Positioning lathe in new shop???

Positioning lathe in new shop???

Post by Mack & Bette Jo McDonal » Tue, 02 Jan 2001 01:25:27



I'm getting ready to finally build a new shop this spring dedicated solely
to woodworking.  I'm a newbie to woodturning, but have really enjoyed it so
far, so I want to dedicate plenty of space to its layout.  Here goes: I
initially thought about positioning the lathe parallel to the wall--how many
feet from the wall should I stay to easily work around it?  Should I put it
in front of a window for light or will the shavings cover it up?  Other
lighting?  What if I were to position the lathe perpendicular to the wall to
give me plenty of space front and back, or would the shavings be all over
the shop?  Where would I position the sharpening center, and how do I store
my tools and accessories where they are easy to get to?  Any advise or
photos would be greatly appreciated.  thanks   Mack
 
 
 

Positioning lathe in new shop???

Post by Jon Schillin » Tue, 02 Jan 2001 03:46:34


Mack,
Suggest you consider some more items in your layout, such as the bandsaw,
drill press, a finish room,
possible exhaust fan for pushing dust out into atmosphere during warm
months,
a dust control system, and how you are going to deal with the shavings for
clean up and removal.
..................
If you trim your blanks on the bandsaw you might want the bandsaw near the
entrance,
and then carrying the blank to the lathe, your path should be straight and
clear of debris.
And where are you going to store the cutoffs from t***?
.........
Even in Southwestern Washington State, USA, sunlight can be a problem
instead of a blessing if the window(s) are on the east, west or south sides
of  your shop unless you include shades or blinds.
A large north facing window works well, though.    In the winter, on a sunny
day (rare as it may be) the lower in the southern sky SUN, blinds me and I
have to hang up a custom shade (black plastic garbage bag)
or else I can't see to turn from the tears steaming down my face.
............
Standing alone with 3 or 4 feet clearance all around the lathe allows for
access from any angle for turning and cleanup.    How will you carry the
shavings away?  If you might get into LARGE HOLLOW TURNINGS,
consider up to 10 feet clearance at the tailstock end of the lathe and on
around behind the lathe.   There are 8' boring bars out there.
.............
If you want to control shavings being flung all over your shop, you can
control them with
drop down blinds at this 3 or 4 feet clearance mark.   Another solution
which I plan to try is using a hospital ward type of curtains which travel
in a track in the ceiling.    Pull it around when you are turning and pull
it
back out of the way when you are not.
.............
Storing tools............
I find I use 3 or 4 tools regularly, and the other scores of tools
occasionally......
I also use regularly a chuck or two, the tommy bars and key chuck, a tape
measure and pencil
a shop built depth guage.
Consider a "tool palette" to hold these often used items.
If you have a long bed lathe you could mount the "palette" at the tail stock
end of the ways,
or you could have it mounted on a post with wheels for easy location.
I have a ***maid tool cabinet on wheels with a horizontal tool palette
resting on top.
I have the tool cabinet behind me over my right shoulder and I pivot around
to grab another tool.
I do find that with my long bed lathe I lay the prevous tool on the bed and
get another.    Once done, I
have to pick up the tools I have used and replace them to the palette.
I recall George Hatfield, Sydney, Australia discussed having a tool bench on
the opposite side of the lathe
where you reach through and grasp a new tool after laying down the old tool
on the bench.   George is
a Professor of Woodturning for a Government trade college and is focussed on
the spindle turning
type of turning and he works at extreme speed when turning and the bench
allows for quick exchange of tools.
I store my occasionally used tools in a tool cabinet a few steps away behind
me.
........
I don't have one, but a good friend of mine uses a magnetic bar to hold
little items such as dividers,
tommy bars, and the like.
................
I just watched John Jordan's presentation on the side ground gouge again and
I reacquainted myself with
John's encouragement:
"When you are really getting a nice cut and you are pleased with yourself,
STOP, and resharpen your gouge!
Make note when you begin cutting again that your gouge is cutting better
than it was when you were
pleased with its last cutting effort."
Therefore, you will save time, and be willing to sharpen more if the grinder
is close to you back over your left or right shoulder.
Place the grinder only a step or two away and raise the center of the wheels
to at least the height of your
spindle for ease of view.
John's first choice is a 60 grit wheel and use of the Oneway Sharpening
system, and
of course a free from embedded metal and sharp flat wheel, which requires
constant attention with a
little diamond truing tool.  (A tool comes with the complete Oneway
sharpening that will bring your wheel back
into round and clean it up too, and the diamond truing tool is needed
inbetween the cleanup efforts)
.........................
You need incadescent lighting.............Can be in addition to flourescent,
but you need strong incadescent
lighting to allow you to see the surface clearly for finishing.   As Soren
Berger said, "I can spot the turner
that only has flourescent lighting".   I challenged him and he replied that
those little indents in the center of the
inside bottom and those ripples along the bottom come from the turner not
being able to see them because of
using only flourescent lights.
David Ellsworth's video shows he uses 6 large wattage bulbs directly over
the lathe bed.
IN addition I use a halogen bulb on a floor stand and I can direct the light
inside the piece to
SEE THAT BOTTOM CLEARLY.
........
A dust collector, preferrably in another room, properly (scientifically
specified) built with correct sized ducting
and the like, with a hose to your lathe is a must, along with a good dust
helmet, or at a minimum a very good dust mask.  Oneida will design your duct
work and spec out what you need.
Overhead ducting is out of the way and easy to install, particularly if you
plan ahead.
........
If you have a vacuum system in mind, plan for it now.   The pump can also be
in another room with
the vacuum line overhead............You need to wire for turning on or off
the pump, or purchase a remote control device such as the 110 long ranger.
.........
Don't store your wood in your turning shop. As your collection of wood
grows, down goes the room
left in your shop.
A finishing room will delight you, and make the finish effort easier,
quicker and cleaner.
The finishing room can serve as a "final" drying room too, so have a small
heater and an exhaust fan.
.......
If your lathe was placed within 4 feet of a wall, you could consider a
strong exhaust fan to the outside
during warmer months...........If you had a teflon coated solid (no holes)
vertical screen*** 6 inches
away on the outside of the exhaust fan, the dust would fall to the
ground?????????////
............
When your shop gets so dust coated all over....................!!
Take an air hose, or a leaf blower, don your dust mask and blow all the dust
off the walls, lights,
and any other surfaces and leave the shop for a while.  Come back and do it
again.    Then you can sweep or vacuum the floors and you are ready for a
few more weeks.    Again, another David Ellsworth suggestion.
.......
Don't forget your lights, whether or not they have protective shields, and
especially if you are doing a lot
of green turning.   Get a bucket of warm water with some sudsy soap and
clean your lights.
Then you need your sun glasses for a while.   What a difference it will
make.
If ya got windows, clean them every now and then.   Note how the grass looks
greener, and the sky bluer!
.................
DONT STORE OILY RAGS IN YOUR SHOP, except in proper container built for oily
rag storage, and
I don't use rags at all.   I use paper towels and dispose of them outside
every time.
...............
Now is the time to plan.   Maybe you want to visit a couple of turners'
shops and ask them, too!

