New Shop floor ??

New Shop floor ??

Post by gmcco » Sat, 18 Jan 2003 13:49:27



The wife finally told me to build a new shop ,18 x30 on a cement slab. I was
considering  using plywood over some type of styrifoam for half of the floor
area so I would not have to be standing on a cold cement floor. Any
suggestions would be great.
Thanks for the help. Gary
 
 
 

New Shop floor ??

Post by DJ Delori » Sat, 18 Jan 2003 14:27:59


Radiant heat?  Then you can stand on a warm cement floor ;-)

 
 
 

New Shop floor ??

Post by Bob Strigh » Sat, 18 Jan 2003 20:00:06


That's what I did on the basis of suggestions in workshop books, and am glad
that I did. Besides the temperature, it's a lot easier standing for long
periods compared to the concrete slab.

Quote:
> The wife finally told me to build a new shop ,18 x30 on a cement slab. I
was
> considering  using plywood over some type of styrifoam for half of the
floor
> area so I would not have to be standing on a cold cement floor. Any
> suggestions would be great.
> Thanks for the help. Gary

 
 
 

New Shop floor ??

Post by Dan Bollinge » Sat, 18 Jan 2003 22:14:01


Quote:
> I was
> considering  using plywood over some type of styrifoam for half of the
floor
> area so I would not have to be standing on a cold cement floor.

Over the concrete, right?  I use *** mats instead.  I can lift them for
cleaning.

Rather than an unfinished plywood floor that will eventually shred and
splinter I'd look at what industry uses.  *** floor tiles about 3/4"
thick that join with the next tile to form a continous *** mat.

Also, I use good shoes with orthotics and this makes a great difference.
Dan

 
 
 

New Shop floor ??

Post by Bill Mach » Sat, 18 Jan 2003 23:26:01


Check into a product called "Delta FL".  You can easily find it with a
google search.  It is a dimpled plastic material that comes in rolls
and is designed to do just what you want.  I have it in my shop and am
well satisfied

Bill

Quote:

> The wife finally told me to build a new shop ,18 x30 on a cement slab. I was
> considering  using plywood over some type of styrifoam for half of the floor
> area so I would not have to be standing on a cold cement floor. Any
> suggestions would be great.
> Thanks for the help. Gary

 
 
 

New Shop floor ??

Post by Dan Bollinge » Sat, 18 Jan 2003 23:28:31


I have seen a sample of that.  It looks very comfortable and easy to sweep
clean.


Quote:
> Check into a product called "Delta FL".  You can easily find it with a
> google search.  It is a dimpled plastic material that comes in rolls
> and is designed to do just what you want.  I have it in my shop and am
> well satisfied

> Bill




Quote:
> > The wife finally told me to build a new shop ,18 x30 on a cement slab. I
was
> > considering  using plywood over some type of styrifoam for half of the
floor
> > area so I would not have to be standing on a cold cement floor. Any
> > suggestions would be great.
> > Thanks for the help. Gary

 
 
 

New Shop floor ??

Post by Fred Bearma » Sat, 18 Jan 2003 23:45:05


I came across this product yesterday at bennyswoodworks.com, the link to
their Delta-FL page is http://www.bennyswoodworks.com/delta_fl/index.html

I am finishing a shop in my allocated portion of the garage (SWMBO still
insists own keeping a car in her portion - go figure!), came across this and
found it pretty interesting.   I would guess that you have it down with a
plywood floor over it.  Do your heavier machines sink down a little.  Looks
to be a good answer.

Fred Bearman
Port Huron, Michigan


Quote:
> Check into a product called "Delta FL".  I have it in my shop and am
> well satisfied

 
 
 

New Shop floor ??

