necks, that would be terrific.  For
things that are more open, the worklight does pretty well. : )

steve

 
 
 

New lighting, with a twist!

Post by EnDuCe » Sat, 23 Aug 2003 08:35:27


Office buildings commonly use 220volt as well as 347volt fixtures for
continuous row mounting to save power, ohms law can show you that a 40watt
bulb draws alot less then 120volts and even less at 347volts, but this only
proves worthwhile when ALOT of fixtures are in use

But like you said, free fixtures vs 35bucks for a switch and 2pole breaker
stills is cheaper!


Quote:

>    A few months ago, they did some remodelling in our office building, so
> there were stacks of fluorescent light fixtures laying around.  A few
weeks
> ago, I mentioned to the building manager that I was tempted to take some
of
> them home for my workshop.  He took me back to a closet, found 4 of them,
> said they were extras, and let me take them for free!  Well, of course, I
> couldn't turn him down.  3 4' T8's in each one, high-power factor,
> commercial-rated high frequency electronic ballasts, and very nice
fixtures
> and reflectors.

>   Yesterday, I got out the 16' ladder to reach the ceiling, mounted the
> lights, wired them in, and turned them on.  Nothing.  Well, OK, a little
> flicker, but that's it.  My heart sank.  I pulled one down, took apart the
> fixture to look at the ballasts, and wouldn't you know it, they're
220-volt
> ballasts.  Ah, shucks.

>   Well, everything DID turn out alright, because I have a subpanel in the
> shop that makes wiring easier, so I picked up a new 2-pole breaker and
> 2-pole switch.  Paying $8 for a simple switch was a little excessive, I
> thought, but hey - after the $15 I spent on the breaker and switch, I
still
> came out way ahead of having to pay for new lights!

>   Here's the funny part:  After adding 400 watts of light to the shop, I
> expected it to look VERy bright - but it really doesn't!  The high-quality
> reflectors do a terrific job of foxusing the light downward, and don't let
> it shine all over like a shop-light.  So, whereas a shoplight has light
> hitting you directly in the eyeballs, making it LOOK bright, these don't,
> which makes them *appear* not to be as bright.  All of the light hits
> surfaces, and THEN your eyeballs (well, unless you're looking straight
up),
> so while it doesn't look terribly bright, everything is VERY
> well-illuminated.  While it is very easy on the eyes, it is somewhat
> disappointing to add 400 watts of light, and not be able to say "Holy cow,
> that's bright!"

> steve

 
 
 

New lighting, with a twist!

Post by <a.. » Sun, 24 Aug 2003 13:22:58


Over the years I've had a peice fly-off at high velocity obliterating
florescents at least twice.  When one of those kinds of bulbs break it takes
forever to finally get all the tiny shards.
Good luck


Quote:

>    A few months ago, they did some remodelling in our office building, so
> there were stacks of fluorescent light fixtures laying around.  A few
weeks
> ago, I mentioned to the building manager that I was tempted to take some
of
> them home for my workshop.  He took me back to a closet, found 4 of them,
> said they were extras, and let me take them for free!  Well, of course, I
> couldn't turn him down.  3 4' T8's in each one, high-power factor,
> commercial-rated high frequency electronic ballasts, and very nice
fixtures
> and reflectors.

>   Yesterday, I got out the 16' ladder to reach the ceiling, mounted the
> lights, wired them in, and turned them on.  Nothing.  Well, OK, a little
> flicker, but that's it.  My heart sank.  I pulled one down, took apart the
> fixture to look at the ballasts, and wouldn't you know it, they're
220-volt
> ballasts.  Ah, shucks.

>   Well, everything DID turn out alright, because I have a subpanel in the
> shop that makes wiring easier, so I picked up a new 2-pole breaker and
> 2-pole switch.  Paying $8 for a simple switch was a little excessive, I
> thought, but hey - after the $15 I spent on the breaker and switch, I
still
> came out way ahead of having to pay for new lights!

>   Here's the funny part:  After adding 400 watts of light to the shop, I
> expected it to look VERy bright - but it really doesn't!  The high-quality
> reflectors do a terrific job of foxusing the light downward, and don't let
> it shine all over like a shop-light.  So, whereas a shoplight has light
> hitting you directly in the eyeballs, making it LOOK bright, these don't,
> which makes them *appear* not to be as bright.  All of the light hits
> surfaces, and THEN your eyeballs (well, unless you're looking straight
up),
> so while it doesn't look terribly bright, everything is VERY
> well-illuminated.  While it is very easy on the eyes, it is somewhat
> disappointing to add 400 watts of light, and not be able to say "Holy cow,
> that's bright!"

