Finishing advice please

Finishing advice please

Post by Art and Dian » Wed, 29 Nov 2000 04:00:00



I'm a pretty regular follower of the group but, alas, not all of what I
read sinks in, so I need advice on finishing my latest project.  As a
gift, I tried out the wallhanging project in the July 1999 issue of
Woodturning magazine (Take a piece of oak 28"x18"x2", turn a bullseye
pattern on it, rip it lengthwise in random widths, offset and switch
around all the pieces and glue it back together)  It came out great, by
my standards at least.
   I chose to use mineral oil as a finish to bring out the grain etc.
It's my first time with mineral oil and, so far, I like it.  The
questions now are:

- How long does it have to dry?
- How many coats?
- What kind of finish can I use over the oil as protection?  There are
many nooks and crannys that are really hard to get to, so I believe a
spray is in order.

   Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Art Learmonth

 
 
 

Finishing advice please

Post by Steve Tiedma » Wed, 29 Nov 2000 04:00:00


Hi Art,

Weeeelllll, got some news for you, mineral oil is not a curing oil, in
other words, it will never dry.  It may look dry on the surface, but what
is soaked in will never cure from a liquid into a solid, like tung oil and
linseed oil will.

I don't know if rubbing the surface with a solvent will help remove the oil
or not, if you choose to remove it.  I'm not sure if more coats will do
anything different to the first coat.  You could make sure all the excess
oil is off and rub a coat of wax over it and call it good.

I'm not sure any other kind of top coat over the mineral oil will be needed
for added protection.  Isn't this a wall***?  Nothing is going to be
damaging it, so something like varnish shouldn't be needed.  Let the wood
show through without a plastic top coat.

Steve Tiedman

-----------------------------

Quote:

> I'm a pretty regular follower of the group but, alas, not all of what I
> read sinks in, so I need advice on finishing my latest project.  As a
> gift, I tried out the wallhanging project in the July 1999 issue of
> Woodturning magazine (Take a piece of oak 28"x18"x2", turn a bullseye
> pattern on it, rip it lengthwise in random widths, offset and switch
> around all the pieces and glue it back together)  It came out great, by
> my standards at least.
>    I chose to use mineral oil as a finish to bring out the grain etc.
> It's my first time with mineral oil and, so far, I like it.  The
> questions now are:

> - How long does it have to dry?
> - How many coats?
> - What kind of finish can I use over the oil as protection?  There are
> many nooks and crannys that are really hard to get to, so I believe a
> spray is in order.

>    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

> Art Learmonth


 
 
 

Finishing advice please

Post by Steve Tiedma » Wed, 29 Nov 2000 04:00:00


Hiya Paul,

Just want to verify for the benefit of our viewing audience at home.  Are
you saying:

Sequence A-
1.  Remove mineral oil
2.  Barrier coat of shellac
3.  Linseed or tung oil
            OR
Sequence B-
1.  Remove mineral oil
2.  Linseed or tung oil
3.  Barrier coat of shellac

I ask because at the end, after oil application, you say "a barrier coat of
shellac first".

If you are saying Sequence A, I would offer that putting a penetrating
finish (tung and linseed oil) over the surface finish of shellac probably
is not the right choice.  If you are saying Sequence B, then all is well in
the world.  Or maybe I'm just reading things back-asswards.  Too much
pumpkin pie last week, I'm still recovering.

Steve Tiedman

-----------------------------

Quote:

> (chop)

> But if you want a different finish, I would suggest using mineral
> spirits or naptha or turpentine to remove as much mineral oil as
> possible.  Scrub it well, and use plenty of clean rags to wipe off as
> much as possible.  Let it dry.  Then start over with boiled linseed
> oil or tung oil.  These are drying oils.  Once your new oil has cured,
> you can topcoat with just about anything, but the safest choice is to
> apply a barrier coat of shellac first.  In your case, I would say that
> this is essential.  Apply at least one coat of shellac, preferably
> dewaxed (shellac in an aerosol can is dewaxed).  Then, you can build
> the finish from more shellac, or you can use lacquer or anything else.