--
Jon Schilling, Ridgefield, Wa.


Quote:
> I'm getting ready to finally build a new shop this spring dedicated solely
> to woodworking.  I'm a newbie to woodturning, but have really enjoyed it
so
> far, so I want to dedicate plenty of space to its layout.  Here goes: I
> initially thought about positioning the lathe parallel to the wall--how
many
> feet from the wall should I stay to easily work around it?  Should I put
it
> in front of a window for light or will the shavings cover it up?  Other
> lighting?  What if I were to position the lathe perpendicular to the wall
to
> give me plenty of space front and back, or would the shavings be all over
> the shop?  Where would I position the sharpening center, and how do I
store
> my tools and accessories where they are easy to get to?  Any advise or
> photos would be greatly appreciated.  thanks   Mack


 
 
 

Positioning lathe in new shop???

Post by Steve Tiedma » Tue, 02 Jan 2001 05:50:42


Hi Mack,

I guess you have thought of some good ideas, and maybe the best way to do it
would be to stay flexible to the layout for a few weeks and rearrange it a few
times until it feels the best for you.  I would only suggest one thing for sure,
DON'T position the lathe so the window is in the "danger zone" of a piece of
stock breaking loose from the lathe and smashing out the window.  Ouch!!
Natural light is nice to have though, and also just being able to look out the
window instead of just looking at a blank wall.  Keep the window well behind
you, or to either end.

