Kelton Hollowers

Kelton Hollowers

Post by Barry N. Turne » Sun, 22 Feb 2004 13:31:18



I just bought a set of Kelton Hollowers this week.  I bought the medium
size.  Does anyone have any experience or advice in how to best use them?
Any advice would be appreciated.  Thanks.

Barry

 
 
 

Kelton Hollowers

Post by Silva » Sun, 22 Feb 2004 16:27:53


Quote:

> I just bought a set of Kelton Hollowers this week.  I bought the medium
> size.  Does anyone have any experience or advice in how to best use them?
> Any advice would be appreciated.  Thanks.

Those things are junk.  I advise that you send them to me so I can dispose
of them properly.

--

Linux fanatic, and certified Geek;  registered Linux user #243621
http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Rue/5407/

 
 
 

Kelton Hollowers

Post by Barry N. Turne » Sun, 22 Feb 2004 23:22:59


Let's hope not.  If so, they are the most I've ever paid for junk (in the
way of turning tools, that is).  Seriously, have you ever used them?  They
just looked so simple and sturdy I couldn't resist.

Barry


Quote:

> > I just bought a set of Kelton Hollowers this week.  I bought the medium
> > size.  Does anyone have any experience or advice in how to best use
them?
> > Any advice would be appreciated.  Thanks.

> Those things are junk.  I advise that you send them to me so I can dispose
> of them properly.

> --

> Linux fanatic, and certified Geek;  registered Linux user #243621
> http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Rue/5407/

 
 
 

Kelton Hollowers

Post by bill » Mon, 23 Feb 2004 01:30:49


I think you missed his joke; I'll take them off your hands too!
Billh



Quote:
> Let's hope not.  If so, they are the most I've ever paid for junk (in the
> way of turning tools, that is).  Seriously, have you ever used them?  They
> just looked so simple and sturdy I couldn't resist.

> Barry




> > > I just bought a set of Kelton Hollowers this week.  I bought the
medium
> > > size.  Does anyone have any experience or advice in how to best use
> them?
> > > Any advice would be appreciated.  Thanks.

> > Those things are junk.  I advise that you send them to me so I can
dispose
> > of them properly.

> > --

> > Linux fanatic, and certified Geek;  registered Linux user #243621
> > http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Rue/5407/

 
 
 

Kelton Hollowers

Post by Lyn J. Mangiamel » Mon, 23 Feb 2004 03:06:14


Hi Barry,
Congratulations on your purchase. The Kelton Hollowers are some of my
favorite and most used hollowing tools. The shapes are sized just about
perfectly to go from opening up the form to final cutting under a rim. I
assume you obtained the 1/2 inch size, which is IMO the most valuable of
the sets for most people.

They are capable of taking a rather large bite when used as a
traditional scraping tool, because of the relatively large contact
surface they offer, thus I most often use them at least slightly angled
in more of a shear scraping position. The horizontal position can be
effective for aggressively removing a large amount of wood when
initially clearing the form, but I think those who have had difficulty
with the Keltons have failed to roll the tool over to the shearing
position progressively more as the wall is thinned. Generally, like with
most scraping tools, you want to use these at a 9 o'clock or slightly
higher level within the form,though you this is less critical as the
tool is rolled over for shear scraping.

Keep in mind that you often can deal with the bottom center "cone" that
usually forms more easily by using the "back" of the tool tip moved to
the right. This is usually safer than trying to approach the "cone" head
  with the usual cutting side of the tip. Again, I'd keep the tool
slightly angled, though a shearing cut is not as critical here.

You can also control their aggressiveness by how great a burr you put on
the tool. Generaly I find only a slight burr is the most desirable. I
find a burr most easily obtained on these tools by using a slipstone
used vertically and stroked upward when the tool is held horizontally.
There is a slight bevel on these tools, so just align the slipstone to
contact both high points  the bevel as you stroke. If you can feel the
edge being raised with your fingernail, this is enough. I will
occasionally smooth off the top of the tool so that a fresh burr will be
formed, but do this cautiously so that you are mostly only removing the
  raised surfaces of the burr, as the top of the Kelton hollowers has a
specially hardened layer, so you don't want to eventually remove that (I
don't believe I ever have, and I've used these tools a lot and for a
long time). I'd never take these tools to a grinder, and do all my
edge/burr maintainance by hand. I prefer the Henry Taylor two slipstone
set that is available from Craft Supplies (the large is great for use on
the Keltons and general flute maintainance, the small works perfectly
for Glaser bowl gouge flutes) over diamond or waterstone slipstones,
though all will work. I do tend to use a fine diamond credit card to
smooth the tops.

These tools are relatively tolerant with respect to lathe speed. I think
Kelton generally recommends something in the 800-1000 range, though I
often use even lower speeds, as is my usualy preference with all
hollowing tools. Higher speeds will work for smaller work, but are more
likely to induce vibration.

Like with all hollowing tools, it is important to clear the
chips/shavings often to prevent them from building up and interfering
with tip contact with the wood. Again, a shear scraping cut is less
sensitive to chip build up when the tip is used perpendicular to the
wood surface. With the lathe turned by hand or powered down to nearly
zero rpm, the tools can actually be helpful in guiding the shavings out
of the form.