> Hope that helps,

> Paul Rad

 
 
 

Finishing advice please

Post by Bill Pound » Wed, 29 Nov 2000 04:00:00


Regarding mineral oil, we had a demonstrator at our guild on Saturday.  He
uses baby oil from the 99 cent store, mixed 50/50 with mineral spirits.
According to him (a retired Dentist, so he has some chemistry training),
baby oil is just mineral oil with fragrance added.  The mineral spirits of
course just make it penetrate better.  After a couple days of drying
(actually just soaking in since it doesn't dry), he adds a top coat of
Trewax and buffs.

I tried a couple of boxes and used the technique.  Oh, BTW, he wet sands
with the mixture as well.  I haven't added the wax coat yet, but the boxes
are very nice, and are dry to the touch.  I'm certain that a bit of carnuba
buffed on will look nice.

Regarding your questions, just let it penetrate until it is dry to the
touch.  I don't think more than a single drenching coat will be of any
benefit.  Yes you can spray it on or use a squirt bottle.  Better yet, just
flood it on with a brush or rag.  You cannot get too much on it.  It will
just drip off or penetrate.  Wipe it dry after a few minutes.  A day or two
and then buff on some wax.

In my opinion, this is not a finish at all.  But the oil does pop the grain
figure nicely.  Then the wax gives a small amount of protection and gloss.
Best of all, it's easy.

Good luck,

--
Bill Pounds
http://www.bill.pounds.net/woodshop



Quote:
> I'm a pretty regular follower of the group but, alas, not all of what I
> read sinks in, so I need advice on finishing my latest project.  As a
> gift, I tried out the wallhanging project in the July 1999 issue of
> Woodturning magazine (Take a piece of oak 28"x18"x2", turn a bullseye
> pattern on it, rip it lengthwise in random widths, offset and switch
> around all the pieces and glue it back together)  It came out great, by
> my standards at least.
>    I chose to use mineral oil as a finish to bring out the grain etc.
> It's my first time with mineral oil and, so far, I like it.  The
> questions now are:

> - How long does it have to dry?
> - How many coats?
> - What kind of finish can I use over the oil as protection?  There are
> many nooks and crannys that are really hard to get to, so I believe a
> spray is in order.

>    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

> Art Learmonth

 
 
 

Finishing advice please

Post by Paul T. Radovani » Thu, 30 Nov 2000 11:41:44


Quote:

>   I chose to use mineral oil as a finish to bring out the grain etc.
>It's my first time with mineral oil and, so far, I like it.  The
>questions now are:

>- How long does it have to dry?

Mineral oil will never, ever dry.  Ever.  When used on food-contact
surface, it is lost by handling, washing, and a small amount migrates
through the wood -- but it never dries.

Quote:
>- How many coats?

If you are going to use mineral oil, apply enough to saturate the
wood, let soak a while, then wipe off the excess.  It is then
re-applied whenever it needs to be renewed.

Quote:
>- What kind of finish can I use over the oil as protection?  There are
>many nooks and crannys that are really hard to get to, so I believe a
>spray is in order.

The only thing that you can really apply on top of mineral oil is wax.

But if you want a different finish, I would suggest using mineral
spirits or naptha or turpentine to remove as much mineral oil as
possible.  Scrub it well, and use plenty of clean rags to wipe off as
much as possible.  Let it dry.  Then start over with boiled linseed
oil or tung oil.  These are drying oils.  Once your new oil has cured,
you can topcoat with just about anything, but the safest choice is to
apply a barrier coat of shellac first.  In your case, I would say that
this is essential.  Apply at least one coat of shellac, preferably
dewaxed (shellac in an aerosol can is dewaxed).  Then, you can build
the finish from more shellac, or you can use lacquer or anything else.

Hope that helps,

Paul Rad

 
 
 

Finishing advice please

Post by Paul T. Radovani » Thu, 30 Nov 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

>Hiya Paul,

Howdy!

Quote:
>Just want to verify for the benefit of our viewing audience at home.  Are
>you saying:

>Sequence A-
>1.  Remove mineral oil
>2.  Barrier coat of shellac
>3.  Linseed or tung oil
>            OR
>Sequence B-
>1.  Remove mineral oil
>2.  Linseed or tung oil
>3.  Barrier coat of shellac

Well, I was saying "B", but see below.

Quote:
>I ask because at the end, after oil application, you say "a barrier coat of
>shellac first".

I meant to say to use the shellac before applying any other
film-forming topcoat.  Shellac's sealing ability is legendary.