Keep the grinder within a few steps of the lathe.  The closer it is, the more
often you will use it to keep the tools as sharp as you should, resulting in
better cutting.  The height of the grinder should generally be about the same
height as the cutting height of the lathe, more or less.  This will help keep
you holding the tools in the same basic way at both machines.

With tool storage, 2 friends of mine do it 2 different ways.  One has his
turning tools simply spread out on a small table to the right side of the lathe
(click here and look at the top picture-
http://www.kestrelcreek.com/Lathe/Lathe_Bench.htm).  If doing it this way, you
may want to nail some cleats to the sides of the table to keep tools from
rolling off the sides.  No big deal.  The picture does not show it, but his
grinder/jig setup is on another small table at the left end of the lathe.
Everything he needs is within a step or 2 of the lathe, easily viewed and
accessed.  You'll notice that the lathe is somewhat central in the shop, and
there is a huge openable window about 6 feet behind him (see 2nd picture).

Another friend of mine has his lathe parallel to the wall, about 18" or so out
from the wall, with his tools standing vertical on a wall mounted rack on the
wall behind/parallel to the lathe.  His grinder is about 2 or 3 steps behind him
to the right side when standing at the lathe.  No windows in his shop.

My lathe was parallel to the wall, pretty much up against the wall.  I had my
grinder on a homemade stand immediately at the left end of the lathe, and my
tools were on a vertical stand which sat on my workbench about one step to the
right of the lathe.  I had a window on the wall behind the grinder, out of the
danger zone of the lathe.  I liked this because when weather permitted, I would
use a window fan blowing out the window to help remove airborne dust (had
another window on opposite wall open also to provide the flow of air).

If positioning the lathe parallel to the wall, and you want to work from both
sides for whatever reason, allow a couple of feet between the wall and lathe.
Otherwise, the lathe can sit pretty close up against the wall if you want.
Notice- you will probably develop a stripe of finish spray up the wall behind
the lathe, finish that gets spit off the piece if applying a heavy amount with
the lathe spinning too fast.  Live with it like a rite of passage, a badge of
honor!  Or stand a piece of spare plywood or drywall up against the wall behind
the lathe to catch any finish spit.  At least the wall is catching it instead of
it being spread on the floor or other surfaces if the lathe is perpendicular to
the wall.  This can all be controlled if you just apply your finishes carefully
and at a lower rpm.

For lighting, I have a clamp-on swinging arm desk lamp at the lathe, the lamp
with the coil springs on the arms and cost about $10-15 at office supply
stores.  I have a mini lathe mounted to a homemade stand, with the light mounted
to the bench at the headstock end.  I can position the light at any spot I need
it, including cranking it down and around to see right inside turned boxes,
bowls, vases, etc.  See the second picture of the above website for a similar
setup, but he has it mounted at the tailstock end in this picture.  He has since
relocated it to the headstock end because it gets in the way of the cutting
tools sometimes at the tailstock end.  For general lighting, I used 4'
florescent fixtures in the shop.  (Don't use 8' fixtures, have you ever tried to
transport 8' bulbs home from the store?)  If your shop is not kept at a steady
heat level, talk with a lighting specialist about florescent fixtures that are
rated to operate at lower temps without flickering.  These are generally
electronic ballast fixtures, a bit more expensive than the regular "shop light"
florescent lights.  Make sure they have shrouds or shields over the bulbs to
protect them from airborne chunks of wood.

And give yourself plenty of electrical outlets in the area of the lathe to avoid
extension cords.  Skip the 15 amp breaker/14 gauge wire size circuits in the
shop, go with 20 amp breaker/12 gauge wire size circuits throughout for your 120
volt circuits.  Give yourself some 240 volt circuits, too, a few 20 amp and a 30
amp, also.  But, consult an electrician about this before doing it.  20 amp/240
volt should handle anything up to 3hp, but you'll never know when you will want
that 5hp Laguna band saw!  A 30 amp/240 volt circuit should handle that big saw.

Since I mentioned this website, take a look around the site, tons of amazing
work, and a list of links ("Inspirational Links" at front page) that will
entertain and inform you for a week!

Hope this helps.