> steve

 
 
 

New lighting, with a twist!

Post by James Barle » Sun, 24 Aug 2003 16:10:17


That's odd, I've also been turning for years, but have yet to break my first
florescent light, then again, I've never had a piece fly off my lathe at
"high velocity" either.
I sort of feel like I've missed out on all the e***ment some how.

James Barley.
www.members.shaw.ca/jbarley


Quote:
> Over the years I've had a peice fly-off at high velocity obliterating
> florescents at least twice.  When one of those kinds of bulbs break it
takes
> forever to finally get all the tiny shards.
> Good luck



> >    A few months ago, they did some remodelling in our office building,
so
> > there were stacks of fluorescent light fixtures laying around.  A few
> weeks
> > ago, I mentioned to the building manager that I was tempted to take some
> of
> > them home for my workshop.  He took me back to a closet, found 4 of
them,
> > said they were extras, and let me take them for free!  Well, of course,
I
> > couldn't turn him down.  3 4' T8's in each one, high-power factor,
> > commercial-rated high frequency electronic ballasts, and very nice
> fixtures
> > and reflectors.

> >   Yesterday, I got out the 16' ladder to reach the ceiling, mounted the
> > lights, wired them in, and turned them on.  Nothing.  Well, OK, a little
> > flicker, but that's it.  My heart sank.  I pulled one down, took apart
the
> > fixture to look at the ballasts, and wouldn't you know it, they're
> 220-volt
> > ballasts.  Ah, shucks.

> >   Well, everything DID turn out alright, because I have a subpanel in
the
> > shop that makes wiring easier, so I picked up a new 2-pole breaker and
> > 2-pole switch.  Paying $8 for a simple switch was a little excessive, I
> > thought, but hey - after the $15 I spent on the breaker and switch, I
> still
> > came out way ahead of having to pay for new lights!

> >   Here's the funny part:  After adding 400 watts of light to the shop, I
> > expected it to look VERy bright - but it really doesn't!  The
high-quality
> > reflectors do a terrific job of foxusing the light downward, and don't
let
> > it shine all over like a shop-light.  So, whereas a shoplight has light
> > hitting you directly in the eyeballs, making it LOOK bright, these
don't,
> > which makes them *appear* not to be as bright.  All of the light hits
> > surfaces, and THEN your eyeballs (well, unless you're looking straight
> up),
> > so while it doesn't look terribly bright, everything is VERY
> > well-illuminated.  While it is very easy on the eyes, it is somewhat
> > disappointing to add 400 watts of light, and not be able to say "Holy
cow,
> > that's bright!"

> > steve

 
 
 

New lighting, with a twist!

Post by Arc » Sun, 24 Aug 2003 22:08:34


Hi James,  Turners (not counting you) who have missed the e***ment of
a piece flying off the lathe  remind me of the married couple who claim
to have never had an argument. They don't care enough for each other to
bother, have poor memories or stretch the truth. ;)  Arch

                   Fortiter,

 
 
 

New lighting, with a twist!

Post by M.J. Or » Mon, 25 Aug 2003 07:32:38


James..........Buy yourself a Nova chuck and you too can enjoy the dangers
of flying wood........:-)

--
Email evades spam
Direct contact  through web site

M.J. Orr
http://www.FoundCollection.com/~morr
???
  ~


Quote:
> That's odd, I've also been turning for years, but have yet to break my
first
> florescent light, then again, I've never had a piece fly off my lathe at
> "high velocity" either.
> I sort of feel like I've missed out on all the e***ment some how.

> James Barley.
> www.members.shaw.ca/jbarley



> > Over the years I've had a peice fly-off at high velocity obliterating
> > florescents at least twice.  When one of those kinds of bulbs break it
> takes
> > forever to finally get all the tiny shards.
> > Good luck



> > >    A few months ago, they did some remodelling in our office building,
> so
> > > there were stacks of fluorescent light fixtures laying around.  A few
> > weeks
> > > ago, I mentioned to the building manager that I was tempted to take
some
> > of
> > > them home for my workshop.  He took me back to a closet, found 4 of
> them,
> > > said they were extras, and let me take them for free!  Well, of
course,
> I
> > > couldn't turn him down.  3 4' T8's in each one, high-power factor,
> > > commercial-rated high frequency electronic ballasts, and very nice
> > fixtures
> > > and reflectors.

> > >   Yesterday, I got out the 16' ladder to reach the ceiling, mounted
the
> > > lights, wired them in, and turned them on.  Nothing.  Well, OK, a
little
> > > flicker, but that's it.  My heart sank.  I pulled one down, took apart
> the
> > > fixture to look at the ballasts, and wouldn't you know it, they're
> > 220-volt
> > > ballasts.  Ah, shucks.