Quote:
>If you are saying Sequence A, I would offer that putting a penetrating
>finish (tung and linseed oil) over the surface finish of shellac probably
>is not the right choice.  

I see your point, but there's more to the story, since you brought it
up.

There are a few cases where it is possible, even desirable, to apply a
drying oil such as linseed or tung oil on top of shellac.

First -- the caveat:  You should *not* "sandwich" oil between layers
of shellac.  This will cause aggravation that you don't need in your
life.

Now, as to your point of using "penetrating" oil on top of shellac; a
couple thoughts.

My favorite use for oil is to use it as a "penetrating" oil -- applied
to raw wood so that it soaks in and pops the grain, adding depth.

But all drying oils also have some ability to "build".  Some build
faster than others, depending on the resin content -- danish oils &
polymerized oils build faster than pure tung oil or linseed oil -- but
even tung & linseed will build in layers.

The first question is how much shellac is necessary to completely seal
the wood?  That will vary.  But my main point is that you could apply
a thin washcoat of shellac -- say a half-pound cut flooded on the wood
and immediately wiped dry -- this would accomplish some sealing.  Wait
five minutes and sand, then it is entirely possible to apply a drying
oil and get a good result.  In fact, you would get a finish that would
be similar to having applied several coats of the oil, because the
shellac would form a base from which to build the oil finish.

The second case where it can be desirable to apply oil on top of
shellac involves a true, built-up film finish of shellac.  Say you
have brushed or sprayed on a film of a thickness of 4 mils.  Then you
rub it out with various abrasives to a satin sheen.  It looks great
most of the time, except that in low-angle light, like early-morning
or late-evening sun, the scratch pattern of your satin rub stands out
in an unattractive way.  In this case, you can rub a drying oil into
the finish and squeegee *most* of it off, leaving just enough to fill
in and level the scratches.  This will dampen the stark look of the
scratches in that low-angle light.  I learned this from Jeff Jewitt,
and it's a great technique.

Quote:
>If you are saying Sequence B, then all is well in
>the world.  Or maybe I'm just reading things back-asswards.  Too much
>pumpkin pie last week, I'm still recovering.

Heh.  Your point is well-taken.  It's possible to use oil on top of
shellac, but it should be done carefully and in the right context.

Paul Rad

 
 
 

Finishing advice please

Post by Bill Da » Thu, 30 Nov 2000 04:00:00


If there was a way to put a PERMANENT post in the newsgroup saying "Do
NOT use mineral oil unless you have a very specific need for a sticky,
non-drying surface", I would vote for it!....There are a  VERY few
reasonable uses for mineral oil...Because it is non-toxic on salad
bowls, every new woodworker/turner seems to hear about it and thinks
it may be a cheap, easy way to treat wood!  

There is seldom a week goes by that someone doesn't start a new thread
asking how to use mineral oil, or how to finish OVER mineral oil...and
every week, a few try to explain how much better other methods
are....I guess it is hopeless...*grin*............

........................what, ME? Opionated?

.............................



Quote:
>Regarding mineral oil, we had a demonstrator at our guild on Saturday.  He
>uses baby oil from the 99 cent store, mixed 50/50 with mineral spirits.
>According to him (a retired Dentist, so he has some chemistry training),
>baby oil is just mineral oil with fragrance added.  The mineral spirits of
>course just make it penetrate better.  After a couple days of drying
>(actually just soaking in since it doesn't dry), he adds a top coat of
>Trewax and buffs.

>I tried a couple of boxes and used the technique.  Oh, BTW, he wet sands
>with the mixture as well.  I haven't added the wax coat yet, but the boxes
>are very nice, and are dry to the touch.  I'm certain that a bit of carnuba
>buffed on will look nice.

>Regarding your questions, just let it penetrate until it is dry to the
>touch.  I don't think more than a single drenching coat will be of any
>benefit.  Yes you can spray it on or use a squirt bottle.  Better yet, just
>flood it on with a brush or rag.  You cannot get too much on it.  It will
>just drip off or penetrate.  Wipe it dry after a few minutes.  A day or two
>and then buff on some wax.

>In my opinion, this is not a finish at all.  But the oil does pop the grain
>figure nicely.  Then the wax gives a small amount of protection and gloss.
>Best of all, it's easy.

