Kelton Hollowers

Kelton Hollowers

Post by po.. » Fri, 09 Feb 2001 10:21:19



Anyone have any experience with these tools or know of a review ?

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Kelton Hollowers

Post by Nick Faymovill » Fri, 09 Feb 2001 11:57:34


Hey:

Don't know if you can consider me qualified because I just recently bought
the small set of Kelton Hollowers.  At this point I gotta say  -  I love em!
I have only done three or four fairly small pieces but I really like the way
they handle when they are extended out from the tool rest.  I got the set
mostly for enclosed hollow forms because I have the Termite Ring Tool for
open forms.  I have had the Termite for a couple of years and for end-grain
hollowing up to 8" deep it is a real wood waster.

Nick Faymoville
Bemidji, Minnesota

Quote:

> Anyone have any experience with these tools or know of a review ?

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Kelton Hollowers

Post by charles_vanleeu.. » Fri, 09 Feb 2001 12:56:42


My only personal experience is with the large set, doing big deep
stuff.  I like them.

I believe Steve Russell gave a very short review on this forum within
the last month or two.  Try searching back.

cvl

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Kelton Hollowers

Post by Rusty Myer » Fri, 09 Feb 2001 22:39:20


I've got a set of the large ones.  I've only used them a little bit, but
they do fit in my Stewart armbrace and my Jamieson rig.  So with the Kelton
handle, I have three options to use them.  I was a little worried because
the tip is moderately large compare to other hollowing tools, but they seem
to work fine.

--
Rusty Myers
Austin, TX

Quote:

> Anyone have any experience with these tools or know of a review ?

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Kelton Hollowers

Post by Steven D. Russel » Sat, 10 Feb 2001 13:49:26


Hello,

I have all three sets (small, medium and large) and use them frequently
in my production studio. As another poster mentioned, I posted a short
review not too long ago and have copied it below for your convenience.
I'm working on a full length article, but it is not finished. I would be
happy to answer any questions you have on these most impressive tools.
Take care and all the best to you and yours!

Using Kelton Hollowers and Shear Scrapers
By: Steven D. Russell
Eurowood Werks Woodturning Studio
The Woodlands, Texas ?2000

Kelton Hollowers
I have been using the small and medium size Kelton Hollowing tools in my
studio recently and I wanted to share some of my initial impressions of
these most impressive tools.  Hollow form turning or "blind turning" as
it is sometimes called, can be a difficult skill to master. However,
using superior quality hollowing tools can significantly shorten the
learning "curve".

In addition to being very easy to use, the surface "off the tool"
produced by the Kelton Hollowers, is far superior to that achieved from
my current hollowing system. The quality of the surface finish is so
good in fact, you save considerable time because you do not have to use
a teardrop scraper to smooth the interior of the form. The design of the
Kelton Hollowers   enables fast and efficient hollowing, while virtually
eliminating dig-ins and inadvertent wall penetrations. Dig-ins and
cutting through the wall of hollow forms are two of the biggest
challenges new turners face when hollowing.

The cutting tips feature a special metal alloy on the cutting surface
that holds its edge very well, even on abrasive timbers like Oak and
Mesquite. These Kelton Hollowing tools are a significant advancement in
hollow form turning and will allow novice woodturners to quickly master
the skills necessary to produce these elegant forms. The large hollowing
set features a ?" shaft, which fits the popular "torque arresting"
Jamieson D-style hollowing tool handle.

Kelton Shear Scrapers
I have been in "production" mode in the studio recently, working on
production and artistic bowls and platters. Typically, I use a modified
"Texas-Irish" grind on my bowl gouges that is very aggressive. This
fantastic grind offers maximum stock removal in the shortest amount of
time. However, with these advanced bevels, there are certain areas on
some pieces (with severe inner curves) that the gouge cannot effectively
reach. This is especially true with semi-enclosed forms, or those with
back cut inner rims. Shear scrapers can be an effective tool in these
areas, however many turners find it difficult to correctly apply shear
scraping techniques. In traditional shear scraping, you must orient the
shear angle (45-50) of the scraper by hand.

Most traditional scrapers have sharp 90 edges that make traversing
along the tool rest, a difficult proposition at best. In addition, you
must keep the scraper's shear angle in the correct position, whilst you
continue through your traverse up the bowl wall. The Kelton Shear
Scrapers feature unique milled flats, that automatically keeps the
cutting tip in the correct shear angle and allows tissue thin curls to
be removed. The pre-formed shear angle of 50 is virtually goof-proof
and allows turners to quickly learn and enjoy the benefits of shear
scraping.

The tool also offers a traditional round area on the shaft as well,
which offers maximum flexibility in using this superb tool. The small
version of the scraper is just right for exterior work on hollow forms,
shallow vessels and bowls. The heavy shaft of the large scraper is great
to use in deep vessels and dampens vibrations very effectively. I also
appreciate the ability to move the cutting tip, to suit particular grain
or figure challenges.

Sometimes, just a bit of movement (a few degrees more or less), is all
that is needed to tame a wild section of grain. The cutter offers dual
cutting tips with a round nose on one side and a flat nose on the
opposite side. Blank cutters are also available, that allow you to
custom grind profiles for particular challenges. To change or adjust the
tip profile you simply loosen the locking bolt, rotate the cutter head
to the desired profile and tighten the locking bolt.

I want to give the large scraper a go in tall slender boxes. I think, it
will be a great tool for box makers as well, allowing provocative new
designs to be easily achieved. Look for my comprehensive article on
using Kelton Hollowers and Shear Scrapers in the near future. As always,
if I can help you in any way, please do not hesitate to contact me at

endeavours!

--
Letting the chips fly...
Steven D. Russell
Eurowood Werks Woodturning Studio
The Woodlands, Texas

Website coming soon!

Quote:

> Anyone have any experience with these tools or know of a review ?

> Sent via Deja.com
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