SHARPENING TURNING TOOLS

SHARPENING TURNING TOOLS

Post by Jim Seyber » Fri, 28 Jul 2000 04:00:00



I was searching for low-speed grinders and came across this site:
www.jacquescoulombe.com.  The company is Jacques Coulombe Ltee in
Montreal.  They currently have General International 6" and 8"
1800-rpm grinders on sale for $84.00 and $127.50 (Can.), respectively.
Their stock nos. are #15-600 for the 6" and 15-800 for the 8".

Jim

 
 
 

SHARPENING TURNING TOOLS

Post by ja baggale » Mon, 31 Jul 2000 04:00:00


try using your belt sander. forget all this nonsense about grinding wheels
and angles,thats for the geeks,the geeks want to sell boooks and to make a
mystery out of something very simple. did we have books on woodturning in
1850?

Quote:
> I was searching for low-speed grinders and came across this site:
> www.jacquescoulombe.com.  The company is Jacques Coulombe Ltee in
> Montreal.  They currently have General International 6" and 8"
> 1800-rpm grinders on sale for $84.00 and $127.50 (Can.), respectively.
> Their stock nos. are #15-600 for the 6" and 15-800 for the 8".

> Jim


 
 
 

SHARPENING TURNING TOOLS

Post by Ed Frenc » Mon, 31 Jul 2000 04:00:00


ja:
Actually our ancestors did have books on woodturning in 1850 and
considerably earlier than that.  John Jacob Holtzapffel wrote several
volumes in the 1880's which reference earlier works.  One reference was
"Panoplia Omnium" a work by Hartman Schopper, published at Frankfor-on-the
Main, 1568.  This was the earliest representation of the pole lathe that
Holzapffel was familiar with.

I don't think they would be using glass paper for sharpening wood turning
tools then, but I would guess that hand powered stone wheels were probably
being used.

In spite of that I happen to agree with you about using sand paper to
sharpen your woodturning tools.  It has several advantages over a grinder.

1.  The sharpening surface doesn't wear like a grindstone, so your settings
are more repeatable.
2.  When the sandpaper wears out it is much less expensive to replace.(and
it takes a very long time to wear out)
3.  A sandpaper system's initial cost is lower.

I don't use a belt sander for my sandpaper system, but I have seen others
that work very well.

Jim:
If you do get the grinder, get the larger diameter wheel.  The wider wheels
are much easier to put a side grind on a bowl gouge with.


| try using your belt sander. forget all this nonsense about grinding wheels
| and angles,thats for the geeks,the geeks want to sell boooks and to make a
| mystery out of something very simple. did we have books on woodturning in
| 1850?


| > I was searching for low-speed grinders and came across this site:
| > www.jacquescoulombe.com.  The company is Jacques Coulombe Ltee in
| > Montreal.  They currently have General International 6" and 8"
| > 1800-rpm grinders on sale for $84.00 and $127.50 (Can.), respectively.
| > Their stock nos. are #15-600 for the 6" and 15-800 for the 8".
| >
| > Jim
|
|

 
 
 

SHARPENING TURNING TOOLS

Post by Donald R. Watlan » Tue, 15 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Actually, in the 1800's there were many books written about woodturning,
both normal and ornamental in flavor, including very in-depth studies on
tools and sharpening them.  Actually, grinding wheels were also part of the
repertoire of the 1800's.  The thing missing from your list for us geeks was
the belt sander!

--
Donald Watland
Watland Design


Quote:
> try using your belt sander. forget all this nonsense about grinding wheels
> and angles,thats for the geeks,the geeks want to sell boooks and to make a
> mystery out of something very simple. did we have books on woodturning in
> 1850?


> > I was searching for low-speed grinders and came across this site:
> > www.jacquescoulombe.com.  The company is Jacques Coulombe Ltee in
> > Montreal.  They currently have General International 6" and 8"
> > 1800-rpm grinders on sale for $84.00 and $127.50 (Can.), respectively.
> > Their stock nos. are #15-600 for the 6" and 15-800 for the 8".

> > Jim