There's probably more to say, but that's what comes to mind for now.

Lyn

Quote:

> I just bought a set of Kelton Hollowers this week.  I bought the medium
> size.  Does anyone have any experience or advice in how to best use them?
> Any advice would be appreciated.  Thanks.

> Barry

 
 
 

Kelton Hollowers

Post by Fred Holde » Mon, 23 Feb 2004 09:30:02


Hello Barry,

Basically, the Kelton Hollowers are scrapers as are most hollowing tools, but
unlike normal scrapers you need to cut at about centerline of the rotating
piece. They do not work very well unless you first drill a hole in the center of
the workpiece. You then cut from the center toward the side. Make sure you have
a set of calipers to check wall thickness. It is very easy to turn through the
side of the vessel. I should also mention that these are designed to be end
grain hollowing tools. I've never used them for hollowing a basic bowl shape so
do not know how they would work.

I recommend you near final turn the outside so that you have a shape to work to
while hollowing. Next drill a hole to the depth that you plan to hollow. This
hole needs to be large enough to allow the tip of your tool to enter it. Start
with the straightest tool. Work from center toward the outside. Cut a swipe
across from center to edge. Repeat this until your are as deep as you wish to
hollow. You should have larger hole down in the middle part, that is larger than
the mouth of the vessel.

When you can no longer cut along the side, but still have more wood to remove,
change to the next more crooked tool and enlarge your hole. If the shape is not
too radical, you may be able to do all of your hollowing with just the two
tools. In fact, I recommend that you make a simple enough vessel to begin with
that only the two straightest tools are needed.

I'll go a step further, simply turn a cup for your first project. That way you
can see what the tool is doing and it will help you to get a feel for where the
tip of the tool might be within the vessel.

Good luck. They are a good set of tools and will do a fine hollowing job for
you. You'll just need some practice.

Fred Holder
<http://www.fholder.com/>


Quote:

>I just bought a set of Kelton Hollowers this week.  I bought the medium
>size.  Does anyone have any experience or advice in how to best use them?
>Any advice would be appreciated.  Thanks.

>Barry

 
 
 

Kelton Hollowers

Post by Silva » Mon, 23 Feb 2004 14:26:55


Quote:

> Let's hope not.  If so, they are the most I've ever paid for junk (in the
> way of turning tools, that is).  Seriously, have you ever used them?  They
> just looked so simple and sturdy I couldn't resist.

I will have used them after you get rid of that junk and send it to me.

(See the smiley here?  --->  :) )

No, I haven't used them.  They're on my someday list though, along with a
buncha other Kelton stuff.

--

Linux fanatic, and certified Geek;  registered Linux user #243621
http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Rue/5407/

 
 
 

Kelton Hollowers

Post by Barry N. Turne » Mon, 23 Feb 2004 23:58:11


I didn't miss it..............I just didn't bite.........................:-)
Barry


Quote:
> I think you missed his joke; I'll take them off your hands too!
> Billh



> > Let's hope not.  If so, they are the most I've ever paid for junk (in
the
> > way of turning tools, that is).  Seriously, have you ever used them?
They
> > just looked so simple and sturdy I couldn't resist.

> > Barry




> > > > I just bought a set of Kelton Hollowers this week.  I bought the
> medium
> > > > size.  Does anyone have any experience or advice in how to best use
> > them?
> > > > Any advice would be appreciated.  Thanks.

> > > Those things are junk.  I advise that you send them to me so I can
> dispose
> > > of them properly.

> > > --

> > > Linux fanatic, and certified Geek;  registered Linux user #243621
> > > http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Rue/5407/

 
 
 

Kelton Hollowers

Post by Barry N. Turne » Tue, 24 Feb 2004 00:11:47


Thanks, Lyn.  I appreciate the advice, especially about rolling the tool
over so that it is shear scraping and on sharpening.  I can't envision my
needing to grind these tools for a long, long time, if ever.  I don't know
that I would trust myself doing it, even then.

Actually, I bought the 5/8" set.  Woodcraft didn't have the 1/2" set in
stock the day I went in.  I had sort of pre-determined that the 1/2" was the
set I would buy.  Had they had the 1/2" set in stock, I probably would have
bought it.

Although I am still turning on a Jet Mini, I find that the tools I buy and
use tend to be a bit "oversized" for what I would expect to be appropriate
for that size lathe.  I think these tools are going to become favorites very
quickly.

I went to Kelton's website and read about the tools and that helped.
Although I believe they called the tools "shear scrapers", I don't think
they ever quite got around to telling how to use them as such.  Thanks for
your very helpful response.

Barry



Quote:
> Hi Barry,
> Congratulations on your purchase. The Kelton Hollowers are some of my
> favorite and most used hollowing tools. The shapes are sized just about
> perfectly to go from opening up the form to final cutting under a rim. I
> assume you obtained the 1/2 inch size, which is IMO the most valuable of
> the sets for most people.