>Good luck,

remove BALDERDASH for email reply
 
 
 

Finishing advice please

Post by Steve Tiedma » Thu, 30 Nov 2000 04:00:00


Paul,

Thanks for the clarification!  I'm saving this post in the "woodturning" file.

Steve T.
-----------

Quote:


> >Hiya Paul,

> Howdy!

> >Just want to verify for the benefit of our viewing audience at home.  Are
> >you saying:

> >Sequence A-
> >1.  Remove mineral oil
> >2.  Barrier coat of shellac
> >3.  Linseed or tung oil
> >            OR
> >Sequence B-
> >1.  Remove mineral oil
> >2.  Linseed or tung oil
> >3.  Barrier coat of shellac

> Well, I was saying "B", but see below.

> >I ask because at the end, after oil application, you say "a barrier coat of
> >shellac first".

> I meant to say to use the shellac before applying any other
> film-forming topcoat.  Shellac's sealing ability is legendary.

> >If you are saying Sequence A, I would offer that putting a penetrating
> >finish (tung and linseed oil) over the surface finish of shellac probably
> >is not the right choice.

> I see your point, but there's more to the story, since you brought it
> up.

> There are a few cases where it is possible, even desirable, to apply a
> drying oil such as linseed or tung oil on top of shellac.

> First -- the caveat:  You should *not* "sandwich" oil between layers
> of shellac.  This will cause aggravation that you don't need in your
> life.

> Now, as to your point of using "penetrating" oil on top of shellac; a
> couple thoughts.

> My favorite use for oil is to use it as a "penetrating" oil -- applied
> to raw wood so that it soaks in and pops the grain, adding depth.

> But all drying oils also have some ability to "build".  Some build
> faster than others, depending on the resin content -- danish oils &
> polymerized oils build faster than pure tung oil or linseed oil -- but
> even tung & linseed will build in layers.

> The first question is how much shellac is necessary to completely seal
> the wood?  That will vary.  But my main point is that you could apply
> a thin washcoat of shellac -- say a half-pound cut flooded on the wood
> and immediately wiped dry -- this would accomplish some sealing.  Wait
> five minutes and sand, then it is entirely possible to apply a drying
> oil and get a good result.  In fact, you would get a finish that would
> be similar to having applied several coats of the oil, because the
> shellac would form a base from which to build the oil finish.

> The second case where it can be desirable to apply oil on top of
> shellac involves a true, built-up film finish of shellac.  Say you
> have brushed or sprayed on a film of a thickness of 4 mils.  Then you
> rub it out with various abrasives to a satin sheen.  It looks great
> most of the time, except that in low-angle light, like early-morning
> or late-evening sun, the scratch pattern of your satin rub stands out
> in an unattractive way.  In this case, you can rub a drying oil into
> the finish and squeegee *most* of it off, leaving just enough to fill
> in and level the scratches.  This will dampen the stark look of the
> scratches in that low-angle light.  I learned this from Jeff Jewitt,
> and it's a great technique.

> >If you are saying Sequence B, then all is well in
> >the world.  Or maybe I'm just reading things back-asswards.  Too much
> >pumpkin pie last week, I'm still recovering.

> Heh.  Your point is well-taken.  It's possible to use oil on top of
> shellac, but it should be done carefully and in the right context.

> Paul Rad

 
 
 

Finishing advice please

Post by Art and Dian » Fri, 01 Dec 2000 04:00:00


Bill

   I guess I have to appologize for asking for some help with my finishing
question.  After 7 years of woodturning, I guess I chose the wrong time to
finally try mineral oil.  I certainly didn't mean to offend anyone.  I thought
getting advice might be one of the purposes of participating in this group.  I
didn't realize it was only for those who know it all already.  I think I
mentioned in my post that I had read about mineral oil, but didn't remember all
the details.

   I've read posts in the past from people who had legitimate questions
regarding subjects that I felt were pretty basic knowledge.  I've noticed that
there are people, like Fred Holder and many others, who constantly re-explain
"What's the first tools I should buy?" or "How do I keep the logs from the tree
my neighbor just cut down and gave me from splitting?"  Although the answers
have been repeated many times, I admire these men and women for their
everlasting patience and I just go on to the next message. I guess I never
realized the great sport I could have had, responding in a manner that tries to
make the questioner feel stupid.  All this time I could have been pumping up my
self esteem and all at someone elses expense.  Life just doesn't get any better
than that!