Steve Tiedman
St. Paul, MN, USA

--------------------------


Quote:
> I'm getting ready to finally build a new shop this spring dedicated solely
> to woodworking.  I'm a newbie to woodturning, but have really enjoyed it so
> far, so I want to dedicate plenty of space to its layout.  Here goes: I
> initially thought about positioning the lathe parallel to the wall--how many
> feet from the wall should I stay to easily work around it?  Should I put it
> in front of a window for light or will the shavings cover it up?  Other
> lighting?  What if I were to position the lathe perpendicular to the wall to
> give me plenty of space front and back, or would the shavings be all over
> the shop?  Where would I position the sharpening center, and how do I store
> my tools and accessories where they are easy to get to?  Any advise or
> photos would be greatly appreciated.  thanks   Mack

 
 
 

Positioning lathe in new shop???

Post by e » Tue, 02 Jan 2001 06:45:27


you might consider angling the lathe from the wall.



Quote:
> I'm getting ready to finally build a new shop this spring dedicated solely
> to woodworking.  I'm a newbie to woodturning, but have really enjoyed it
so
> far, so I want to dedicate plenty of space to its layout.  Here goes: I
> initially thought about positioning the lathe parallel to the wall--how
many
> feet from the wall should I stay to easily work around it?  Should I put
it
> in front of a window for light or will the shavings cover it up?  Other
> lighting?  What if I were to position the lathe perpendicular to the wall
to
> give me plenty of space front and back, or would the shavings be all over
> the shop?  Where would I position the sharpening center, and how do I
store
> my tools and accessories where they are easy to get to?  Any advise or
> photos would be greatly appreciated.  thanks   Mack

 
 
 

Positioning lathe in new shop???

Post by Lyn J. Mangiamel » Tue, 02 Jan 2001 14:38:09


Two quick thoughts. One is if you have a swivel head lathe like a Nova or
Poolewood, you can get by positioning your lathe closer to the wall. Just swivel
the head towards you to make the cuts that would otherwise have required access
from the back of the lathe.

Second, Steve talks of the finish stripe behind the lathe. I haven't heard this
discussed before, but it sure matches my experiece (Steve saying to himself,
again!). My solution was to place a slick white surfaced hardboard in this area
behind the lathe. My lumber yard sells this stuff in 4x8 sheets for use in
bathrooms and kitchens. Nothing sticks very well to this stuff, and it will take
most solvents for cleanup. Furthermore it's gloss white finish provides a good
backdrop against which to see a bowl turning on the lathe. The stuff is not very
expensive and has had up exceptionally well.

Lyn

Quote:

> Hi Mack,

> I guess you have thought of some good ideas, and maybe the best way to do it
> would be to stay flexible to the layout for a few weeks and rearrange it a few
> times until it feels the best for you.  I would only suggest one thing for sure,
> DON'T position the lathe so the window is in the "danger zone" of a piece of
> stock breaking loose from the lathe and smashing out the window.  Ouch!!
> Natural light is nice to have though, and also just being able to look out the
> window instead of just looking at a blank wall.  Keep the window well behind
> you, or to either end.

> Keep the grinder within a few steps of the lathe.  The closer it is, the more
> often you will use it to keep the tools as sharp as you should, resulting in
> better cutting.  The height of the grinder should generally be about the same
> height as the cutting height of the lathe, more or less.  This will help keep
> you holding the tools in the same basic way at both machines.

> With tool storage, 2 friends of mine do it 2 different ways.  One has his
> turning tools simply spread out on a small table to the right side of the lathe
> (click here and look at the top picture-
> http://www.kestrelcreek.com/Lathe/Lathe_Bench.htm).  If doing it this way, you
> may want to nail some cleats to the sides of the table to keep tools from
> rolling off the sides.  No big deal.  The picture does not show it, but his
> grinder/jig setup is on another small table at the left end of the lathe.
> Everything he needs is within a step or 2 of the lathe, easily viewed and
> accessed.  You'll notice that the lathe is somewhat central in the shop, and
> there is a huge openable window about 6 feet behind him (see 2nd picture).

> Another friend of mine has his lathe parallel to the wall, about 18" or so out
> from the wall, with his tools standing vertical on a wall mounted rack on the
> wall behind/parallel to the lathe.  His grinder is about 2 or 3 steps behind him
> to the right side when standing at the lathe.  No windows in his shop.

> My lathe was parallel to the wall, pretty much up against the wall.  I had my
> grinder on a homemade stand immediately at the left end of the lathe, and my
> tools were on a vertical stand which sat on my workbench about one step to the
> right of the lathe.  I had a window on the wall behind the grinder, out of the
> danger zone of the lathe.  I liked this because when weather permitted, I would
> use a window fan blowing out the window to help remove airborne dust (had
> another window on opposite wall open also to provide the flow of air).