> They are capable of taking a rather large bite when used as a
> traditional scraping tool, because of the relatively large contact
> surface they offer, thus I most often use them at least slightly angled
> in more of a shear scraping position. The horizontal position can be
> effective for aggressively removing a large amount of wood when
> initially clearing the form, but I think those who have had difficulty
> with the Keltons have failed to roll the tool over to the shearing
> position progressively more as the wall is thinned. Generally, like with
> most scraping tools, you want to use these at a 9 o'clock or slightly
> higher level within the form,though you this is less critical as the
> tool is rolled over for shear scraping.

> Keep in mind that you often can deal with the bottom center "cone" that
> usually forms more easily by using the "back" of the tool tip moved to
> the right. This is usually safer than trying to approach the "cone" head
>   with the usual cutting side of the tip. Again, I'd keep the tool
> slightly angled, though a shearing cut is not as critical here.

> You can also control their aggressiveness by how great a burr you put on
> the tool. Generaly I find only a slight burr is the most desirable. I
> find a burr most easily obtained on these tools by using a slipstone
> used vertically and stroked upward when the tool is held horizontally.
> There is a slight bevel on these tools, so just align the slipstone to
> contact both high points  the bevel as you stroke. If you can feel the
> edge being raised with your fingernail, this is enough. I will
> occasionally smooth off the top of the tool so that a fresh burr will be
> formed, but do this cautiously so that you are mostly only removing the
>   raised surfaces of the burr, as the top of the Kelton hollowers has a
> specially hardened layer, so you don't want to eventually remove that (I
> don't believe I ever have, and I've used these tools a lot and for a
> long time). I'd never take these tools to a grinder, and do all my
> edge/burr maintainance by hand. I prefer the Henry Taylor two slipstone
> set that is available from Craft Supplies (the large is great for use on
> the Keltons and general flute maintainance, the small works perfectly
> for Glaser bowl gouge flutes) over diamond or waterstone slipstones,
> though all will work. I do tend to use a fine diamond credit card to
> smooth the tops.

> These tools are relatively tolerant with respect to lathe speed. I think
> Kelton generally recommends something in the 800-1000 range, though I
> often use even lower speeds, as is my usualy preference with all
> hollowing tools. Higher speeds will work for smaller work, but are more
> likely to induce vibration.

> Like with all hollowing tools, it is important to clear the
> chips/shavings often to prevent them from building up and interfering
> with tip contact with the wood. Again, a shear scraping cut is less
> sensitive to chip build up when the tip is used perpendicular to the
> wood surface. With the lathe turned by hand or powered down to nearly
> zero rpm, the tools can actually be helpful in guiding the shavings out
> of the form.

> There's probably more to say, but that's what comes to mind for now.

> Lyn


> > I just bought a set of Kelton Hollowers this week.  I bought the medium
> > size.  Does anyone have any experience or advice in how to best use
them?
> > Any advice would be appreciated.  Thanks.

> > Barry

 
 
 

Kelton Hollowers

Post by Barry N. Turne » Tue, 24 Feb 2004 00:12:44


Thanks for all the very helpful advice.  The tools work great!

Barry


Quote:
> Hello Barry,

> Basically, the Kelton Hollowers are scrapers as are most hollowing tools,
but
> unlike normal scrapers you need to cut at about centerline of the rotating
> piece. They do not work very well unless you first drill a hole in the
center of
> the workpiece. You then cut from the center toward the side. Make sure you
have
> a set of calipers to check wall thickness. It is very easy to turn through
the
> side of the vessel. I should also mention that these are designed to be
end
> grain hollowing tools. I've never used them for hollowing a basic bowl
shape so
> do not know how they would work.

> I recommend you near final turn the outside so that you have a shape to
work to
> while hollowing. Next drill a hole to the depth that you plan to hollow.
This
> hole needs to be large enough to allow the tip of your tool to enter it.
Start
> with the straightest tool. Work from center toward the outside. Cut a
swipe
> across from center to edge. Repeat this until your are as deep as you wish
to
> hollow. You should have larger hole down in the middle part, that is
larger than
> the mouth of the vessel.

> When you can no longer cut along the side, but still have more wood to
remove,
> change to the next more crooked tool and enlarge your hole. If the shape
is not
> too radical, you may be able to do all of your hollowing with just the two
> tools. In fact, I recommend that you make a simple enough vessel to begin
with
> that only the two straightest tools are needed.

> I'll go a step further, simply turn a cup for your first project. That way
you
> can see what the tool is doing and it will help you to get a feel for
where the
> tip of the tool might be within the vessel.

> Good luck. They are a good set of tools and will do a fine hollowing job
for
> you. You'll just need some practice.

> Fred Holder
> <http://www.fholder.com/>


says...

> >I just bought a set of Kelton Hollowers this week.  I bought the medium
> >size.  Does anyone have any experience or advice in how to best use them?
> >Any advice would be appreciated.  Thanks.

> >Barry

 
 
 

Kelton Hollowers

Post by Ray Spark » Tue, 24 Feb 2004 16:28:26


Hello all,
I think I made a blew in the way I sent my reply. Sorry about that if I did,
If I didn't then don't worry about this one.

--
Ray