Lime

Lime

Post by Robert Strudwic » Tue, 28 Mar 2000 04:00:00



I have just acquired a few Lime branches which I wish to turn into lamps
and candle stick. The wood is fresh-cut so very wet, I have no
experience with this type of wood so would be grateful for any guidance
that anyone can give. i.e. does it split/crack when drying, should I
rough turn and let it dry or what? Really, is it any good. I pick up any
free wood going and usually experiment.

Thanks in advance

Bob `S`
--
Robert Strudwick

 
 
 

Lime

Post by Duncan R. Bel » Wed, 29 Mar 2000 04:00:00


I was given some lime, 15 inch diameter. It went rotten and I had to throw
it away. I kept it in my lockup, which has badly-fitting doors so there's
plenty of ventilation, but after 15 months it had lost 40% of its weight,
and was useless.  I suppose you have to make sure you keep it dry - and I
don't know how that will affect its potential splitting capabilities.

Duncan R. Bell
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Quote:
> I have just acquired a few Lime branches which I wish to turn into lamps
> and candle stick. The wood is fresh-cut so very wet, I have no
> experience with this type of wood so would be grateful for any guidance
> that anyone can give. i.e. does it split/crack when drying, should I
> rough turn and let it dry or what? Really, is it any good. I pick up any
> free wood going and usually experiment.

> Thanks in advance

> Bob `S`
> --
> Robert Strudwick


 
 
 

Lime

Post by Alan Matthew » Wed, 29 Mar 2000 04:00:00


I have used lime from many sources, then found the results very variable.
Like Duncan said some went rotten even though it was stacked in a workshop,
some was so bad after three months that I would descibe it as the cell
structure collapsing. Other short flitches with the end painted took over a
year to lose about 40% weight, spalted and the bark fell off. It turned OK
though.
I think it is called Linden in the US and is often described as bland and
featureless in the texbooks. It is recommended especially for wood carving
(Grinling Gibbons was famous for his) but I have bought a plank froma a
local woodyard that had ripple and buur in it.
Splitting has been rare and minor, so give it a go.

Alan Matthews

 
 
 

Lime

Post by Robert Strudwic » Wed, 29 Mar 2000 04:00:00



thews.freeserve.co.uk> writes
Quote:
>I have used lime from many sources, then found the results very variable.
>Like Duncan said some went rotten even though it was stacked in a workshop,
>some was so bad after three months that I would descibe it as the cell
>structure collapsing. Other short flitches with the end painted took over a
>year to lose about 40% weight, spalted and the bark fell off. It turned OK
>though.
>I think it is called Linden in the US and is often described as bland and
>featureless in the texbooks. It is recommended especially for wood carving
>(Grinling Gibbons was famous for his) but I have bought a plank froma a
>local woodyard that had ripple and buur in it.
>Splitting has been rare and minor, so give it a go.

>Alan Matthews

Thanks to Duncan and Alan for the replies, I will give it a go and as
the saying goes, suck it and see, nothing lost if it goes `pear shaped`
Thanks

Bob `S`
--
Robert Strudwick