> If positioning the lathe parallel to the wall, and you want to work from both
> sides for whatever reason, allow a couple of feet between the wall and lathe.
> Otherwise, the lathe can sit pretty close up against the wall if you want.
> Notice- you will probably develop a stripe of finish spray up the wall behind
> the lathe, finish that gets spit off the piece if applying a heavy amount with
> the lathe spinning too fast.  Live with it like a rite of passage, a badge of
> honor!  Or stand a piece of spare plywood or drywall up against the wall behind
> the lathe to catch any finish spit.  At least the wall is catching it instead of
> it being spread on the floor or other surfaces if the lathe is perpendicular to
> the wall.  This can all be controlled if you just apply your finishes carefully
> and at a lower rpm.

> For lighting, I have a clamp-on swinging arm desk lamp at the lathe, the lamp
> with the coil springs on the arms and cost about $10-15 at office supply
> stores.  I have a mini lathe mounted to a homemade stand, with the light mounted
> to the bench at the headstock end.  I can position the light at any spot I need
> it, including cranking it down and around to see right inside turned boxes,
> bowls, vases, etc.  See the second picture of the above website for a similar
> setup, but he has it mounted at the tailstock end in this picture.  He has since
> relocated it to the headstock end because it gets in the way of the cutting
> tools sometimes at the tailstock end.  For general lighting, I used 4'
> florescent fixtures in the shop.  (Don't use 8' fixtures, have you ever tried to
> transport 8' bulbs home from the store?)  If your shop is not kept at a steady
> heat level, talk with a lighting specialist about florescent fixtures that are
> rated to operate at lower temps without flickering.  These are generally
> electronic ballast fixtures, a bit more expensive than the regular "shop light"
> florescent lights.  Make sure they have shrouds or shields over the bulbs to
> protect them from airborne chunks of wood.

> And give yourself plenty of electrical outlets in the area of the lathe to avoid
> extension cords.  Skip the 15 amp breaker/14 gauge wire size circuits in the
> shop, go with 20 amp breaker/12 gauge wire size circuits throughout for your 120
> volt circuits.  Give yourself some 240 volt circuits, too, a few 20 amp and a 30
> amp, also.  But, consult an electrician about this before doing it.  20 amp/240
> volt should handle anything up to 3hp, but you'll never know when you will want
> that 5hp Laguna band saw!  A 30 amp/240 volt circuit should handle that big saw.

> Since I mentioned this website, take a look around the site, tons of amazing
> work, and a list of links ("Inspirational Links" at front page) that will
> entertain and inform you for a week!

> Hope this helps.

> Steve Tiedman
> St. Paul, MN, USA

> --------------------------


> > I'm getting ready to finally build a new shop this spring dedicated solely
> > to woodworking.  I'm a newbie to woodturning, but have really enjoyed it so
> > far, so I want to dedicate plenty of space to its layout.  Here goes: I
> > initially thought about positioning the lathe parallel to the wall--how many
> > feet from the wall should I stay to easily work around it?  Should I put it
> > in front of a window for light or will the shavings cover it up?  Other
> > lighting?  What if I were to position the lathe perpendicular to the wall to
> > give me plenty of space front and back, or would the shavings be all over
> > the shop?  Where would I position the sharpening center, and how do I store
> > my tools and accessories where they are easy to get to?  Any advise or
> > photos would be greatly appreciated.  thanks   Mack

 
 
 

Positioning lathe in new shop???

Post by Steven D. Russel » Wed, 03 Jan 2001 00:56:20


Hello Lyn,

Good tip on the white "slick-board" as we call it in Texas! I use old
foam core poster board from a law firm. This works ok, but the various
extractives will stick to it. I will try the slick-board in the future.
:-)

My stripe is up the back wall, continuing up the ceiling and a tiny bit
on the opposing wall behind me! :-0 It is not finishing products either,
as I rarely finish anything but spindles on the lathe. The goop is
released extractives, courtesy of wet timber! Perhaps I should panel the
whole ***y area with the slick-board! :-) <VBG>

I recently turned some *very* wet Sycamore... All of my turning shirts
now have a nice orange stripe on the left shoulder, not to mention the
nice bright orange stripe that covers the walls and ceiling. :-( Best
wishes for a safe, happy and prosperous New Year!

