Food safe coatings.

Food safe coatings.

Post by Jason E. Bro » Wed, 10 May 2000 04:00:00



I am wondering what kinds of sealers/coatings would be safe for wood
turned goblets and mugs for hot and cold drinks.

Any suggestions?

Jason E. Brown

www.masterforge.com

 
 
 

Food safe coatings.

Post by Rick » Thu, 11 May 2000 04:00:00


I don't want to sound arrogant or stupid, but when did anyone
actually enjoy drinking wine or a hot drink from a wooden goblet?
I'm a bit like the old sailor, I guess, who said that if God
wanted us to make fibreglass boats he would have made fibreglass
trees!

Sorry if I'm not very helpful this time!

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Food safe coatings.

Post by Rex Hasli » Thu, 11 May 2000 04:00:00


One could apply the same logic to your argument.  Seen a lot of natural
glass lately or silver for that matter.

These two materials are also drastically processed to make drinking vessels.

Wooden vessels go back ages, and have certain qualities that other material
will never posess

Red wine or port from a wooden vessel is devine.  Being best served at room
temperature, the wine and the goblet are the same temp.  Glass always seems
cold, as do silver goblets  Wood is also a tactile medium, so holding a
wooden goblet is a pleasant experience as well as being able to partake in
the liquid it hold.

I don't know about the hot drink thing, as I have never tried it.

As for a finish,  I use a Matt alcahol resistant polyurethane over sanding
sealer (one coat of each)

Its non toxic, hardy and still retains much of the woo qualities.

A view from the south pacific

Rex Haslip
Auckland
New Zealand


Quote:
> I don't want to sound arrogant or stupid, but when did anyone
> actually enjoy drinking wine or a hot drink from a wooden goblet?
> I'm a bit like the old sailor, I guess, who said that if God
> wanted us to make fibreglass boats he would have made fibreglass
> trees!

> Sorry if I'm not very helpful this time!

> * Sent from RemarQ http://www.remarq.com The Internet's Discussion Network
*
> The fastest and easiest way to search and participate in Usenet - Free!

 
 
 

Food safe coatings.

Post by Grusser » Thu, 11 May 2000 04:00:00


Quote:
>I don't want to sound arrogant or stupid, but when did anyone
>actually enjoy drinking wine or a hot drink from a wooden goblet?

Apparently the writer has never drank a quality ale or mead from a wooden mug.
Beech lends a particlar taste and a tactile quality and warmth to the lips that
will never be available from glass or ceramic.
 
 
 

Food safe coatings.

Post by Steve Tiedma » Thu, 11 May 2000 04:00:00


Jason,

Think of this- oak barrels used to ferment wines and liquors are not
coated with anything, as far as I've ever heard.

A good dense hardwood such as beech or white oak or hard/rock maple
should be able to do the job without any coatings.  If using a coating,
esp. a varnish-like material, let it cure for several weeks or longer
before putting into use, to allow those solvents to really evaporate
out.  Forget shellac, ***s and acidic liquids (lemonade) will
dissolve shellac.

Try making one without finish and see how it performs for a few weeks.

Steve Tiedman

--------------------------

Quote:

> I am wondering what kinds of sealers/coatings would be safe for wood
> turned goblets and mugs for hot and cold drinks.

> Any suggestions?

> Jason E. Brown

> www.masterforge.com

 
 
 

Food safe coatings.

Post by Jason E. Bro » Thu, 11 May 2000 04:00:00


These suggestions have been very helpful, Thanks.  

I think I will experiment with different hardwoods without any stain
or sealer on the inside surfaces.  I have gotten used to the taste of
sawdust anyway ; )

Jason E. Brown

www.masterforge.com

 
 
 

Food safe coatings.

Post by Doug & Pat Blac » Thu, 11 May 2000 04:00:00


Anyone try the Belen or Mohawk  salad bowl finish, its marked food safe
 
 
 

Food safe coatings.

Post by Rick » Fri, 12 May 2000 04:00:00


Dear Gruserry, Actually I've probably never drunk a quality ale
or mead from anything at all! And, blow me down, is it true that
glass isn't a natural material? My comments weren't meant to be
very serious but ... when I drink wine, which I've usually paid a
fair bit for, the last thing I want is to pick up any extra
flavour or scent from whatever it is I'm drinking it from. I
guess I'm just a sucker for glass. Here's a question (or two):
What proportion of purchasers of wooden goblets actually use
their goblets to drink from, at all, or more than once? How many
people would actually choose to drink a hot drink from a wooden
mug? BTW, can you actually buy mead or is it something you have
to knock up in the

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Food safe coatings.