> > >   Well, everything DID turn out alright, because I have a subpanel in
> the
> > > shop that makes wiring easier, so I picked up a new 2-pole breaker and
> > > 2-pole switch.  Paying $8 for a simple switch was a little excessive,
I
> > > thought, but hey - after the $15 I spent on the breaker and switch, I
> > still
> > > came out way ahead of having to pay for new lights!

> > >   Here's the funny part:  After adding 400 watts of light to the shop,
I
> > > expected it to look VERy bright - but it really doesn't!  The
> high-quality
> > > reflectors do a terrific job of foxusing the light downward, and don't
> let
> > > it shine all over like a shop-light.  So, whereas a shoplight has
light
> > > hitting you directly in the eyeballs, making it LOOK bright, these
> don't,
> > > which makes them *appear* not to be as bright.  All of the light hits
> > > surfaces, and THEN your eyeballs (well, unless you're looking straight
> > up),
> > > so while it doesn't look terribly bright, everything is VERY
> > > well-illuminated.  While it is very easy on the eyes, it is somewhat
> > > disappointing to add 400 watts of light, and not be able to say "Holy
> cow,
> > > that's bright!"

> > > steve

 
 
 

New lighting, with a twist!

Post by Adri » Mon, 25 Aug 2003 18:26:29


They make a plastic tube to go over the fluorescent bulb for just such
problems: you can pick them up in any electrical supply store,
probably at Home Depot. Just slide it over the bulb....
Quote:

> Over the years I've had a peice fly-off at high velocity obliterating
> florescents at least twice.  When one of those kinds of bulbs break it takes
> forever to finally get all the tiny shards.
> > steve

 
 
 

New lighting, with a twist!

Post by Georg » Mon, 25 Aug 2003 19:17:50


Have to have the ineptitude to go with it, though.


Quote:
> James..........Buy yourself a Nova chuck and you too can enjoy the dangers
> of flying wood........:-)

 
 
 

New lighting, with a twist!

Post by Tony Manell » Tue, 26 Aug 2003 23:26:34


I own two supernova chucks and have been turning for 5 years, but managed to
only have one piece come off of the lathe.  With that one the wood broke
away while using it in expansion mode during bowl coring.  Am I doing
something wrong that I don't get pieces flying off of the lathe while using
my novas?  Please help me as I feel I am missing out on a significant part
of wood turning.  :-))
Tony Manella
http://www.FoundCollection.com/~ndd1/
Lehigh Valley Woodturners
http://www.FoundCollection.com/


Quote:
> James..........Buy yourself a Nova chuck and you too can enjoy the dangers
> of flying wood........:-)

> --
> Email evades spam
> Direct contact  through web site

> M.J. Orr
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/~morr
> ???
>   ~



> > That's odd, I've also been turning for years, but have yet to break my
> first
> > florescent light, then again, I've never had a piece fly off my lathe at
> > "high velocity" either.
> > I sort of feel like I've missed out on all the e***ment some how.

> > James Barley.
> > www.members.shaw.ca/jbarley



> > > Over the years I've had a peice fly-off at high velocity obliterating
> > > florescents at least twice.  When one of those kinds of bulbs break it
> > takes
> > > forever to finally get all the tiny shards.
> > > Good luck



> > > >    A few months ago, they did some remodelling in our office
building,
> > so
> > > > there were stacks of fluorescent light fixtures laying around.  A
few
> > > weeks
> > > > ago, I mentioned to the building manager that I was tempted to take
> some
> > > of
> > > > them home for my workshop.  He took me back to a closet, found 4 of
> > them,
> > > > said they were extras, and let me take them for free!  Well, of
> course,
> > I
> > > > couldn't turn him down.  3 4' T8's in each one, high-power factor,
> > > > commercial-rated high frequency electronic ballasts, and very nice
> > > fixtures
> > > > and reflectors.

> > > >   Yesterday, I got out the 16' ladder to reach the ceiling, mounted
> the
> > > > lights, wired them in, and turned them on.  Nothing.  Well, OK, a
> little
> > > > flicker, but that's it.  My heart sank.  I pulled one down, took
apart
> > the
> > > > fixture to look at the ballasts, and wouldn't you know it, they're
> > > 220-volt
> > > > ballasts.  Ah, shucks.

> > > >   Well, everything DID turn out alright, because I have a subpanel
in
> > the
> > > > shop that makes wiring easier, so I picked up a new 2-pole breaker
and
> > > > 2-pole switch.  Paying $8 for a simple switch was a little
excessive,
> I
> > > > thought, but hey - after the $15 I spent on the breaker and switch,
I
> > > still
> > > > came out way ahead of having to pay for new lights!