--
Letting the chips fly...
Steven D. Russell
Eurowood Werks Woodturning Studio
The Woodlands, Texas

Website coming soon!

Quote:

> Two quick thoughts. One is if you have a swivel head lathe like a Nova or
> Poolewood, you can get by positioning your lathe closer to the wall. Just swivel
> the head towards you to make the cuts that would otherwise have required access
> from the back of the lathe.

> Second, Steve talks of the finish stripe behind the lathe. I haven't heard this
> discussed before, but it sure matches my experiece (Steve saying to himself,
> again!). My solution was to place a slick white surfaced hardboard in this area
> behind the lathe. My lumber yard sells this stuff in 4x8 sheets for use in
> bathrooms and kitchens. Nothing sticks very well to this stuff, and it will take
> most solvents for cleanup. Furthermore it's gloss white finish provides a good
> backdrop against which to see a bowl turning on the lathe. The stuff is not very
> expensive and has had up exceptionally well.

> Lyn

 
 
 

Positioning lathe in new shop???

Post by Scott Po » Wed, 03 Jan 2001 01:06:16




Quote:
>Hello Lyn,

>Good tip on the white "slick-board" as we call it in Texas! I use old
>foam core poster board from a law firm. This works ok, but the various
>extractives will stick to it. I will try the slick-board in the future.
>:-)

I recently saw a tip in one of the woodworking rags that suggested
***  a windowshade on the wall behind the lathe.  Just pull it
down went finishing on the lathe, then roll it back up again for a
clear view of your nice, clean wall.  Seems like a good idea.

--

 
 
 

Positioning lathe in new shop???

Post by Steve Tiedma » Wed, 03 Jan 2001 01:37:36


Okay, let's get even cheaper and simpler: a roll of poly plastic (4 or 6
mill) and some thumb tacks.  Unroll as much plastic as needed and tack it to
the wall, ceiling, or wherever.  Dirt cheap and easy to change when its all
grubby.  Or as I originally suggested, wear the mess on the wall as a badge
of honor.

Steve Tiedman

St. Paul, MN, USA
-----------------------

Quote:



> >Hello Lyn,

> >Good tip on the white "slick-board" as we call it in Texas! I use old
> >foam core poster board from a law firm. This works ok, but the various
> >extractives will stick to it. I will try the slick-board in the future.
> >:-)

> I recently saw a tip in one of the woodworking rags that suggested
>***  a windowshade on the wall behind the lathe.  Just pull it
> down went finishing on the lathe, then roll it back up again for a
> clear view of your nice, clean wall.  Seems like a good idea.

> --


 
 
 

Positioning lathe in new shop???

Post by gary.. » Wed, 03 Jan 2001 03:27:55


I use a roll up cover out of an old hatchback Dodge Omni. It's blue but
could be painted white if you need more light and it cost me all of two
dollars at the salvage yard. It rolls up when your done finishing under
it's own power like a shade for the house. I use my back wall for
pegboard and hang my extra face plates, centers, calipers, and all the
miscellaneous junk that we seem to need at those odd moments. I don't
hang anything that I will need while the lathe is running back there
though unless it's way down by the tail stock. Don't feel the
temptation is worth the possible injury!


Quote:

> Okay, let's get even cheaper and simpler: a roll of poly plastic (4
or 6
> mill) and some thumb tacks.  Unroll as much plastic as needed and
tack it to
> the wall, ceiling, or wherever.  Dirt cheap and easy to change when
its all
> grubby.  Or as I originally suggested, wear the mess on the wall as a
badge
> of honor.

> Steve Tiedman

> St. Paul, MN, USA
> -----------------------




> > >Hello Lyn,

> > >Good tip on the white "slick-board" as we call it in Texas! I use
old
> > >foam core poster board from a law firm. This works ok, but the
various
> > >extractives will stick to it. I will try the slick-board in the
future.
> > >:-)

> > I recently saw a tip in one of the woodworking rags that suggested
> >***  a windowshade on the wall behind the lathe.  Just pull it
> > down went finishing on the lathe, then roll it back up again for a
> > clear view of your nice, clean wall.  Seems like a good idea.

> > --


Sent via Deja.com
http://www.FoundCollection.com/
 
 
 

Positioning lathe in new shop???