Post by Duncan R. Bel » Fri, 12 May 2000 04:00:00


This is getting to be an FAQ!

My view only - based on 10 years of making bowls and other treen for eating
hot and cold food out of, for 17th C. re-enactment: olive oil, rubbed in
well.

Not good for beer: if you have a beer mug, just put it in the mug (I'm
assuming you're using something suitably hardgrained), and let it slowly
filter through to your hand in the time-honoured way :)

Other people have frequently suggested polyurethane-based varnishes, and
various other oils.

Contrary to popular oponion, the olive oil doesn't go rancid (unlike
sunflower oil!), or smell - but we had interesting food in the 17th C. :)

Duncan R. Bell,
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-------



Quote:
> I am wondering what kinds of sealers/coatings would be safe for wood
> turned goblets and mugs for hot and cold drinks.

> Any suggestions?

> Jason E. Brown

> www.masterforge.com

 
 
 

Food safe coatings.

Post by Grusser » Fri, 12 May 2000 04:00:00


Regarding the number who buy a wine goblet to use for anything but decoration,
my guess would be few to none. So the natural wood finish that I use is
appropriate either way. However, beer drinkers are the opposite, and I  have
had many repeat customers for beer mugs.

For buying a commercial mead, it is available wherever there is an abundance of
micro-breweries, such as here in Washington State.
But, the best mead is brewed at home, just as it was centuries ago. I make an
excellent mead that is about 12% ***, and brewed with ginger root and
raspberries. The only problem is that it has to age for 2 years to mellow out
the flavors, but well worth the wait.

 
 
 

Food safe coatings.

Post by Georg » Fri, 12 May 2000 04:00:00


Glass is natural if you're close enough to a volcano or meteor strike to
grab it and blow.

So cooper up your goblet out of white oak, char the inside and enjoy your
wine.

If you're drinking beer from it - beech.  If you're British, it can only
improve the taste....


Quote:
> Dear Gruserry, Actually I've probably never drunk a quality ale
> or mead from anything at all! And, blow me down, is it true that
> glass isn't a natural material? My comments weren't meant to be
> very serious but ... when I drink wine, which I've usually paid a
> fair bit for, the last thing I want is to pick up any extra
> flavour or scent from whatever it is I'm drinking it from. I
> guess I'm just a sucker for glass. Here's a question (or two):
> What proportion of purchasers of wooden goblets actually use
> their goblets to drink from, at all, or more than once? How many
> people would actually choose to drink a hot drink from a wooden
> mug? BTW, can you actually buy mead or is it something you have
> to knock up in the

> * Sent from RemarQ http://www.remarq.com The Internet's Discussion Network
*
> The fastest and easiest way to search and participate in Usenet - Free!

 
 
 

Food safe coatings.

Post by C.L.Osbor » Sat, 13 May 2000 04:00:00


I've tried it but never swallowed it! (smiling)

--
***



Quote:
> Anyone try the Belen or Mohawk  salad bowl finish, its marked food safe

 
 
 

Food safe coatings.

Post by Marshall Gorr » Sat, 13 May 2000 04:00:00


Try mineral oil coated with beeswax. It is absolutely safe and can be
cleaned and renewed as needed. Use only enough to seal the wood.

I used that combination or straight mineral oil for direct contact with
food. It does have to be renewed on a regular basis if you are washing
the treen regularly.

May your next turning be your best,
Marshall

Marshall's Woodturning Homepage at
http://mgorrow.tripod.com/

 
 
 

Food safe coatings.

Post by Rex Hasli » Sat, 13 May 2000 04:00:00


Well come on then,  where is the recipe

Rex

Quote:
> Regarding the number who buy a wine goblet to use for anything but
decoration,
> my guess would be few to none. So the natural wood finish that I use is
> appropriate either way. However, beer drinkers are the opposite, and I
have
> had many repeat customers for beer mugs.

> For buying a commercial mead, it is available wherever there is an
abundance of
> micro-breweries, such as here in Washington State.
> But, the best mead is brewed at home, just as it was centuries ago. I make
an
> excellent mead that is about 12% ***, and brewed with ginger root and
> raspberries. The only problem is that it has to age for 2 years to mellow
out
> the flavors, but well worth the wait.

 
 
 

Food safe coatings.

Post by Rick » Sat, 13 May 2000 04:00:00


Now George, that's got to be right "if you're British it can only
improve the taste" although, don't you mean if the beer's
British?  And Grusserry (spelling right this time, sorry!),
thanks for the mead tip. I WILL try it!

R

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