   For all the rest of you who thoughtfully offered constructive advice on how
to try to overcome my error, I give you my thanks.  It is you who make this
group what it is and 1 or 2 jackasses can't diminish the good you do for the
craft of woodturning.

Art

Quote:

> If there was a way to put a PERMANENT post in the newsgroup saying "Do
> NOT use mineral oil unless you have a very specific need for a sticky,
> non-drying surface", I would vote for it!....There are a  VERY few
> reasonable uses for mineral oil...Because it is non-toxic on salad
> bowls, every new woodworker/turner seems to hear about it and thinks
> it may be a cheap, easy way to treat wood!

> There is seldom a week goes by that someone doesn't start a new thread
> asking how to use mineral oil, or how to finish OVER mineral oil...and
> every week, a few try to explain how much better other methods
> are....I guess it is hopeless...*grin*............

> ........................what, ME? Opionated?

> .............................



> >Regarding mineral oil, we had a demonstrator at our guild on Saturday.  He
> >uses baby oil from the 99 cent store, mixed 50/50 with mineral spirits.
> >According to him (a retired Dentist, so he has some chemistry training),
> >baby oil is just mineral oil with fragrance added.  The mineral spirits of
> >course just make it penetrate better.  After a couple days of drying
> >(actually just soaking in since it doesn't dry), he adds a top coat of
> >Trewax and buffs.

> >I tried a couple of boxes and used the technique.  Oh, BTW, he wet sands
> >with the mixture as well.  I haven't added the wax coat yet, but the boxes
> >are very nice, and are dry to the touch.  I'm certain that a bit of carnuba
> >buffed on will look nice.

> >Regarding your questions, just let it penetrate until it is dry to the
> >touch.  I don't think more than a single drenching coat will be of any
> >benefit.  Yes you can spray it on or use a squirt bottle.  Better yet, just
> >flood it on with a brush or rag.  You cannot get too much on it.  It will
> >just drip off or penetrate.  Wipe it dry after a few minutes.  A day or two
> >and then buff on some wax.

> >In my opinion, this is not a finish at all.  But the oil does pop the grain
> >figure nicely.  Then the wax gives a small amount of protection and gloss.
> >Best of all, it's easy.

> >Good luck,

> remove BALDERDASH for email reply

 
 
 

Finishing advice please

Post by Bill Da » Sat, 02 Dec 2000 04:00:00


*sigh*...I certainly had no intention of trying to make you, or anyone
else feel dumb, offended or ridiculed...I re-read my post, and I can
see that it had a bit of 'air of superiority', and for that I do
apoplgize....I could have made my point in a gentler way. Or I could
have just let the more patient among us deal with it....I 'think' than
in a group standing around in person, just talking, I would have said
it better. I was tired and grumpy from a long day (no excuse) and just
picked the wrong time to read another thread on mineral oil.....

Advice remains the same...testy response is withdrawn....and I will
use your reply to remind me that we all need some help without
over-done remarks at times.....again, my apologies for the tone.

Bill...

.......................

On Thu, 30 Nov 2000 19:34:20 -0600, Art and Diane

Quote:

>Bill

>   I guess I have to appologize for asking for some help with my finishing
>question.  After 7 years of woodturning, I guess I chose the wrong time to
>finally try mineral oil.  I certainly didn't mean to offend anyone.  I thought
>getting advice might be one of the purposes of participating in this group.  I
>didn't realize it was only for those who know it all already.  I think I
>mentioned in my post that I had read about mineral oil, but didn't remember all
>the details.

>   I've read posts in the past from people who had legitimate questions
>regarding subjects that I felt were pretty basic knowledge.  I've noticed that
>there are people, like Fred Holder and many others, who constantly re-explain
>"What's the first tools I should buy?" or "How do I keep the logs from the tree
>my neighbor just cut down and gave me from splitting?"  Although the answers
>have been repeated many times, I admire these men and women for their
>everlasting patience and I just go on to the next message. I guess I never
>realized the great sport I could have had, responding in a manner that tries to
>make the questioner feel stupid.  All this time I could have been pumping up my
>self esteem and all at someone elses expense.  Life just doesn't get any better
>than that!

>   For all the rest of you who thoughtfully offered constructive advice on how
>to try to overcome my error, I give you my thanks.  It is you who make this
>group what it is and 1 or 2 jackasses can't diminish the good you do for the
>craft of woodturning.

