pens from light woods question

pens from light woods question

Post by Rob McConachi » Thu, 22 Jan 2004 11:16:25



Greetings!

I am have tried several times to turn pens from things like Oak and Maple
and it seems that the metal from the bushings (penn state ind) comes off
very easily and then muddies the wood that I am working on.  With coco or
ebony, this is obviously not a problem.  But, with light (or white) wood, it
is obvious.

So, my question is how do I not get the metal from the bushings to dirty the
wood?

Anybody?

thanks.

 
 
 

pens from light woods question

Post by AHilto » Thu, 22 Jan 2004 11:31:09


Don't touch the bushings with the sandpaper on the last few grits (what I
do) or use wooden bushings.

- Andrew


Quote:
> Greetings!

> I am have tried several times to turn pens from things like Oak and Maple
> and it seems that the metal from the bushings (penn state ind) comes off
> very easily and then muddies the wood that I am working on.  With coco or
> ebony, this is obviously not a problem.  But, with light (or white) wood,
it
> is obvious.

> So, my question is how do I not get the metal from the bushings to dirty
the
> wood?

> Anybody?

> thanks.


 
 
 

pens from light woods question

Post by Doug Mill » Thu, 22 Jan 2004 12:18:57



Quote:
>Greetings!

>I am have tried several times to turn pens from things like Oak and Maple
>and it seems that the metal from the bushings (penn state ind) comes off
>very easily and then muddies the wood that I am working on.  With coco or
>ebony, this is obviously not a problem.  But, with light (or white) wood, it
>is obvious.

>So, my question is how do I not get the metal from the bushings to dirty the
>wood?

Depending on what kind of sandpaper you're using, it may be particles of the
abrasive, rather than material removed from the bushings. I've had problems
with off-brand wet-or-dry papers, especially in the finer grits; it seems that
the adhesive that bonds the grit to the backing has a very low melting point,
rendering the paper essentially useless for anything except wet sanding. I
have *never* experienced the type of problem you describe when using
good-quality US- or Canadian-made sandpaper.

--
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)

How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?

 
 
 

pens from light woods question

Post by Digge » Thu, 22 Jan 2004 12:41:12


Use light colored sanding cloth and before you sand, put a thin coat of CA
glue on the bushing surfaces.  It works very well.  Just be careful and not
glue the blank to the bushing.

Digger


Quote:
> Greetings!

> I am have tried several times to turn pens from things like Oak and Maple
> and it seems that the metal from the bushings (penn state ind) comes off
> very easily and then muddies the wood that I am working on.  With coco or
> ebony, this is obviously not a problem.  But, with light (or white) wood,
it
> is obvious.

> So, my question is how do I not get the metal from the bushings to dirty
the
> wood?

> Anybody?

> thanks.

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pens from light woods question

Post by Leo Lichtma » Thu, 22 Jan 2004 13:46:34


Also, try applying coats of sanding sealer to the wood before sanding, and
between grades of sandpaper.  This will fill the pores of the wood, so as
you approach the final finish there will be no open pores in the wood to
absorb the metal debris.

BTW, I have also used this technique to decrease tearout.  The sanding
sealer not only fills the pores, it stiffens the loose ends of the wood
fibres, so sanding cuts them off cleaner.

 
 
 

pens from light woods question

Post by Darrell Feltmat » Thu, 22 Jan 2004 21:45:57


Rob
Clean the pens off as they turn. I use a 50/50 mix of vegetable and
mineral oil as a "prefinish" and wipe it down as the pen spins. It
removes the dark stuff whether sand paper residue or metal from
bushings. Then I apply the final finish.
--
God bless and safe turning
Darrell Feltmate
Truro, NS, Canada
http://www.roundthewoods.com
 
 
 

pens from light woods question

Post by Chuc » Fri, 23 Jan 2004 04:39:21


On Wed, 21 Jan 2004 02:16:25 GMT, "Rob McConachie"

Quote:

>So, my question is how do I not get the metal from the bushings to dirty the
>wood?

If you go to your local, well-stocked hardware store, you should be
able to find pre-drilled, cylindrical nylon bushings that are the
exact inside diameter to fit over your pen mandrel (Hint: Take the
mandrel with you.) They are generally found in those little cardboard
or plastic drawers we all love to poke through.

These can be easily turned to the same diameter as your metal bushings
and serve the purpose nicely.  I use these as spacers on the end of
the mandrel, for when the blanks and bushings don't take up the whole
mandrel.  

--
Chuck *#:^)
chaz3913(AT)yahoo(DOT)com
Anti-spam sig: please remove "NO SPAM" from e-mail address to reply.
<><

September 11, 2001 - Never Forget

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pens from light woods question

Post by Rob McConachi » Fri, 23 Jan 2004 07:30:44


Excellent Idea!!!

I will have to try that!! I was considering turning some bushings from wood
but i coudlnt figure out how to do it.

but, nylon makes more sense to me!  Plus, I bet that the CA finish does not
like to stick to nylon as much as with metal to metal.

Thanks for the suggestions guys!

I will have to try them!

Rob

Quote:
> On Wed, 21 Jan 2004 02:16:25 GMT, "Rob McConachie"

> >So, my question is how do I not get the metal from the bushings to dirty
the
> >wood?

> If you go to your local, well-stocked hardware store, you should be
> able to find pre-drilled, cylindrical nylon bushings that are the
> exact inside diameter to fit over your pen mandrel (Hint: Take the
> mandrel with you.) They are generally found in those little cardboard
> or plastic drawers we all love to poke through.

> These can be easily turned to the same diameter as your metal bushings
> and serve the purpose nicely.  I use these as spacers on the end of
> the mandrel, for when the blanks and bushings don't take up the whole
> mandrel.

> --
> Chuck *#:^)
> chaz3913(AT)yahoo(DOT)com
> Anti-spam sig: please remove "NO SPAM" from e-mail address to reply.
> <><

> September 11, 2001 - Never Forget

> -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =-----
> http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World!
> -----==  Over 100,000 Newsgroups - 19 Different Servers! =-----

 
 
 

pens from light woods question

Post by Larry Gottli » Fri, 23 Jan 2004 10:03:07


After I turn the ends to size and carefully sand with the first grit
(240) I remove the bushings and replace with segments of the brass
tubes. At this time I coat ends of blanks and center with wax
I then continue to sand, use CA both as a filler and later as a
finish.
Take care to not sand the ends too much. A little rounding over will
make the junction with the metal tip smooth.

Larry
Hand Turned Pens at http://pws.chartermi.net/~lgottlieb2/