Mortar coating ?

Mortar coating ?

Post by Denis Marie » Sat, 13 Mar 2004 04:36:16



I just completed a wooden mortar.
I wonder what coating to apply.

--
Denis
Sprucewood, Rothesay, N.B

 
 
 

Mortar coating ?

Post by AHilto » Sat, 13 Mar 2004 04:52:02


What wood is it made of?  Is it actually going to get used ... light,
medium, heavy usage?

- Andrew


Quote:
> I just completed a wooden mortar.
> I wonder what coating to apply.

> --
> Denis
> Sprucewood, Rothesay, N.B


 
 
 

Mortar coating ?

Post by Denis Marie » Sat, 13 Mar 2004 05:05:10


The mortar is made out of maple.  At this time, we occasionally use a marble
mortar.  The wooden one is an experiment.  It usage will be light.  If it is
not working good it will end up as a decorative piece.


Quote:
> What wood is it made of?  Is it actually going to get used ... light,
> medium, heavy usage?

> - Andrew



> > I just completed a wooden mortar.
> > I wonder what coating to apply.

> > --
> > Denis
> > Sprucewood, Rothesay, N.B

 
 
 

Mortar coating ?

Post by Bob Pritcha » Sat, 13 Mar 2004 06:57:59


Hi Denis, If it's hard maple I wouldn't use any finish at all. Sanded to a
higher grit hard maple shines up nicely.

Quote:
>The mortar is made out of maple.  At this time, we occasionally use a marble
>mortar.  The wooden one is an experiment.  It usage will be light.  If it is
>not working good it will end up as a decorative piece.

Bob, Naugatuck Ct.
http://www.outofcontrol-woodturning.com
 
 
 

Mortar coating ?

Post by AHilto » Sat, 13 Mar 2004 07:06:30


If you're going to just be mushing up herbs and other soft things, then
simply leaving the maple bare should be fine.  It'll stain of course.
That's why most, at least here in the midwest, of the old mortar/pestles
were made of walnut.... you couldn't see the stain and it was hard (not to
mention plentiful).  They also didn't care much if it did get stained. It
was a utilitarian item.

If you're going to be pulverizing seeds, peppercorns, pills and other hard
stuff, the maple is too soft and it'll pit or simply have some of these
small particles stick to it as the dig into the wood.  The more you use it,
especially maple, the worse you'll notice the problem.

For something more durable, you need to use a hard polyurethane or lacquer.
Table Top Rockhard finish is pretty good as are others.  Staining won't be
near as much of a problem with a finish on it.  You can always use the
finish-of-choice's solvent and rub to get rid of the stain that might
develop over a long period of time and even reapply the finish later if need
be.  With a bare finish all you can do is sand and sand and more sanding to
get rid of the stain.  You'll end up with a little smaller mortar that way
too. <g>

If you're going to use a finish of some kind, I'd recommend an oil-based one
or at least applying a drying oil (Pure Tung, Walnut, etc.) first and then
applying the finish over it once dry/cured.  The oil might yellow the light
maple colored wood a little though.  Get a good amount of final finish on
there as you want it to protect it but not so much that it looks thick and
plasticy.  At least that's my personal preference.

- Andrew


Quote:
> The mortar is made out of maple.  At this time, we occasionally use a
marble
> mortar.  The wooden one is an experiment.  It usage will be light.  If it
is
> not working good it will end up as a decorative piece.

 
 
 

Mortar coating ?

Post by Arc » Sat, 13 Mar 2004 07:02:46


Hi Denis,  I have several Mortars/pestles that were much used on early
New England farms. They are very plain and sturdy, turned from end grain
maple and left unfinished.   Regards,  Arch  

                   Fortiter,

 
 
 

Mortar coating ?

Post by Georg » Sat, 13 Mar 2004 06:42:22


Nothing is the best answer.  If you put a surface finish on it, you'll be
eating it bit by bit.  If you put a non-drying oil on it, your allspice will
taste like the sage you crushed into it.  If it's still capable, burnish the
endgrain (it is endgrain at the bottom/) until it's quite warm and shiny to
close the pores as well as possible.

I leave mine bare, the oils from the spices dissipate with a little help
from detergent.


Quote:
> I just completed a wooden mortar.
> I wonder what coating to apply.

> --
> Denis
> Sprucewood, Rothesay, N.B

 
 
 

Mortar coating ?

Post by alan.. » Sat, 13 Mar 2004 22:41:37


On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 19:36:16 GMT, "Denis Marier"

Quote:

>I just completed a wooden mortar.
>I wonder what coating to apply.

   And there was I imagining he was planning to coat it with cement
mortar.

  Oil that does not go rancid, same for the pestle.
Alan,   in beautiful Golden Bay, Western Oz.
VK6 YAB    VKS 737 - W 617

 
 
 

Mortar coating ?

Post by Denis Marie » Tue, 16 Mar 2004 08:24:20


Thanks for all replies.  Every feedbacks makes it easier to go through the
leaning curve.


Quote:
> If you're going to just be mushing up herbs and other soft things, then
> simply leaving the maple bare should be fine.  It'll stain of course.
> That's why most, at least here in the midwest, of the old mortar/pestles
> were made of walnut.... you couldn't see the stain and it was hard (not to
> mention plentiful).  They also didn't care much if it did get stained. It
> was a utilitarian item.

> If you're going to be pulverizing seeds, peppercorns, pills and other hard
> stuff, the maple is too soft and it'll pit or simply have some of these
> small particles stick to it as the dig into the wood.  The more you use
it,
> especially maple, the worse you'll notice the problem.

> For something more durable, you need to use a hard polyurethane or
lacquer.
> Table Top Rockhard finish is pretty good as are others.  Staining won't be
> near as much of a problem with a finish on it.  You can always use the
> finish-of-choice's solvent and rub to get rid of the stain that might
> develop over a long period of time and even reapply the finish later if
need
> be.  With a bare finish all you can do is sand and sand and more sanding
to
> get rid of the stain.  You'll end up with a little smaller mortar that way
> too. <g>

> If you're going to use a finish of some kind, I'd recommend an oil-based
one
> or at least applying a drying oil (Pure Tung, Walnut, etc.) first and then
> applying the finish over it once dry/cured.  The oil might yellow the
light
> maple colored wood a little though.  Get a good amount of final finish on
> there as you want it to protect it but not so much that it looks thick and
> plasticy.  At least that's my personal preference.

> - Andrew



> > The mortar is made out of maple.  At this time, we occasionally use a
> marble
> > mortar.  The wooden one is an experiment.  It usage will be light.  If
it
> is
> > not working good it will end up as a decorative piece.