>Art


>> If there was a way to put a PERMANENT post in the newsgroup saying "Do
>> NOT use mineral oil unless you have a very specific need for a sticky,
>> non-drying surface", I would vote for it!....There are a  VERY few
>> reasonable uses for mineral oil...Because it is non-toxic on salad
>> bowls, every new woodworker/turner seems to hear about it and thinks
>> it may be a cheap, easy way to treat wood!

>> There is seldom a week goes by that someone doesn't start a new thread
>> asking how to use mineral oil, or how to finish OVER mineral oil...and
>> every week, a few try to explain how much better other methods
>> are....I guess it is hopeless...*grin*............

>> ........................what, ME? Opionated?

>> .............................



>> >Regarding mineral oil, we had a demonstrator at our guild on Saturday.  He
>> >uses baby oil from the 99 cent store, mixed 50/50 with mineral spirits.
>> >According to him (a retired Dentist, so he has some chemistry training),
>> >baby oil is just mineral oil with fragrance added.  The mineral spirits of
>> >course just make it penetrate better.  After a couple days of drying
>> >(actually just soaking in since it doesn't dry), he adds a top coat of
>> >Trewax and buffs.

>> >I tried a couple of boxes and used the technique.  Oh, BTW, he wet sands
>> >with the mixture as well.  I haven't added the wax coat yet, but the boxes
>> >are very nice, and are dry to the touch.  I'm certain that a bit of carnuba
>> >buffed on will look nice.

>> >Regarding your questions, just let it penetrate until it is dry to the
>> >touch.  I don't think more than a single drenching coat will be of any
>> >benefit.  Yes you can spray it on or use a squirt bottle.  Better yet, just
>> >flood it on with a brush or rag.  You cannot get too much on it.  It will
>> >just drip off or penetrate.  Wipe it dry after a few minutes.  A day or two
>> >and then buff on some wax.

>> >In my opinion, this is not a finish at all.  But the oil does pop the grain
>> >figure nicely.  Then the wax gives a small amount of protection and gloss.
>> >Best of all, it's easy.

>> >Good luck,

>> remove BALDERDASH for email reply

remove BALDERDASH for email reply
 
 
 

Finishing advice please

Post by Bill Pound » Sat, 02 Dec 2000 04:00:00


We all have those days Bill.  And you are correct, things don't sound the
same when we read them.  Good of you to soften those sharp corners for us.

Even so, I would say that mineral oil is not a finish at all.  But there are
those who swear that it is useful and seem to like the effect.  Others say
that wax is no finish at all either, and I'd start disagreeing there.

There are some professionals who use mineral oil, which implies some people
will buy stuff finished with it.  Maybe just advising folks of the downside
to using it might be more reasonable.
--
Bill Pounds
http://www.bill.pounds.net/woodshop


Quote:
> *sigh*...I certainly had no intention of trying to make you, or anyone
> else feel dumb, offended or ridiculed...I re-read my post, and I can
> see that it had a bit of 'air of superiority', and for that I do
> apoplgize....I could have made my point in a gentler way. Or I could
> have just let the more patient among us deal with it....I 'think' than
> in a group standing around in person, just talking, I would have said
> it better. I was tired and grumpy from a long day (no excuse) and just
> picked the wrong time to read another thread on mineral oil.....

> Advice remains the same...testy response is withdrawn....and I will
> use your reply to remind me that we all need some help without
> over-done remarks at times.....again, my apologies for the tone.

> Bill...

> .......................

> On Thu, 30 Nov 2000 19:34:20 -0600, Art and Diane

> >Bill

> >   I guess I have to appologize for asking for some help with my
finishing
> >question.  After 7 years of woodturning, I guess I chose the wrong time
to
> >finally try mineral oil.  I certainly didn't mean to offend anyone.  I
thought
> >getting advice might be one of the purposes of participating in this
group.  I
> >didn't realize it was only for those who know it all already.  I think I
> >mentioned in my post that I had read about mineral oil, but didn't
remember all
> >the details.