> > > >   Here's the funny part:  After adding 400 watts of light to the
shop,
> I
> > > > expected it to look VERy bright - but it really doesn't!  The
> > high-quality
> > > > reflectors do a terrific job of foxusing the light downward, and
don't
> > let
> > > > it shine all over like a shop-light.  So, whereas a shoplight has
> light
> > > > hitting you directly in the eyeballs, making it LOOK bright, these
> > don't,
> > > > which makes them *appear* not to be as bright.  All of the light
hits
> > > > surfaces, and THEN your eyeballs (well, unless you're looking
straight
> > > up),
> > > > so while it doesn't look terribly bright, everything is VERY
> > > > well-illuminated.  While it is very easy on the eyes, it is somewhat
> > > > disappointing to add 400 watts of light, and not be able to say
"Holy
> > cow,
> > > > that's bright!"

> > > > steve

 
 
 

New lighting, with a twist!

Post by James Barle » Wed, 27 Aug 2003 02:58:18


Tony,
using the term "Super Nova" in place of "Nova" is comparable to calling a
"Oneway" chuck a "OneWay Stronghold".
In both cases these chucks are totally different, but I think you already
know that.
 James

www.members.shaw.ca/jbarley


Quote:
> I own two supernova chucks and have been turning for 5 years, but managed
to
> only have one piece come off of the lathe.  With that one the wood broke
> away while using it in expansion mode during bowl coring.  Am I doing
> something wrong that I don't get pieces flying off of the lathe while
using
> my novas?  Please help me as I feel I am missing out on a significant part
> of wood turning.  :-))
> Tony Manella
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/~ndd1/
> Lehigh Valley Woodturners
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/



> > James..........Buy yourself a Nova chuck and you too can enjoy the
dangers
> > of flying wood........:-)

> > --
> > Email evades spam
> > Direct contact  through web site

> > M.J. Orr
> > http://www.FoundCollection.com/~morr
> > ???
> >   ~



> > > That's odd, I've also been turning for years, but have yet to break my
> > first
> > > florescent light, then again, I've never had a piece fly off my lathe
at
> > > "high velocity" either.
> > > I sort of feel like I've missed out on all the e***ment some how.

> > > James Barley.
> > > www.members.shaw.ca/jbarley



> > > > Over the years I've had a peice fly-off at high velocity
obliterating
> > > > florescents at least twice.  When one of those kinds of bulbs break
it
> > > takes
> > > > forever to finally get all the tiny shards.
> > > > Good luck



> > > > >    A few months ago, they did some remodelling in our office
> building,
> > > so
> > > > > there were stacks of fluorescent light fixtures laying around.  A
> few
> > > > weeks
> > > > > ago, I mentioned to the building manager that I was tempted to
take
> > some
> > > > of
> > > > > them home for my workshop.  He took me back to a closet, found 4
of
> > > them,
> > > > > said they were extras, and let me take them for free!  Well, of
> > course,
> > > I
> > > > > couldn't turn him down.  3 4' T8's in each one, high-power factor,
> > > > > commercial-rated high frequency electronic ballasts, and very nice
> > > > fixtures
> > > > > and reflectors.

> > > > >   Yesterday, I got out the 16' ladder to reach the ceiling,
mounted
> > the
> > > > > lights, wired them in, and turned them on.  Nothing.  Well, OK, a
> > little
> > > > > flicker, but that's it.  My heart sank.  I pulled one down, took
> apart
> > > the
> > > > > fixture to look at the ballasts, and wouldn't you know it, they're
> > > > 220-volt
> > > > > ballasts.  Ah, shucks.

> > > > >   Well, everything DID turn out alright, because I have a subpanel
> in
> > > the
> > > > > shop that makes wiring easier, so I picked up a new 2-pole breaker
> and
> > > > > 2-pole switch.  Paying $8 for a simple switch was a little
> excessive,
> > I
> > > > > thought, but hey - after the $15 I spent on the breaker and
switch,
> I
> > > > still
> > > > > came out way ahead of having to pay for new lights!

