Electronic Ornamental Turning

Electronic Ornamental Turning

Post by Bruce Reitma » Sat, 11 Jan 1997 04:00:00



Does anyone have experience or feedback about Sorby's RS3000?
It's an electronic cutter that synchronizes to your lathes spindle speed
and then uses reciprocating plunge cuts to create ornamental patterns.
Sounds like a fun gadget -- but is it worth the $ 750???

Bruce Reitman

 
 
 

Electronic Ornamental Turning

Post by mto.. » Sat, 11 Jan 1997 04:00:00


Quote:
>Bruce Reitman writes
>Does anyone have experience or feedback about Sorby's RS3000?
>It's an electronic cutter that synchronizes to your lathes spindle speed
>and then uses reciprocating plunge cuts to create ornamental patterns.
>Sounds like a fun gadget -- but is it worth the $ 750???

Have a look at the things on my homepage http://members.aol.com/MTOram,
have a think how you could  cut those patterns any other way, and then
perhaps contact me,  (I will do my best to answer any questions as
impartially as possible- without bull) or Dr Robert James McNeil in
Cambria-  he is so impressed with it that he paid my fare to visit him- no
joke.
He also says that he will be happy to show interested people how it works-
just arrange an appointment. Contact me for the rest of his address.

Martin

 
 
 

Electronic Ornamental Turning

Post by clan.. » Sat, 11 Jan 1997 04:00:00



Quote:

>Subject:    Electronic Ornamental Turning

>Date:       10 Jan 1997 02:52:05 GMT

>Does anyone have experience or feedback about Sorby's RS3000?
>It's an electronic cutter that synchronizes to your lathes spindle speed
>and then uses reciprocating plunge cuts to create ornamental patterns.
>Sounds like a fun gadget -- but is it worth the $ 750???

>Bruce Reitman

Bruce,

The RS3000, I have to admit is a brilliant piece of kit, but its more of a
`fun gadget`, as you stated, its a serious bit of kit. I have had the
pleasure of watching the RS3000 being used and I must say its an
impressive piece of technology. As for the price tag, considering what the
RS3000 does and at the speed that it does it, its relatively inexpensive.
Consider the alternatives !

C.

 
 
 

Electronic Ornamental Turning

Post by James P. Ris » Sun, 12 Jan 1997 04:00:00



Quote:

> Bruce,

> The RS3000, I have to admit is a brilliant piece of kit, but its more of a
> `fun gadget`, as you stated, its a serious bit of kit. I have had the
> pleasure of watching the RS3000 being used and I must say its an
> impressive piece of technology. As for the price tag, considering what the
> RS3000 does and at the speed that it does it, its relatively inexpensive.
> Consider the alternatives !

> C.

Clan;
I really do not want to consider the alternatives.  They might be such
things such as slow hand carving, slipping and cutting my hand, hand
sanding, doing without, having money in the bank, etc.  It's just too much
for me to consider.

I'm too busy thinking up things I might use the RS3000 to create and where
to find the bucks to buy it!

I'm waiting to read the full manuals before my final decision.  My major
concerns are how durable is it and will it give a good finish on something
other than ideal boxwood (rare in Arizona)?
JIm

--
James P. Riser
Home page:  http://www.azstarnet.com/~jriser

 
 
 

Electronic Ornamental Turning

Post by mto.. » Mon, 13 Jan 1997 04:00:00


Jim.
Sorry to ***in again, but you did send an open letter.  

Durability of the RS3000.
What can I say? I got  the first production rs3000 to destruction test.  I
am still using it now, with no failure and no repairs.  
I have seriously tried to break it, knowing as I do that there are people
out there who do not have a touch like a midwife.  
I have used it to produce batches of samples for Sorby, (proof of the
attractive nature of the results, several batches, due to them being
stolen) demo-ing at shows in 12hr stretches, in the workshop etc.  The
word that comes to mind is ROBUST.  It has been stripped for examination
three times,  and is still with little sign of wear after two years very
hard use.
The Control box has a failsafe switching transistor for the power output.
If it gets too hot, it shuts the box down, coming on again when it cools.
Sorby's havn't yet had a control box returned faulty.  In fact they havnt
yet had a return as far as I know!
The only thing to make sure of is lubrication of the cutterholder bearing,
and that has a two effects: the obvious one, wear reduction, and also if
the bearing is dry the cut quality goes down because the cutter train is
less free to slide.  The trick is to stop just before the final finish and
give it a drop of Engine oil.  It then rewards you with a polished
surface.  Having said that, there have been RS3000's used for weeks
without oil (because the Sorby rep. in question, since fired, didn't
bother to read the instructions!), and when oiled again still produced the
results.