Post by mhorda » Wed, 03 Jan 2001 06:30:53




Socking great big snip

Quote:
>When your shop gets so dust coated all over....................!! Take
>an air hose, or a leaf blower, don your dust mask and blow all the
>dust off the walls, lights,
>and any other surfaces and leave the shop for a while.  Come back and
>do it again.    Then you can sweep or vacuum the floors and you are
>ready for a few more weeks.

Hello Jon,

Aren't those days when you do this just the best? Beats all the fun of
getting it dirty in the first place.
Well nearly.

--
Regards,
Brian.
http://www.molehillturnery.co.uk

Sent via Deja.com
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Positioning lathe in new shop???

Post by Bruce Matthew » Wed, 03 Jan 2001 15:25:11


In my shop I only get a chance to do any woodturning about 2 times a
year.  To keep down the clutter I made my stand with nylon buttons on
the legs so I can drag it out to the center of the shop to use and then
slide it back away when I'm doing other things.  As much fun as
woodturning is I suspect that it gets the short end of the stick time
wise among us "do it all" woodworkers.  So my advice would be to be
honest with how much each machine will be used and plan accordingly and
use some portability solutions to make things workable and accesable.
If the lathe will really see that much use then I would say back it to a
wall to keep down the shaving spray.  Natural light is not a big deal to
me as I like to use the directed light of a mechanical arm light to
shadow my work to better let me see the shape as it develops.  Better to
think about a dust collector or vacumn hose clamp arrangement for when
sanding.  As for the sharpening center it's nice to just turn around to
grind a tool but bear in mind that grinders make sparks and dry woods on
the lathe make a lot of fine dust.  I may be paranoid but I keep my dust
creators, solvents, paints and lawnmower gas on the opposite side of the
shop away from the grinders just in case.  It means a few more steps but
it keeps the grinding grit (dressing a stone makes an awful mess) away
from my other machines and the dust off the grinders.  Enjoy that new
shop!

Bruce Matthews


Quote:

> I'm getting ready to finally build a new shop this spring dedicated solely
> to woodworking.  I'm a newbie to woodturning, but have really enjoyed it so
> far, so I want to dedicate plenty of space to its layout.  Here goes: I
> initially thought about positioning the lathe parallel to the wall--how many
> feet from the wall should I stay to easily work around it?  Should I put it
> in front of a window for light or will the shavings cover it up?  Other
> lighting?  What if I were to position the lathe perpendicular to the wall to
> give me plenty of space front and back, or would the shavings be all over
> the shop?  Where would I position the sharpening center, and how do I store
> my tools and accessories where they are easy to get to?  Any advise or
> photos would be greatly appreciated.  thanks   Mack

 
 
 

Positioning lathe in new shop???

Post by Bob Mood » Thu, 04 Jan 2001 09:01:57


There are so many good ideas in these responses, I hate to comment further.
BUT I will anyhow.  Layout depends mostly on your own method of work.  I
learned a handy trick when my wife and I moved into our second house.  I had
got damn tired of rearranging furniture in the first one.  The second time,
I drew scale floor plans for each room and made cutout pieces, to scale, of
each piece of heavy furniture.  I told her she could move those little
scraps around all she wanted, but the heavy stuff got positioned only once.
To keep it fair, I did the same thing in the shop.  It was an empty
ba***t, so I had to worry about wiring and lighting layouts as well as
equipment.  I positioned the cutouts and then imagined all the jobs I had
ever done, until found a configuration that seemed to be in balance.  That
was six years ago and I haven't had to change a thing since.  That 1/4" grid
paper they sell in the ***tores works fine for the floorplans and the
cutout pieces.
 
 
 

Positioning lathe in new shop???

Post by Joe Flemin » Thu, 04 Jan 2001 07:56:16


Mack,

Jon suggested lots of good ideas.  I will build on that.

My shop is a 1-car garage.  I actually have a 3-car garage, but my wife requires
both cars inside.  I originally had my lathe against a side wall, with the
headstock angled away for behind access.  This worked ok, but I found that
longer tools sometimes wanted to bump on the wall - especially when doing
hollowing.

My next arrangement had the lathe parallel to the roll-up garage door.  I
thought that having the door open with a fan behind would provide great light
with good ventilation.  The extra bonus for me is that I have two kids that like
to ride their bikes around the neighborhood and this orientation allows me to
keep an eye on them when they are out there.  The ventilation part worked great,
but the light was bad.  The sunlight was too bright for backlighting.  The
position was also not good for kid-watching because when turning, I found that
my attention was toward the headstock and not out the door.  When hollowing, my
back was completely turned on them.