> > > > >   Here's the funny part:  After adding 400 watts of light to the
> shop,
> > I
> > > > > expected it to look VERy bright - but it really doesn't!  The
> > > high-quality
> > > > > reflectors do a terrific job of foxusing the light downward, and
> don't
> > > let
> > > > > it shine all over like a shop-light.  So, whereas a shoplight has
> > light
> > > > > hitting you directly in the eyeballs, making it LOOK bright, these
> > > don't,
> > > > > which makes them *appear* not to be as bright.  All of the light
> hits
> > > > > surfaces, and THEN your eyeballs (well, unless you're looking
> straight
> > > > up),
> > > > > so while it doesn't look terribly bright, everything is VERY
> > > > > well-illuminated.  While it is very easy on the eyes, it is
somewhat
> > > > > disappointing to add 400 watts of light, and not be able to say
> "Holy
> > > cow,
> > > > > that's bright!"

> > > > > steve

 
 
 

New lighting, with a twist!

Post by M.J. Or » Wed, 27 Aug 2003 12:16:45


Thanks for making my case for me Tony!.....:-)  Had you bought a
Oneway/Stronghold that would not have happened. (vbg)

--
Email evades spam
Direct contact  through web site

M.J. Orr
http://www.FoundCollection.com/~morr
???
  ~


Quote:
> I own two supernova chucks and have been turning for 5 years, but managed
to
> only have one piece come off of the lathe.  With that one the wood broke
> away while using it in expansion mode during bowl coring.  Am I doing
> something wrong that I don't get pieces flying off of the lathe while
using
> my novas?  Please help me as I feel I am missing out on a significant part
> of wood turning.  :-))
> Tony Manella
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/~ndd1/
> Lehigh Valley Woodturners
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/



> > James..........Buy yourself a Nova chuck and you too can enjoy the
dangers
> > of flying wood........:-)

> > --
> > Email evades spam
> > Direct contact  through web site

> > M.J. Orr
> > http://www.FoundCollection.com/~morr
> > ???
> >   ~



> > > That's odd, I've also been turning for years, but have yet to break my
> > first
> > > florescent light, then again, I've never had a piece fly off my lathe
at
> > > "high velocity" either.
> > > I sort of feel like I've missed out on all the e***ment some how.

> > > James Barley.
> > > www.members.shaw.ca/jbarley



> > > > Over the years I've had a peice fly-off at high velocity
obliterating
> > > > florescents at least twice.  When one of those kinds of bulbs break
it
> > > takes
> > > > forever to finally get all the tiny shards.
> > > > Good luck



> > > > >    A few months ago, they did some remodelling in our office
> building,
> > > so
> > > > > there were stacks of fluorescent light fixtures laying around.  A
> few
> > > > weeks
> > > > > ago, I mentioned to the building manager that I was tempted to
take
> > some
> > > > of
> > > > > them home for my workshop.  He took me back to a closet, found 4
of
> > > them,
> > > > > said they were extras, and let me take them for free!  Well, of
> > course,
> > > I
> > > > > couldn't turn him down.  3 4' T8's in each one, high-power factor,
> > > > > commercial-rated high frequency electronic ballasts, and very nice
> > > > fixtures
> > > > > and reflectors.

> > > > >   Yesterday, I got out the 16' ladder to reach the ceiling,
mounted
> > the
> > > > > lights, wired them in, and turned them on.  Nothing.  Well, OK, a
> > little
> > > > > flicker, but that's it.  My heart sank.  I pulled one down, took
> apart
> > > the
> > > > > fixture to look at the ballasts, and wouldn't you know it, they're
> > > > 220-volt
> > > > > ballasts.  Ah, shucks.

> > > > >   Well, everything DID turn out alright, because I have a subpanel
> in
> > > the
> > > > > shop that makes wiring easier, so I picked up a new 2-pole breaker
> and
> > > > > 2-pole switch.  Paying $8 for a simple switch was a little
> excessive,
> > I
> > > > > thought, but hey - after the $15 I spent on the breaker and
switch,
> I
> > > > still
> > > > > came out way ahead of having to pay for new lights!

> > > > >   Here's the funny part:  After adding 400 watts of light to the
> shop,
> > I
> > > > > expected it to look VERy bright - but it really doesn't!  The
> > > high-quality
> > > > > reflectors do a terrific job of foxusing the light downward, and
> don't
> > > let
> > > > > it shine all over like a shop-light.  So, whereas a shoplight has
> > light
> > > > > hitting you directly in the eyeballs, making it LOOK bright, these
> > > don't,
> > > > > which makes them *appear* not to be as bright.  All of the light
> hits
> > > > > surfaces, and THEN your eyeballs (well, unless you're looking
> straight
> > > > up),
> > > > > so while it doesn't look terribly bright, everything is VERY
> > > > > well-illuminated.  While it is very easy on the eyes, it is
somewhat
> > > > > disappointing to add 400 watts of light, and not be able to say
> "Holy
> > > cow,
> > > > > that's bright!"

> > > > > steve