Finish on light wood/sap wood

Finish on light wood/sap wood

Post by Ted » Fri, 11 Apr 2008 01:16:13



I have used mostly oil/wax finishes on my bowls:  walnut oil,
Mahoney's wax, Danish oil with Beall Buffing, mineral oil and beeswax,
etc.  When I apply these finishes too some light colored woods (light
maples, box elder, ect.) or to the sapwood on apple or cherry
sometimes I get a shade of yellow that I do not like.

What are some other kinds of finishes that are easy to apply, food
safe, easy for the customer to maintain and don't yellow white wood
and sap wood?

Thanks,
Ted

 
 
 

Finish on light wood/sap wood

Post by Fred Holde » Fri, 11 Apr 2008 05:45:02



Quote:
> I have used mostly oil/wax finishes on my bowls:  walnut oil,
> Mahoney's wax, Danish oil with Beall Buffing, mineral oil and beeswax,
> etc.  When I apply these finishes too some light colored woods (light
> maples, box elder, ect.) or to the sapwood on apple or cherry
> sometimes I get a shade of yellow that I do not like.

> What are some other kinds of finishes that are easy to apply, food
> safe, easy for the customer to maintain and don't yellow white wood
> and sap wood?

> Thanks,
> Ted

Hello Ted,

Most all if not all oil based finishes will somewhat yellow light
colored woods. I haven't used any of the water based finishes. But
I've found that Deft spray lacquer does about as well as anything to
prevent color change in the wood when finished. I've never used Deft
on items to be used in the kitchen or dining room, but only art type
objects. Deft clear gloss lacquer really makes the piece shine if
applied properly.  I generally use several light coats to prevent any
problem of the finish running  one the surface.

My primary finishes for turned for use pieces is walnut oil or Kerf's
Wood Creme. They are both food safe and fairly durable unless the item
is put into a dishwasher. The can also be easily maintained by the end
user.

Fred Holder
<http://www.morewoodturning.net>

 
 
 

Finish on light wood/sap wood

Post by Old Gu » Fri, 11 Apr 2008 10:57:07


Hi Ted,

I've had the same experience, and shifted to using shellac on most
woods to cut they yellow color.

I use Zinzer's Seal coat which is 2# cut dewaxed blonde.  I dilute it
about 2 shellac to 1 *** to get about a 1.5# cut.

I apply it with a folded shop paper towel.  Two coats immediately, one
right after the other.  Another can be added in a few hours unless
drying conditions are really bad.  I hand sand lightly to get the fuzz
down, using 400 grit or as low as 240 grit if the fuzz is bad.  One
more coat of shellac, and most things are done.  Add an extra one if
needed for shine.

I  hand buff with gray synthetic steel wool, and add a coat of
Renaissance wax, and buff.

Because shellac dries so fast, I do my finishing first thing when I
get to the shop, all dust has settled overnight.  By the time I'm
ready to start making more dust, the finish is dry enuf not to trap
dust.

I tried mixing my shellac from flakes, but didn't see the advantage
and the price was steep.

Old Guy


Quote:
> I have used mostly oil/wax finishes on my bowls: ?walnut oil,
> Mahoney's wax, Danish oil with Beall Buffing, mineral oil and beeswax,
> etc. ?When I apply these finishes too some light colored woods (light
> maples, box elder, ect.) or to the sapwood on apple or cherry
> sometimes I get a shade of yellow that I do not like.

> What are some other kinds of finishes that are easy to apply, food
> safe, easy for the customer to maintain and don't yellow white wood
> and sap wood?

> Thanks,
> Ted

 
 
 

Finish on light wood/sap wood

Post by l.vander.. » Fri, 11 Apr 2008 15:56:27


Hi Ted
I use pure tung oil, it does very little coloring, is food safe and
easy to apply/renew.
I get it from Lee Valley
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p=20049&cat=1,190,42942
Have fun and take care
Leo Van Der Loo


Quote:
> I have used mostly oil/wax finishes on my bowls: ?walnut oil,
> Mahoney's wax, Danish oil with Beall Buffing, mineral oil and beeswax,
> etc. ?When I apply these finishes too some light colored woods (light
> maples, box elder, ect.) or to the sapwood on apple or cherry
> sometimes I get a shade of yellow that I do not like.

> What are some other kinds of finishes that are easy to apply, food
> safe, easy for the customer to maintain and don't yellow white wood
> and sap wood?

> Thanks,
> Ted

 
 
 

Finish on light wood/sap wood

Post by Larry Blanchar » Sat, 12 Apr 2008 00:53:43


Quote:

> I tried mixing my shellac from flakes, but didn't see the advantage
> and the price was steep.

Only advantage of flakes is the range of colors available and the fact
that flakes last almost forever and premixed only lasts 2-3 years.

If you're happy with the color and you're using up the can before it goes
bad, then you're fine as is.

I use shellac in both turning and other woodworking because of its fast
drying and lack of toxicity.  It's the only finish approved for use ON
food - i.e. M&Ms, pills, etc..

BTW, some nice effects can be gotten by adding some dye to the 3rd or 4th
coat of shellac.

 
 
 

Finish on light wood/sap wood

Post by Andrew Bars » Sun, 13 Apr 2008 08:40:05


: Hi Ted,

: I've had the same experience, and shifted to using shellac on most
: woods to cut they yellow color.

Im used to think Deft from the can was colorless, but I did a workshop
cabinet in baltic birch plywood that changed my mind on that. Very
blonde shellac is close to clear, although it still has a slight tint.

Waterbase finishes are the way to go for true colorless film finishes.

: I tried mixing my shellac from flakes, but didn't see the advantage
: and the price was steep.

You get a wider range of types and colors, from ultrablonde (near
water clear) to a deep ruby red (garnet shellac).

        -- Andy Barss