I am currently using the lathe perpendicular to the big door, with the headstock
near the door and the tailstock pointing into the garage.  I have about 2 feet
on the backside for standing when hollowing.  Since your attention is in the
general direction of the headstock, working from either side still gives me
line-of-sight out the door to watch the kids when necessary.  Make sure that you
leave enough room on the headstock end to insert the knockout bar.  I set my
Stubby up wit the garage door open and didn't figure this out until late one
night when the door was closed.  Moving a 700+ lb lathe 10 inches was not fun.

I have my bandsaw behind me against the opposite wall of the garage stall.  My
grinder sits next to that.  I do most of my chainsawing in the driveway right
outside the garage, so quick access to the bandsaw for further breakdown works
well.

I still have my fan positioned to blow out the garage door.  I have an access
door in the other end of the garage that I open to provide good circulation.  It
works very well, although I do get chips blowing into my right ear
occasionally.  The fan sits on my tablesaw about 3 feet past my tailstock.  The
tablesaw is also where I put the tailstock when removed from the lathe bed.

I bought a toolbox from Home Depot for storing chucks, tools, centers, finishing
materials and misc. tools.  It is one of those roll-around things designed to go
under a traditional toolbox.  the top is reserved for all the items that I'm too
lazy to put away when I should.

I have a couple of suspended shop lights above the lathe area for overall
lighting.  I have one of those articulated desk lights mounted in a home made
stand.  The stand is an old paint can with a 4' piece of 1/2" EMT conduit
sticking out.  The can is full of post-hole concrete.  The articulated lamp fits
inside the conduit just right.

Make sure that you have adequate outlets near your lathe for the following:

- your lathe
- a drill if you do power sanding
- your fan for ventilation
- your dust extraction (if any)
- your bandsaw
- your radio

Although not ideal, I have a suspended tool rack that is about 4 feet wide with
magnetic holders where most of my tools are stored.  It is flush to the side
wall.  It is a 3' x 4' sheet of plywood tilted slightly back with a foot on
which the heels of the tools can rest.  I stretch a bungee cord across the width
of the rack for additional security against falling tools (I live in earthquake
country, but have yet to have one attempt to disrupt my shop).  Depending on
what kind of turning I'm doing, I simply retrieve the needed tools and lay them
on the lathe bed for quick retrieval during the turning session.

I also have a 2'd x 4'w x 7'h metal rack where I store wood blanks.  I also have
a 5' firewood rack that is quite full too.  I have decided, however, that the 5'
rack needs to go and the surplus wood sent to the firewood pile.  For those of
you that just gasped in disbelief, please note that most of the surplus has
unilaterally turned itself into firewood without my provocation.  I just have
too much and need to clean house.

All of the above fits in half of the 1-car garage stall (about 11' x 11').  The
rest of the 1-car stall (about 11' x 11') is the rest of my shop:  workbench,
tool storage, drill press, etc.

Because of the roll-up garage door, the suspended items are cantilevered with
angle iron from the adjacent walls.

I use clear shower curtains strung on 1/8" cable to divide my wife's side from
my side and to keep chips from flying all over the rest of the 1-car stall.

Joe Fleming - San Diego, CA
===========================================

 
 
 

Positioning lathe in new shop???

Post by Kenneth Jackma » Fri, 05 Jan 2001 02:11:28


While you're locating your tools you have the opportunity to do some safety
planning, too.  Having the grinder too close to the lathe is a (minor) fire
hazard, that can be dealt with by having the grinder off one end or the
other of the lathe.  (Most of your chips will fall on the sides of the
lathe.  In any event, its a good idea to keep the fire extinguisher (you
*do* have a fire extinguisher, don't you?)  close to the grinder.

Don't put a tool rack across the lathe from where you stand!  Reaching
across a turning piece is tempting, but dangerous.

I built shelves and workbenches around 3 sides of my shop and ran the
ductwork for the dust collector under the bottom shelf.  It avoids having to
lift every chip eight to ten feet.  I think I get a lot more suction from
it, but it can be a pain, because I have flexible ductwork temporarily
connected to the tool I happen to be working with.  Its worth some
thought....

In the long run, it probably doesn't matter where you place any of your
tools.  You will wish you had them in another location within three months.
You might consider putting them on wheels.
Good luck!
ken in dunnellon,fl