Timbers to use.
There are no hard and fast rules.  If you can't mark it with your
thumb-nail, it will probably work very well.  I dont know what timbers are
available in Arizona, but when I was demo-ing in San Mateo in November I
got some 'Mountain Mahogany' which I believe is Juniper.  Light Tan in
colour, few markings, close grained, and as hard as the Devil's forehead.
It was wonderfull.  Cut to a super polish.
I have found that the best thing is to try it.  The plastics work, Mock
Ivory etc, if taken carefully- they are not as forgiving as timber,  and I
have used the machine on Brass, Aluminium, and even Whitby Jet- the
fossilized resin of the MonkeyPuzzle tree, used in Jewelry making.

I know you would be happier if there was someone else answering, but the
tech. of using the gadget is very new.  It is not in my interests to make
false claims- I dont need the damage to my reputation- but I did invent
the thing.

Regards,
Martin.

Jim.
Sorry to ***in, but you did send an open letter.  

Durability of the RS3000.
What can I say? I got  the first production rs3000 to destruction test.  I
am still using it now, with no failure and no repairs.  
I have seriously tried to break it, knowing as I do that there are people
out there who do not have a touch like a midwife.  
I have used it to produce batches of samples for Sorby, (proof of the
attractive nature of the results, several batches, due to them being
stolen) demo-ing at shows in 12hr stretches, in the workshop etc.  The
word that comes to mind is ROBUST.  It has been stripped for examination
three times,  and is still with little sign of wear after two years very
hard use.
The Control box has a failsafe switching transistor for the power output.
If it gets too hot, it shuts the box down, coming on again when it cools.
Sorby's havn't yet had a control box returned faulty.  In fact they havnt
yet had a return as far as I know!
The only thing to make sure of is lubrication of the cutterholder bearing,
and that has a two effects: the obvious one, wear reduction, and also if
the bearing is dry the cut quality goes down because the cutter train is
less free to slide.  The trick is to stop just before the final finish and
give it a drop of Engine oil.  It then rewards you with a polished
surface.  Having said that, there have been RS3000's used for weeks
without oil (because the Sorby rep. in question, since fired, didn't
bother to read the instructions!), and when oiled again still produced the
results.

Timbers to use.
There are no hard and fast rules.  If you can't mark it with your
thumb-nail, it will probably work very well.  I dont know what timbers are
available in Arizona, but when I was demo-ing in San Mateo in November I
got some 'Mountain Mahogany' which I believe is Juniper.  Light Tan in
colour, few markings, close grained, and as hard as the Devil's forehead.
It was wonderfull.  Cut to a super polish.
I have found that the best thing is to try it.  The plastics work, Mock
Ivory etc, if taken carefully- they are not as forgiving as timber,  and I
have used the machine on Brass, Aluminium, and even Whitby Jet- the
fossilized resin of the MonkeyPuzzle tree, used in Jewelry making.

I know you would be happier if there was someone else answering, but the
tech. of using it is very new.  It is not in my interests to make false
claims- I dont need the damage to my reputation- but I did invent the
thing.

Regards,
Martin.

 
 
 

Electronic Ornamental Turning

Post by mto.. » Wed, 22 Jan 1997 04:00:00


For the benefit of those who have been looking at my homepage for
information about the RS3000, posted with this message is a recent example
of work done with the machine.  Just to say that the possibilities are
endless, and that I am still discovering what it can do.

(I hope this process works)

Martin
Homepage  http://members.aol.com/mtoram

 
 
 

Electronic Ornamental Turning

Post by mto.. » Wed, 22 Jan 1997 04:00:00


Dear all
The picture send didnt work.  The picture is on my website now in the
Ornamental Turning Gallery.

Martin.