> >   I've read posts in the past from people who had legitimate questions
> >regarding subjects that I felt were pretty basic knowledge.  I've noticed
that
> >there are people, like Fred Holder and many others, who constantly
re-explain
> >"What's the first tools I should buy?" or "How do I keep the logs from
the tree
> >my neighbor just cut down and gave me from splitting?"  Although the
answers
> >have been repeated many times, I admire these men and women for their
> >everlasting patience and I just go on to the next message. I guess I
never
> >realized the great sport I could have had, responding in a manner that
tries to
> >make the questioner feel stupid.  All this time I could have been pumping
up my
> >self esteem and all at someone elses expense.  Life just doesn't get any
better
> >than that!

> >   For all the rest of you who thoughtfully offered constructive advice
on how
> >to try to overcome my error, I give you my thanks.  It is you who make
this
> >group what it is and 1 or 2 jackasses can't diminish the good you do for
the
> >craft of woodturning.

> >Art


> >> If there was a way to put a PERMANENT post in the newsgroup saying "Do
> >> NOT use mineral oil unless you have a very specific need for a sticky,
> >> non-drying surface", I would vote for it!....There are a  VERY few
> >> reasonable uses for mineral oil...Because it is non-toxic on salad
> >> bowls, every new woodworker/turner seems to hear about it and thinks
> >> it may be a cheap, easy way to treat wood!

> >> There is seldom a week goes by that someone doesn't start a new thread
> >> asking how to use mineral oil, or how to finish OVER mineral oil...and
> >> every week, a few try to explain how much better other methods
> >> are....I guess it is hopeless...*grin*............

> >> ........................what, ME? Opionated?

> >> .............................



> >> >Regarding mineral oil, we had a demonstrator at our guild on Saturday.
He
> >> >uses baby oil from the 99 cent store, mixed 50/50 with mineral
spirits.
> >> >According to him (a retired Dentist, so he has some chemistry
training),
> >> >baby oil is just mineral oil with fragrance added.  The mineral
spirits of
> >> >course just make it penetrate better.  After a couple days of drying
> >> >(actually just soaking in since it doesn't dry), he adds a top coat of
> >> >Trewax and buffs.

> >> >I tried a couple of boxes and used the technique.  Oh, BTW, he wet
sands
> >> >with the mixture as well.  I haven't added the wax coat yet, but the
boxes
> >> >are very nice, and are dry to the touch.  I'm certain that a bit of
carnuba
> >> >buffed on will look nice.

> >> >Regarding your questions, just let it penetrate until it is dry to the
> >> >touch.  I don't think more than a single drenching coat will be of any
> >> >benefit.  Yes you can spray it on or use a squirt bottle.  Better yet,
just
> >> >flood it on with a brush or rag.  You cannot get too much on it.  It
will
> >> >just drip off or penetrate.  Wipe it dry after a few minutes.  A day
or two
> >> >and then buff on some wax.

> >> >In my opinion, this is not a finish at all.  But the oil does pop the
grain
> >> >figure nicely.  Then the wax gives a small amount of protection and
gloss.
> >> >Best of all, it's easy.

> >> >Good luck,

> >> remove BALDERDASH for email reply

> remove BALDERDASH for email reply

 
 
 

Finishing advice please

Post by Arc » Sat, 02 Dec 2000 04:00:00


Hi Art,   There are not very many "always" or "nevers" or absolute
rules in our art/craft. Try mineral oil and wax, vaseline, margarine,
shoe polish or whatever you fancy except poisons and noxious things. If
you like it use it, and forget chemistry,physics and my advice. If you
don't like the "non finish" then eat the edibles. shine your shoes,
grease  the lathe bed or lubricate your innards with what's left over. I
suspect that with your experience part of the reason for your question
was to raise an issue for others to profit from. Keep asking. We need to
learn, Please no flames as I plan to try a very low flash point finish
on a highly flammable bowl! <G>  Regards,   Arch

                   Fortiter,

 
 
 

Finishing advice please

Post by scott swag » Sun, 03 Dec 2000 04:00:00


You already have the mineral oil on this piece, but for your future
finishing adventures, this site has long been one of my favorites;
http://members.aol.com/woodinfo1/salpage.htm

Sal has since retired, but his site is still very informative..

Best of Luck
LIONSEYES

 
 
 

Finishing advice please

Post by Wood Turn » Mon, 04 Dec 2000 04:00:00


mineral oil never dries, shellac works well as a sealer for oil
finishes.  

Spy in Hawaii  (Maui)

dba: Waipoli Woods
Secret Identity:  Ji Fay  (don't tell anyone, or else...)