Post by Russell Seat » Sun, 19 Jan 2003 00:08:42


Be sure to put a heavy sheet of plastic below the concrete slab to
keep out moisture.  And put 2 inches of styrofoam under the slab to
insulate it and keep the cold out.  For the floor above the concrete,
the plywood covering over part of the shop floor is good.  If you put
insulation underneath the slab you don't have to put it above the slab
too.  Put thin battens under the plywood to provide an air gap.  This
is to allow the plywood to flex and provide the cushioning affect.
Plywood directly on top of the slab would not give and would not
provide any additional comfort.  Use 1/4" plywood for the battens so
your plywood floor is not too high.  You can vary the placement of the
strips depending on how much bounce you want in the plywood floor.  Or
vary the spacing depending on how thick of plywood you get.  1/2"
thick plywood would require closer spacing of course.  Also consider
the tongue and grooved plywood ($20 each for 3/4" underlayment
plywood) to lock everything together and keep dust from falling
through the gaps.
Quote:

> The wife finally told me to build a new shop ,18 x30 on a cement slab. I was
> considering  using plywood over some type of styrifoam for half of the floor
> area so I would not have to be standing on a cold cement floor. Any
> suggestions would be great.
> Thanks for the help. Gary

 
 
 

New Shop floor ??

Post by Derek Hartzel » Sat, 18 Jan 2003 16:37:48


Heat the shop and put foam under the slab floor so the slab is not touching
the cold ground.
 
 
 

New Shop floor ??

Post by Dan Bollinge » Sun, 19 Jan 2003 01:37:23


According to a commonly used Architecture book, for most of the US, one only
has to insulate the foundation and the first 2' under the concrete floor.
After that the insulation has very little cost-to-benefit. Dan


Quote:
> Heat the shop and put foam under the slab floor so the slab is not
touching
> the cold ground.

 
 
 

New Shop floor ??

Post by Bill Mach » Sun, 19 Jan 2003 04:29:35


Mine is covered with 3/4" plywood (can't remember the exact name but
it's the stuff that is used for concrete forms nd thus already has an
oil finish on it).  The plywood is not tongue and groove so there is
some minor mismatch occasionally at seams and corners.  I haven't
noticed any sinking after about 3 years, although there may be some.

One of the nice things about the Delta FL is that in addition to
providing air space and thus some cushioning, it is also a vapor
barrier.  I wouldn't take this to the bank, but I seem to remember
that its load bearing capacity is something like 200 pounds per square
foot.

Hope this helps

Bill

Quote:

> I came across this product yesterday at bennyswoodworks.com, the link to
> their Delta-FL page is http://www.bennyswoodworks.com/delta_fl/index.html

> I am finishing a shop in my allocated portion of the garage (SWMBO still
> insists own keeping a car in her portion - go figure!), came across this and
> found it pretty interesting.   I would guess that you have it down with a
> plywood floor over it.  Do your heavier machines sink down a little.  Looks
> to be a good answer.

> Fred Bearman
> Port Huron, Michigan



> > Check into a product called "Delta FL".  I have it in my shop and am
> > well satisfied

 
 
 

New Shop floor ??

Post by Derek Hartzel » Sun, 19 Jan 2003 04:29:55


I suspect comfort would still be better with a completely insulated floor,
even if the inside was only insulated with 1" foam.
 
 
 

New Shop floor ??

Post by Dan Bollinge » Sun, 19 Jan 2003 04:43:30


Quote:
> but I seem to remember
> that its load bearing capacity is something like 200 pounds per square
> foot.
> Bill

Onloy 200#?  That's puny.  I suspect that is the design load when applied
horizontally and spanning joists 16" O.C.    Applied directly to concrete it
would be measured in thousands of pounds per square foot.  Dan
 
 
 

New Shop floor ??

Post by Darr » Sun, 19 Jan 2003 07:30:45


Quote:

> I suspect comfort would still be better with a completely insulated floor,
> even if the inside was only insulated with 1" foam.

My Son-In-Law built his home with a heated floor. He has hot water
base board heat. Modified the floor to have tubing run in the concrete
slab. The hot water boiler water is diverted through the tubing by
thermostat. Works wonders and is cheap. I often wonder hwat that would
be like in a shop.....Darryl
 
 
 

New Shop floor ??

Post by David Shomber » Sun, 19 Jan 2003 12:59:26


My shop is in the house, on a concrete slab, at ground level. I don't have a
problem with moisture or cold, but if I had this to do over I would have a
wood floor (on joists) instead of concrete. Then I could run wiring and dust
collector ductwork under it. Well, too late. I'm interested in this Delta FL
stuff.  Is it OK to set a six hundred pound lathe on it?  Will it stand up
to solvents like mineral spirits being spilled on it?  I'd really like to
hear from anyone who's actually used it.

Dave Shombert
Elkins, WV